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Pop - Released September 1, 2017 | Columbia

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Pop - Released September 12, 2014 | Columbia

The Script's fourth studio album, 2014's No Sound Without Silence, finds the Irish outfit moving somewhat away from the bright, R&B-influenced production of 2012's #3 and back toward the anthemic and heartfelt melodic rock of their first two albums. Once again showcasing the talents of lead singer/songwriter Danny O'Donoghue (freshly relieved of his duties as judge on The Voice UK), guitarist Mark Sheehan, and drummer Glen Power, No Sound Without Silence was produced by the band along with primary assistance from longtime collaborator Andrew Frampton, who had previously worked on all three of the Script's albums. Largely written and recorded while on tour, the album has an organic, back to basics vibe that sounds well-suited to live performance. There's also one track, the rousing "Flares," co-written by One Republic's Ryan Tedder, that speaks to the earnestness and emotional depth on display throughout all of No Sound Without Silence. Many of the cuts here, including the uplifting "The Energy Never Dies," and the equally heartfelt "Never Seen Anything 'Quite Like You'," while certainly benefiting from a pristine studio sheen, nonetheless retain an unmistakably live aesthetic, with a nice balance of acoustic and electric instrumentation. There's a widescreen warmth to the production on the album that brings to mind the resonance of an old-school orchestra hall. Fittingly, on a few of the songs here, including "Paint the Town Green," and "Hail Rain or Sunshine, the Script delve into their Irish roots, imbuing their exuberant rock with a rollicking, Celtic influence, replete with fiddle and percussive, traditional Irish dance rhythms. Ultimately, No Sound Without a Silence is the sound of the Script rediscovering their roots. As O'Donoghue sings on "Hail Rain or Sunshine," "You may see this place and find no worth, but it's our little piece of Heaven here on Earth." ~ Matt Collar
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Pop/Rock - Released September 7, 2012 | Epic - Phonogenic

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Pop - Released November 17, 2017 | Columbia

The Script's fifth album, 2017's Freedom Child, is a vibrant, immediately engaging effort that finds them nicely balancing their various influences, from slick dance-pop to kinetic R&B and thoughtful, crowd-pleasing anthems. Produced by the band along with veteran studio wiz Andrew Frampton (Olly Murs, David Guetta, Natasha Bedingfield), Freedom Child showcases some of the Irish group's most instantly memorable compositions to date with songs like the driving, reggae-meets-EDM opener "No Man Is an Island," the passionately uplifting "Rock the World," and the hip-hop-tinged, handclap-ready "Mad Love," with its Anthony Kiedis-esque rap. Similar cuts, like the yearning "Rain," the falsetto-accented "Love Not Lovers," and the dramatic "Written in the Scars" should appeal to longtime fans, as they bring to mind the soulful rock meets R&B of their debut album. It also doesn't hurt that lead singer/songwriter Danny O'Donoghue sounds tangibly present on each track, his voice full and warm with resonance, bringing to mind a surprisingly pleasant combination of Maroon 5's Adam Levine and neo-crooner Michael Bublé. And while much of the appeal of Freedom Child lies in the catchy nature of the songs, it's not simply a frothy, club-centric confection. On the contrary, the Script included a number of weighty subjects, from the more personal ("Wonders," "Written in the Scars") all the way up to the current state of political and social unrest around the world. Along with the rousing title track, it's a point of view most explicitly conveyed on the earnestly delivered "Divided States of America." O'Donoghue sings "They built these walls so high/Let's reach across that great divide/Brick by brick, stone by stone/Let's build a bridge to get us home." Ultimately, it's that combination of aspirational uplift and hooky pop savvy that makes the fertile ground of Freedom Child feel both charmingly familiar and new. ~ Matt Collar
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Pop - Released August 11, 2017 | Columbia

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Pop - Released April 18, 2018 | Columbia

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Pop - Released January 18, 2011 | Phonogenic

Despite bursting onto the scene in 2008 with endorsements from Pharrell Williams and a history of working with R&B producers Teddy Riley and Rodney Jerkins, Dublin three-piece the Script have since become one of the biggest bands in the U.K. thanks instead to their MOR brand of soft rock that the likes of Goo Goo Dolls and Matchbox Twenty failed to translate from the States over ten years previously. Following an 18-month absence, during which the previous five singles from their chart-topping eponymous debut never left the airwaves, Danny O'Donoghue, Marc Sheehan, and Glen Power return with their follow-up, Science & Faith. Based on the struggle in relationships between men and women rather than the religious themes the title suggests, the trio's second album isn't exactly a radical departure, with previous producers Andrew Frampton and Steve Kipner back on board for another set of radio-friendly harmonious guitar pop tracks, all of which sound like they could have been lifted from several other artists' back catalog. Indeed, opening track "You Won't Feel a Thing" veers into the stadium rock territory of fellow Irishmen U2, lead single "For the First Time" is the kind of heartfelt acoustic ballad Snow Patrol have based a career on, and the likes of "Exit Wounds" and "Long Gone and Moved On" echo the more commercial moments of Coldplay's X&Y. Only the military-esque rhythms of "This = Love" offer anything remotely original, with even the bandmembers themselves admitting that the album is more of a continuation of their sound than a transition. Of course, there's no denying that the Script know their way around a melody, and the likes of the soaring string-led "Walk Away" and hook-laden heartbreak of "Nøthing" feature the kind of epic killer choruses that helped their first album shift a million copies. But swamped by the same safe, repetitive, and unadventurous production, the majority of the ten tracks are indistinguishable from one another, making Science & Faith a solid but pedestrian and uninspiring affair. ~ Jon O'Brien
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Pop/Rock - Released September 8, 2008 | Phonogenic

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Pop - Released September 20, 2019 | Columbia

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Pop - Released July 14, 2017 | Columbia

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Pop - Released July 21, 2014 | Columbia

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Pop - Released August 4, 2017 | Columbia

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Pop - Released November 8, 2019 | Columbia

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Pop - Released December 22, 2017 | Columbia

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Pop - Released July 28, 2017 | Columbia

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Pop - Released October 4, 2019 | Columbia

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Pop - Released March 16, 2018 | Columbia

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Pop - Released August 4, 2017 | Columbia

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Pop - Released December 8, 2017 | Columbia

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Pop - Released August 25, 2017 | Columbia

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