Categories :

Similar artists

Albums

HI-RES$32.49
CD$25.49

Rock - Released June 10, 2016 | Legacy Recordings

Hi-Res Distinctions 4F de Télérama - Best New Reissue
CD$15.49

Rock - Released October 30, 2015 | Rhino - Warner Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography - Pitchfork: Best New Reissue
HI-RES$32.49
CD$25.49

Rock - Released June 10, 2016 | Legacy Recordings

Hi-Res Distinctions 4F de Télérama - Pitchfork: Best New Reissue
HI-RES$14.99
CD$12.99

Rock - Released February 28, 1970 | Warner Records

Hi-Res Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
CD$18.99

Rock - Released October 18, 2013 | Warner Records

Distinctions 4F de Télérama
CD$12.99

Rock - Released June 30, 1975 | Rhino - Warner Records

Distinctions Stereophile: Record To Die For
HI-RES$17.99
CD$14.99

Rock - Released October 25, 2019 | Exile

Hi-Res
Does the cliché of the artist improving with time, just like good wine, apply to Van Morrison? For several years now, the old bard from Belfast has been unstoppable, publishing up to two albums a year. With Three Chords and the Truth (his sixth in four years!), he proves it is possible to have both quantity and quality. Composed of 14 previously unpublished songs (not covers, as was often the case on his previous records from the 2010’s), this 2019 vintage encapsulates all of Van The Man’s art. His unique style of jazz and blues tinged with gospel soul is supported by a refined, warm instrumentation. With his slick double bass, groovy vintage organ, raspy brass and inimitable voice, Van Morrison carries on carving his own path and the result often touches the sublime. His old guitarist Jay Berliner (found on Astral Weeks, his 1968 masterpiece) even brings a delicate touch to the record. And Bill Medley from The Righteous Brothers sings with him on Fame Will Eat the Soul. Ultimately, Van Morrison is never a parody of himself, and the pleasure that making music brings him at 74 years old is more than obvious. © Max Dembo/Qobuz
HI-RES$14.99
CD$12.99

Vocal Jazz - Released December 7, 2018 | Exile Productions Ltd.

Hi-Res
The prophet has returned! Van Morrison, he who brought us the timeless Gloria and Brown Eyed Girl, steps back in time for his new album The Prophet Speaks. The Irish bard delves into the world of jazz, blues and rhythm’n’blues with his renditions of classics from John Lee Hooker, Sam Cooke, Willie Dixon and Soloman Burke, to name but a few. Such are the talents of Van The Man that he even includes six of his own compositions (Got to Go Where The Love Is, 5am Greenwich Mean Time, Love Is Hard Work, Spirit Will Provide, Ain’t Gonna Moan No More and The Prophet Speaks) within the genre of jazz’n’blues’n’soul. “It was important for me to get back to recording new music as well as doing some of the blues material that has inspired me from the beginning” he says. Once again, the album features its fair share of musical virtuosos, including killer organist Joey DeFrancesco (who co-wrote You’re Driving Me Crazy with Morrison), guitarist Dan Wilson, drummer Michael Ode and saxophonist Troy Roberts. A classy and classical album that doesn’t look to reinvent the genre but rather to revive its original soul. © Max Dembo/Qobuz
CD$32.49

Rock - Released March 22, 2019 | Legacy Recordings

22 years after it was first released, The Healing Game is back in all its glory. This Deluxe 3CD Edition was released in March 2019 and features the original album as well as some thirty new releases from 1995/1997, ranging from alternate takes and duets to live performances. The first disc includes ten original songs and five bonus tracks. The second is devoted to sessions and collaborations, including early versions of The Healing Game and Fire in the Belly, five tracks with Carl Perkins and two with John Lee Hooker. Finally, the third CD is a concert recorded at the Montreux Festival in Switzerland on July 17, 1997. When The Healing Game was released in March 1997, Van Morrison was 52 years old and had about twenty solo albums to his name. Some of them, such as Astral Weeks (1968), Moondance (1970) and Veedon Fleece (1974) are considered to be among the best masterpieces in the history of rock music. Although this album doesn’t quite compare to these marvels, it is still a reminder that the Irish bard is a unique singer and songwriter. The two decades between the release of the original opus and this re-release will give people a chance to reappraise his soul-stirring music – that unmistakable mix of folk and jazz that never gets old and those lyrics spoken directly from the heart. © Max Dembo/Qobuz
HI-RES$14.99
CD$12.99

Rock - Released November 1, 1968 | Rhino - Warner Records

Hi-Res
HI-RES$17.49
CD$14.99

Vocal Jazz - Released April 27, 2018 | Legacy Recordings

Hi-Res
HI-RES$24.49
CD$19.49

Rock - Released December 4, 2015 | Legacy Recordings

Hi-Res
CD$13.99

Rock - Released November 29, 2019 | Exile

HI-RES$17.49
CD$12.99

Rock - Released June 5, 1995 | Legacy Recordings

Hi-Res
Van Morrison's 22nd album of new studio material will have a familiar sound to anyone who has followed his career thus far. The songs are set to steady mid-tempo grooves, with tasty guitar and organ solos and warm horn charts, over which Morrison sings in his butterscotch baritone, employing his characteristic slurs and repetitions, exploring topics that have interested him over the years. If there is any difference from earlier works, it is one of degree: Days Like This is typically introspective and given over to spiritual, psychological, and romantic concerns, but its songs are unusually straightforward. Beginning with a direct, up-tempo love song, "Perfect Fit," Morrison provides a statement of purpose in "Raincheck" ("Won't let the bastards get me down...I don't fade away, unless I want to"), yet confesses to doubt ("Underlying Depression," "Melancholia"). He matter-of-factly describes his profession ("Songwriter"), and discounts spirituality, at least in formal terms ("No Religion"), though in the extended song "Ancient Highway" he prays to "my higher self." In the title song, he turns the usual cliché on its head -- the "Days Like This" he means are the good ones, "when everything falls into place like the flick of a switch." Morrison changes the pace with two covers of 1950s oldies, the '56 Eddy Arnold hit "You Don't Know Me," and the '50 Kay Starr and Tennessee Ernie Ford hit "I'll Never Be Free," on both of which he duets with his daughter Shana. As he approaches 50, Van Morrison remains interested in the same subjects and is able to sing about them with the same forcefulness. "I cleaned up my diction, I had nothing left to say," he confesses at one point. Nothing new, perhaps, but on Days Like This Morrison says some of the same things with a new clarity. © William Ruhlmann /TiVo
HI-RES$14.99
CD$12.99

Rock - Released September 30, 2016 | Exile

Hi-Res
Van Morrison does exactly what he wants, when he wants, and continually mines the past no matter the cost. It's been four years since the Celtic soulman issued a collection of original studio material (Born to Sing: No Plan B), but given the music, it could have been yesterday. Morrison has no interest in innovation, he's already done that. The pace here is (mostly) laid-back, the music drenched in jazz, R&B, blues, and classy pop. He revels throughout in an elegant slow burn; his lyric themes are bittersweet, melancholic, filled with emotional and symbolic memory; his longing for the previous prevalent. The first line on album-opener "Let It Rhyme" is: "Throw another coin in the wishing well/Tell everybody to go to hell…" atop skeins of country and R&B as he reveals his recalcitrance. Celtic folk burrows underneath soul in the title track, as a trio of female backing singers, swelling B-3, and a snare undulate beneath his lyrics: "Keep me singing, a new beginning/waiting for my change to come...." A breezy harmonica solo adds a twist, but this tune reflects (musically as well as poetically) the protagonist in "Tore Down à la Rimbaud" from 1985's A Sense of Wonder, who is far down the road, holding stubbornly to a hope he knows (like his countryman Samuel Beckett) will elude him. "Out in the Cold Again" is one of Morrison's finest torch songs in a decade. His delivery hovers just above a small string section and Fiachra Trench's Errol Garner-esque piano. "The Pen Is Mightier Than the Sword" weaves blues-drenched electric guitar and organ exchanges in a midtempo steamy groove appended to excellent backing vocals from Dana Masters and Lance Ellington. The lone cover is a gospelized-blues version of Don Robey's and Alfred Braggs' ballad "Share Your Love with Me." (It was originally recorded by Bobby "Blue" Bland in 1963, and made immortal by Aretha Franklin in 1970. Morrison's version lies closer to the original in spirit.) The singer revisits his time in the San Francisco Bay area for "In Tiburon," where a circular Celtic jazz melody flows under his poetic lines as they name check various signposts in memory, invoking Beat poets, musicians, and locales offeringa tale of a woman gazing out a window listening to music. He invokes this mysterious person over and again with the lines "Now we need each other to lean on…." A muted trumpet solo is misty, bittersweet, and tender. "Look Beyond the Hill" is a fingerpopping jazz tune with ghost traces of a "Moondance" musical feel, but without the magic hook. The outlier is "Going Down to Bangor," a raw blues, that directly references the early Chicago sound. Morrison offers his best blues shout and wails on harmonica. Keep Me Singing closes with "Caledonia Swing," an instrumental where skiffle, punchy R&B, and bluebeat ska rhythm (yes, really) come together in trademark style. Morrison delivers each of these songs with attentiveness; the material is consistently presented with finesse. Nothing further is required. © Thom Jurek /TiVo
HI-RES$17.49
CD$12.99

Rock - Released August 28, 2015 | Legacy Recordings

Hi-Res
The final album of Van Morrison's remarkably prolific and innovative 1968-1974 period (followed by three years of silence), Veedon Fleece brings the singer full circle, returning him to the introspection and poignancy of Astral Weeks. Composed following his sudden divorce from wife Janet Planet and subsequent retreat from the U.S., the songs are subtle and Spartan, the performances deeply felt; though less tortured and cathartic than Astral Weeks, it's a record fraught with emotional upheaval, as evidenced by such superior moments as "Linden Arden Stole the Highlights," "Who Was That Masked Man," and "You Don't Pull No Punches, But You Don't Push the River." That said, this is one of those -- and there are several -- forgotten classics in the Morrison catalog. Because it followed hot on the heels of his universally acclaimed double live album It's Too Late to Stop Now..., released only a month previous, this effort, like its likewise unheralded -- but equally wonderful -- studio effort Hard Nose the Highway, which was issued only six months before, the album suffered from a lack of exposure because of saturation in the marketplace rather than any lack in quality. Veedon Fleece is every bit the creative equal of its more famous predecessors. With its elegiac tone and deeply autobiographical lyrics, this was a Morrison who didn't so readily associate himself with the feel-good, peace, love, and rhythm & blues sound American audiences were used to. If any album reflects a real period of transition for an artist, it's this one. It's brilliant. © Jason Ankeny & Thom Jurek /TiVo
HI-RES$14.99
CD$12.99

Rock - Released November 1, 1968 | Rhino - Warner Records

Hi-Res
HI-RES$14.99
CD$12.99

Rock - Released June 30, 1975 | Rhino - Warner Records

Hi-Res
HI-RES$17.49
CD$14.99

Rock - Released March 13, 2015 | Exile Productions - RCA Records

Hi-Res
It's not hard to wonder if Van Morrison was trying to drive away listeners by titling this album Duets: Re-Working the Catalogue, a name that practically howls this is a work defined by a lack of ambition and a desire to rest on his laurels. The clumsy title is especially strange because this an honestly good album that doesn't fit those negative expectations. Even though Re-Working the Catalogue finds Morrison reviving songs from his extensive repertoire, he wisely focuses on lesser-known tunes rather than compete with his best-known work, and Morrison is able to generate a genuine enthusiasm for this music, which might not be the case if he tried to record "Moondance" or "Brown Eyed Girl" one more time. And the Belfast Soul Man for the most part has chosen duet partners with intelligence; rather than load up this set with current chart-toppers who have little knowledge of Morrison's legacy, most of the singers working with Morrison are cut from similar cloth, such as Steve Winwood, Chris Farlowe, Georgie Fame, and Bobby Womack (in what proved to be one of the latter's final recordings). If Joss Stone is considerably younger and more melismatic than Van's other partners, she understands what "Wild Honey" needs, and Michael Bublé delivers an admirably lively performance on "Real Real Gone." There are almost certainly other singers who would have sounded better on "Whatever Happened to P.J. Proby?," but Mr. Proby himself seems to be in on the joke with his delivery, and Van honestly sounds like he's having a lot of fun (not a common occurrence) with Taj Mahal on "How Can a Poor Boy?" And if Mavis Staples' voice is a bit rough on "If I Ever Needed Someone," she delivers the song with a churchy authority that Morrison clearly respects. As for Van himself, at the age of 69 his vocals lack the power and emotional force he so easily conjured in the '70s, but his sense of phrasing is as soulful and idiosyncratic as it has ever been, and he seems determined to find something in these songs that he missed the first time. This could easily have been a very lazy album, but Morrison gives this material an honest and thoughtful effort. (His grainy but potent sax work is a lot of fun, too.) And the production (by Don Was) and mix (by Bob Rock) is smooth without polishing out the personality of Morrison and his guests. Recutting a batch of your old songs is usually a sign you've run out of ideas, as is recording a full album of duets; while it's hard to know what Morrison's motivations were for making Duets: Re-Working the Catalogue, the pleasant surprise is that Morrison has managed to dodge both those bullets, and if it's a long way from a triumph, it's a solid, heartfelt work from a veteran artist who isn't about to give up the ghost. © Mark Deming /TiVo
HI-RES$17.49
CD$12.99

Rock - Released September 1, 1987 | Legacy Recordings

Hi-Res
If the title didn't tip you off, the opening five-minute jazz instrumental "Spanish Steps" certainly reveals that Poetic Champions Compose is an art record. Of course, Van Morrison has been making art records since at least Inarticulate Speech of the Heart, perhaps Common One, so that shouldn't come as a surprise. What is a bit of a shock is that Morrison begins to shake off his self-conscious straitjacket here, letting a little more grit into the music, even if the record still is firmly ensconced in mid-tempos and ballads, with only Van's voice (soulful, yet not histrionic) to pull you in. Much of this tends to float by, with only the occasional song ("I Forgot That Love Existed," "Did Ye Get Healed?") distinguishing itself. The overly mellow atmosphere and Van's arch artiness may not make it universally appealing, yet this record is warmer, stronger than many of its predecessors, one of his highlights from the '80s. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo

Artist

Van Morrison in the magazine