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Electronic/Dance - Released January 1, 2014 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Electronic/Dance - Released March 18, 2016 | Smith Hyde Productions

Distinctions 4F de Télérama
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Electronic/Dance - Released November 13, 2015 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

Distinctions Pitchfork: Best New Reissue
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Electronic/Dance - Released January 1, 2014 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

Distinctions Pitchfork: Best New Reissue

Electronic/Dance - Released October 16, 2007 | ATO Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Like their heroes Kraftwerk, Underworld's Karl Hyde and Rick Smith appear to work in a completely sterile environment, unbothered by charts or sales projections or label concerns about their marketing abilities. They simply reemerge periodically with another full-length of precise but swinging techno, with vocals that somehow create a rather plaintive sense of detachment (Radiohead's similarity in this area should not be overlooked). More than 2002's A Hundred Days Off or 1998's Beaucoup Fish, Oblivion with Bells harks back to Underworld's 1993 rebirth with the epic Dubnobasswithmyheadman. (Even the cover design and accordion-style liner notes are similar.) The acid techno is firmly in place, with little or no regard for developments in the form after the '80s. Still, unlike other electronica mainstays who have occasionally revealed a little weariness -- either from trying to change or trying to stay the same -- Underworld never sound particularly tired on Oblivion with Bells. Granted, the music is less innovative than before, and also more quiet, which makes Hyde's vocals more critical than they've ever been. Unfortunately, however, they don't benefit from the scrutiny. "Ring Road" and "Holding the Moth" are particularly odd, utilizing Underworld's usual cut-and-paste phraseology, but with productions and performances that never come together like their classics "Dark & Long" or "Pearls Girl." ~ John Bush
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Electronic/Dance - Released January 1, 2014 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

Distinctions Pitchfork: Best New Reissue
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Electronic/Dance - Released July 27, 2018 | Caroline International

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It is said that this collaboration between one of the first punk artists in history, Iggy Pop, and the electronic trio 90's Underworld, is the most exciting of the year. Surprising, for sure, given what he said at the release of an electronic music set at Caprices Festival in 2007 (“I fucking hate this fucking techno shit. It’s fake.”). But it seems that the Stooges’ leader must have changed his mind, and so much the better because the result of this improbable fusion lives up to their reputation. Recorded in a hotel room transformed into a real studio by one of Underworld's members, Rick Smith, this four-track EP is the result of spontaneity and a combination of circumstances caused by the production of the soundtrack for the film T2 Trainspotting. In fact, it is a question here of setting out new cutlery but this time eating at the same table; the two names had already appeared in the credits of the first of Danny Boyle's films ("Lust for Life" for Iggy Pop and "Born Slippy (Nuxx)" for Underworld, of which the latter contributed mostly to the fame of the trio). “I turned up thinking, ‘I’ve got one chance here to convince this gentleman that we should work together” said Rick Smith about the record. “So I turned up with basically half my studio, hired a hotel room, set up and sat waiting.” Iggy Pop continues “When you are confronted with somebody who has a whole bloody studio there in the hotel room, a Skyped director who has won the Oscar recently and a fucking microphone in front of you and 30 finished pieces of very polished music, you don’t want to be the wimp that goes, ‘Uh-uhhh’, so my mind was racing”. © Sylvain Di Cristo/Qobuz 
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Electronic/Dance - Released December 6, 2018 | Smith Hyde Productions

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Electronic/Dance - Released January 1, 1995 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

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Electronic/Dance - Released May 2, 2019 | Smith Hyde Productions

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Electronic/Dance - Released July 4, 2019 | Smith Hyde Productions

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Electronic/Dance - Released March 1, 1999 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

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Electronic/Dance - Released January 1, 2014 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

The three-disc 1992-2012 anthology replaces the two-disc 1992-2002 as a generous overview of Underworld's lengthy second act. It was issued simultaneously with A Collection, a single-disc release featuring space-saving edits of the group's lengthier highlights. Bizarrely, this lacks some of the cuts included on A Collection -- namely "Beebop Hurry," "Downpipe," "The First Note Is Silent," and "King of Snake" -- and reserves the third disc for rarities, including B-sides, Japan-only bonus tracks, and compilation contributions. The cardboard foldout package is sturdy and holds a glossy, photo-packed booklet. Track information is minimal -- there's no release information whatsoever -- yet most of the photos have dates and locations. Like a lot of career overviews, this is somewhere between an introduction and a collector's item, but it initially retailed for the price of a single disc and holds an edge over the marginally less expensive A Collection. ~ Andy Kellman
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Electronic/Dance - Released March 7, 2019 | Smith Hyde Productions

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Electronic/Dance - Released January 1, 2014 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

Underworld's eighth album found the duo seeking outside production, which came in the form of a half-dozen dance heavyweights who pull the aging duo in several different directions, mostly pop, trance, and, occasionally, their native techno. The opening "Bird 1" is a glorious return to form, featuring a production from Dubfire that recasts the duo in the gritty, rain-soaked techno of 1993, a dead ringer for Dubnobasswithmyheadman's "Dark & Long." Underworld have rarely revisited old ground, making this a startling and excellent track. Still, Barking doesn't spend much time there, instead visiting much brighter territory on the single "Scribble," with a production by High Contrast that should have creative directors rearranging their budgets to license. The biggest name here is Paul Van Dyk, whose "Diamond Jigsaw" is as straight-ahead as techno can get -- and also sounds like it could earn its share of advertising dollars. Although this is hardly Underworld at their finest, the duo's songwriting fits the mainstream productions and results in a solid dance album for the 2010s -- music for aging-raver activities like driving cars, pushing swings, or jogging on treadmills. ~ John Bush
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Electronic/Dance - Released January 1, 2014 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

As if they didn't have to prove they're still viable as a commercial and artistic outfit, Underworld's Rick Smith and Karl Hyde faced an additional challenge for A Hundred Days Off -- prove to the dance cognoscenti they could withstand the loss of Darren Emerson, the producer who kick-started the band when he joined in 1992. Unfortunately, the results prove only that Emerson most likely did contribute a certain something, now lacking, to the three LPs he graced. Underworld's trademarked sound, however, is mostly a creation of Smith and Hyde, and present from the opener, "Mo Move," wherein a dizzying cycle of gurgling bass, crepe paper percussion, and sequencers set off Hyde's lonely, adrift vocals. The album also reaches an early peak on "Two Months Off," with a repeated synthesizer riff playing off a brilliant succession of harmonies and basslines, with a hypnotizing performance by Hyde over the top. From there, the album heads off into a succession of overly familiar tracks, either po-mo acid house blues à la Dubnobasswithmyheadman ("Sola Sistim," "Trim," "Ballet Lane") or minimalist, pinpoint techno ("Dinosaur Adventure 3D," "Luetin"). Surprisingly, counter to expectations after the brash youngster leaves the fold, A Hundred Days Off doesn't suffer from the oldster syndrome; the production is edgy and up-to-date as usual, but the songs lack the energy, the feeling, and even the melody of Underworld's classic records. ~ John Bush
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Electronic/Dance - Released January 1, 2014 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

Underworld didn't become one of the biggest groups in the dance world by sitting in the studio all day, spending as much time making tea as producing tracks. Between records, the trio toured incessantly -- playing rock venues, dancefloors, major festivals all over the world -- and consistently made the single best case for techno working in a live (as opposed to club) context. So instead of a mix album (though alumnus Darren Emerson did record a volume in the Global Underground series), in mid-2000 Underworld released the live album Everything, Everything. And just like their studio LPs, this one works so well, not just because the tracks are so excellently produced, but because Underworld is so good at placing sympathetic tracks next to each other and creating effortless-sounding transitions. Each of the act's previous albums blended tracks so smoothly that new listeners were often forced to check the CD player just to see which track they're on at any second. Beginning here with "Juanita/Kiteless," the opening track(s) from 1996's Second Toughest in the Infants, Underworld tweaks the production slightly, then slides right into "Cups" and "Push Upstairs" from 1999's Beaucoup Fish. After pausing a few seconds to catch their breath (figuratively speaking) and accept some audience applause, the trio push onward into "Pearls Girl," perhaps the best production of their career and an obvious peak here. Granted, Underworld doesn't blend each transition on Everything, Everything, and Karl Hyde's vocals aren't always as perfect as on the LP. Still, excellent track selection (evenly distributed from all three LPs) and a winning performance let the band get nearly everything right on their first live album. ~ John Bush
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Electronic/Dance - Released March 1, 1999 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

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Electronic/Dance - Released November 13, 2015 | UMC (Universal Music Catalogue)

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Electronic/Dance - Released February 28, 2019 | Smith Hyde Productions