Your basket is empty

Categories :

Similar artists

Albums

From
CD$0.99

Alternative & Indie - Released May 15, 2020 | Prolifica Inc.

From
CD$3.99

Electronic - Released May 18, 2012 | Kitsuné Musique

From
CD$9.99

Alternative & Indie - Released September 3, 2012 | V2 Cooperative Music

From
HI-RES$14.99
CD$9.99

Alternative & Indie - Released February 17, 2010 | Glassnote Entertainment Group LLC

Hi-Res
Though Two Door Cinema Club's music is resolutely indie at heart, the band released its early singles on the hip, largely electronic imprint Kitsuné. After listening to Tourist History, what the label heard in them becomes clear: Two Door Cinema Club craft immaculate pop that is infectious almost to a fault. On songs like their calling card “Something Good Can Work,” nimble guitars and drums -- both live and programmed -- propel yearning verses and big, hopeful choruses perfect for shouting along to. Alex Trimble’s boyish vocals recall Phoenix’s Thomas Mars and the Postal Service’s Ben Gibbard, and indeed, Two Door Cinema Club is just as adept as those bands are at fusing rock and electronic sounds into a smooth, sleek whole. Whether it’s the laser-like synths that ricochet through “Come Back Home”’s verses or streaking textures on “Do You Want It All?,” this hybrid never feels contrived or overcooked. And unlike some of their contemporaries, a unique urgency runs through Tourist History: even when trying to slow down, as on “Undercover Martyn,” the band gets carried away and the song picks up to Two Door Cinema Club’s usual brisk pace. For most of Tourist History, they stay on the right side of the fine line between consistency and monotony, and as the album unfolds, the band throws some curves into its almost scientifically perfect pop songs. “Cigarettes in the Theatre”’s trumpet solo harks back to the mid-‘80s heyday of sophisti-pop, while “I Can Talk”’s playfully sampled backing vocals show a wit that extends to lyrics like “Eat That Up, It’s Good for You”’s “You would look a little better/Don’t you know/If you just wore less makeup.” While Two Door Cinema Club don't yet have the flawless style or emotional weight of some of their influences, Tourist History just gets catchier and more stylized as it goes on, offering a promising foundation for the band to embellish with even more personality next time. © Heather Phares /TiVo
From
HI-RES$14.99
CD$9.99

Alternative & Indie - Released October 14, 2016 | Glassnote Entertainment Group LLC

Hi-Res
Ireland's Two Door Cinema Club transform into a glitzy disco and synth pop-infused powerhouse on their third studio album, 2016's Gameshow. Having garnered favorable attention for their infectious, dance-rock-heavy 2010 debut, Tourist History, the trio of singer/guitarist/programmer Alex Trimble, guitarist/singer Sam Halliday, and bassist/singer Kevin Baird immediately began expanding their sound on their follow-up, 2012's Beacon. However, where that album found them maturing with a softer musical palette and weightier emotionalism, Gameshow is a dynamic shift away from the buoyantly kinetic guitar-based approach of their first two albums. Which isn't to say they've completely abandoned their post-punk roots; tracks like the ferocious "Gameshow" and the dynamic "Surgery" are a perfect balance of Scary Monsters-era David Bowie and Seven and the Ragged Tiger-era Duran Duran. That said, the lion's share of Gameshow is filled with pulsing, neon-toned dance numbers that sound equal parts Giorgio Moroder and '70s Bee Gees. While name-dropping influences feels a bit too easy for the high quality of songwriting on display on Gameshow, the enthusiastic nature by which Two Door Cinema Club have clearly gravitated toward these old-school dance club sounds is worth mentioning. In that sense, the metamorphosis from garagey post-punk to hip, R&B-inflected disco also brings to mind the similar trajectory of contemporary acts like France's Phoenix and Canada's Arcade Fire. Thankfully, the album never sounds like a retro pastiche, and instead the band has found a sweet spot between vintage cool and modern sophistication. These are vibrant productions courtesy of Beacon helmer Jacknife Lee, who frames Trimble's yearning tenor croon with juicy laser-beam synths, Halliday's kinetic Nile Rodgers-esque guitars, and Baird's hip-swaying bass riffs. Cuts like "Bad Decisions" and "Fever" are catchy, falsetto-heavy groovers that bring to mind a mix of the Bee Gees' Saturday Night Fever soundtrack and Off the Wall-era Michael Jackson. Similarly, the romantic and sad-eyed "Invincible" sounds amazingly like a Justin Timberlake ballad if produced by ELO's Jeff Lynne. With Gameshow, Two Door Cinema Club ultimately balance a growing pop maturity with a stylish strut worthy of Saturday Night Fever's Tony Manero. © Matt Collar /TiVo
From
HI-RES$14.99
CD$9.99

Alternative & Indie - Released August 31, 2012 | Glassnote Entertainment Group LLC

Hi-Res
From
CD$9.99

Alternative & Indie - Released June 21, 2019 | Glassnote Entertainment Group LLC

From
HI-RES$22.49
CD$14.99

Alternative & Indie - Released September 3, 2012 | Glassnote Entertainment Group LLC

Hi-Res
From
CD$9.99

Alternative & Indie - Released June 5, 2020 | Glassnote Entertainment Group LLC

From
CD$12.99

Alternative & Indie - Released January 1, 2012 | Co-operative Music

Two Door Cinema Club returned with Beacon after a couple of years touring in support of their debut album, Tourist History. While that set of songs was already pretty sleek thanks to the production skills of Eliot James, the band opted to polish things further with the help of Jacknife Lee, who has worked with R.E.M., U2, Snow Patrol, and plenty of other epic-sounding artists. With Lee's assistance, the band made Beacon a more sophisticated-sounding set of songs: witness the clever chord changes and harmonies on "Next Year," the more prominent electronics on "Wake Up," the intriguing percussion on "Pyramid," and the big brass swells on "Sun," which make the song a knowing nod to the band's '80s influences. However, this polish comes at a price, and much of the nervy, scrappy energy that made Tourist History so appealing is missing from Beacon. Songs such as "Handshake" are never less than pleasant examples of the band's bright, bouncy dance-rock, but they're not particularly distinctive; on the other hand, attempts to rock harder like "Someday" aren't entirely successful either -- the guitars don't just sound heavy, they sound weighed down, and the gulf between them and Alex Trimble's soothing vocals is nearly as big as the disconnect between the music and Beacon's borderline-saucy album cover. Two Door Cinema Club fare better when they stick closer to their wheelhouse of charming electro-guitar pop, which they do on the bittersweet "Sleep Alone" and the pretty title track. There's nothing overtly bad about Beacon; it shows that Two Door Cinema Club still have a remarkable knack for winsome melodies and harmonies set to kinetic beats. It just doesn't have the spark that Tourist History had, even if it's a more accomplished album overall. © Heather Phares /TiVo
From
HI-RES$4.49
CD$2.99

Alternative & Indie - Released January 1, 2013 | Glassnote Entertainment Group LLC

Hi-Res
From
HI-RES$22.49
CD$14.99

Alternative & Indie - Released September 3, 2012 | Glassnote Entertainment Group LLC

Hi-Res
From
HI-RES$14.99
CD$9.99

Alternative & Indie - Released October 14, 2016 | Glassnote Entertainment Group LLC

Hi-Res
Ireland's Two Door Cinema Club transform into a glitzy disco and synth pop-infused powerhouse on their third studio album, 2016's Gameshow. Having garnered favorable attention for their infectious, dance-rock-heavy 2010 debut, Tourist History, the trio of singer/guitarist/programmer Alex Trimble, guitarist/singer Sam Halliday, and bassist/singer Kevin Baird immediately began expanding their sound on their follow-up, 2012's Beacon. However, where that album found them maturing with a softer musical palette and weightier emotionalism, Gameshow is a dynamic shift away from the buoyantly kinetic guitar-based approach of their first two albums. Which isn't to say they've completely abandoned their post-punk roots; tracks like the ferocious "Gameshow" and the dynamic "Surgery" are a perfect balance of Scary Monsters-era David Bowie and Seven and the Ragged Tiger-era Duran Duran. That said, the lion's share of Gameshow is filled with pulsing, neon-toned dance numbers that sound equal parts Giorgio Moroder and '70s Bee Gees. While name-dropping influences feels a bit too easy for the high quality of songwriting on display on Gameshow, the enthusiastic nature by which Two Door Cinema Club have clearly gravitated toward these old-school dance club sounds is worth mentioning. In that sense, the metamorphosis from garagey post-punk to hip, R&B-inflected disco also brings to mind the similar trajectory of contemporary acts like France's Phoenix and Canada's Arcade Fire. Thankfully, the album never sounds like a retro pastiche, and instead the band has found a sweet spot between vintage cool and modern sophistication. These are vibrant productions courtesy of Beacon helmer Jacknife Lee, who frames Trimble's yearning tenor croon with juicy laser-beam synths, Halliday's kinetic Nile Rodgers-esque guitars, and Baird's hip-swaying bass riffs. Cuts like "Bad Decisions" and "Fever" are catchy, falsetto-heavy groovers that bring to mind a mix of the Bee Gees' Saturday Night Fever soundtrack and Off the Wall-era Michael Jackson. Similarly, the romantic and sad-eyed "Invincible" sounds amazingly like a Justin Timberlake ballad if produced by ELO's Jeff Lynne. With Gameshow, Two Door Cinema Club ultimately balance a growing pop maturity with a stylish strut worthy of Saturday Night Fever's Tony Manero. © Matt Collar /TiVo
From
CD$1.49

Alternative & Indie - Released May 22, 2019 | Glassnote Entertainment Group LLC

From
CD$0.99

Alternative & Indie - Released March 19, 2019 | Glassnote Entertainment Group LLC

From
HI-RES$4.49
CD$2.99

Alternative & Indie - Released January 1, 2013 | Glassnote Entertainment Group LLC

Hi-Res
From
CD$0.99

Alternative & Indie - Released June 19, 2019 | Glassnote Entertainment Group LLC

From
HI-RES$4.49
CD$2.99

Alternative & Indie - Released October 28, 2016 | Glassnote Entertainment Group LLC

Hi-Res
From
HI-RES$1.49
CD$0.99

Alternative & Indie - Released September 30, 2016 | Glassnote Entertainment Group LLC

Hi-Res
From
CD$2.99

Alternative & Indie - Released March 23, 2018 | Glassnote Entertainment Group LLC