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Soundtracks - Released November 3, 2017 | Silva Screen Records

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Soundtracks - Released July 26, 2011 | Silva Screen Records

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Soundtracks - Released July 17, 2007 | Silva Screen Records

True aficionados of film scores may suggest that a better title for this six-disc set would be "100 Popular Film Themes" or "Themes from 100 Popular Films." It's a chronological survey, but there is an emphasis on the themes from the age of the blockbuster (i.e., the late '70s onward). Silva Screen's specialty is symphonic recordings of movie themes and music highlights sold as an alternative to the actual, full movie soundtrack/score recordings, and what's here is pulled from those recordings. Even in some of the highlights from the 1950s and early '60s, the full symphonic, stereo sound of these excerpts is so different from the original, monaural soundtracks and the scrappy studio orchestras that the music seems almost too "Evening at the Pops" or 101 Strings-ish. For everything else, however, the sound and energy are just as good as the originals. Memorable themes such as the guitar Cavatina from The Deer Hunter and Tubular Bells from The Exorcist break up the symphonic sound. There's plenty here that most people will recognize, even if they haven't seen all of the most popular movies of the last 30 years. John Williams, Danny Elfman, and Hans Zimmer are well represented, as are their elders John Barry, Bernard Herrmann, and Jerry Goldsmith. A few of the foreign films thrown into the mix are The Dambusters, Merry Christmas, Mr. Lawrence, Cinema Paradiso, and Les Choristes. Nitpickers will argue that the unforgettable music from Where Angels Fear to Tread and The Red Violin are greater than that of Air Force One and The Da Vinci Code, and they'll complain about the scarcity of picks from Hollywood's Golden Age. Korngold is completely missing from this collection, as are Miklós Rózsa before 1959's Ben-Hur and the theme from the 1940 Mark of Zorro, which appears on other Silva Screen compilations. But for more casual fans of film music and fans of movies in general, it will remind them of some entertaining hours spent at the movies.
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Miscellaneous - Released January 1, 1994 | Silva Screen Records

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Soundtracks - Released February 21, 2012 | Silva Screen Records

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Soundtracks - Released February 26, 2013 | Silva Screen Records

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Sacred Vocal Music - Released March 15, 2018 | Art House Records

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Soundtracks - Released August 18, 1998 | Silva Screen Records

A beautifully performed and recorded collection of some of James Horner's best motion picture underscore work spread over two discs. While he is certainly derivative at times and has a severe tendency to recycle his own material as often as possible, there is no doubt that he can turn in a moving film score -- and easily adapt to romance, action, or grand ideas. The Enya-esque Titanic score aside (only two sections are included here), this well-chosen double set includes selections from Braveheart, Apollo 13, Star Trek II, Battle Beyond the Stars (its essential thematic predecessor), and even Red Heat and Commando. Also sampled is another favorite Horner score, The Rocketeer. ~ Steven McDonald
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Soundtracks - Released February 24, 2017 | Silva Screen Records

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Soundtracks - Released March 13, 2012 | Silva Screen Records

The first thing that potential consumers should know about The Complete Harry Potter Film Music Collection is that all of the pieces are performed by the City of Prague Philharmonic Orchestra, and not collected from the official film soundtracks, which were recorded under the watchful eyes and ears of composers John Williams, Patrick Doyle, Nicholas Hooper, and Alexandre Desplat. That said, the collection hits on all of the most important beats from each of the eight films, including multiple iterations of Williams' iconic "Hedwig's Theme" and the ambitious Prisoner of Azkaban highlight "Double Trouble," resulting in a listening experience that may not be entirely authentic, but satisfies nonetheless. ~ James Christopher Monger
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Soundtracks - Released June 24, 2016 | Silva Screen Records

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Miscellaneous - Released April 24, 2015 | Silva Screen Records

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Soundtracks - Released May 3, 2011 | Silva Screen Records

The mental disconnect between the "Celtic" content of this release and its performance by the City of Prague Philharmonic Orchestra (no conductor is listed) fades when you notice that it's not Celtic music in general that's on offer, but rather, with just one exception, cinematic scores that present images of the Celtic world. These are so frequent by now as to be considered common property, even for Czechs, and the category is a very blurry one. The inclusion of My Heart Will Go On, from the soundtrack of Titanic, is Celtic only by virtue of the uilleann pipes that accompany the departure of the star-crossed lovers from...England, and some of the other selections (the end title of The Shawshank Redemption soundtrack, for example) have equally tenuous connections with the theme. The album is clearly intended for fans of the Celtic sound, but it might also be of interest to anyone curious about the meaning of the Celtic meme in world culture at large. One might ask, for example, why the Lord of the Rings films were given Celtic musical content, sampled on a couple of tracks here. Most of the composers are American, although there are a few actual Celts involved (Enya, Sean O'Riada), and the temporal mix, though centered on the 1980s and 1990s, runs as far back as John Ford's The Quiet Man. The sole exception to the cinematic content is a segment of music from Riverdance, which originated as an interlude on the Eurovision Song Contest in 1994. This brings the proceedings to a zippy close, and indeed the main complaint here is that the sequence of flutes and pipes drifting through dreamy music is rarely interrupted by faster pieces. Of course, for those interested in setting a Celtic mood, this will not be a complaint at all. An enjoyable budget crossover release.
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Soundtracks - Released June 10, 2014 | Silva Screen Records

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Soundtracks - Released June 15, 2010 | Silva Screen Records

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Classical - Released January 1, 1999 | Decca (UMO)

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Soundtracks - Released April 10, 2007 | Silva Screen Records

Not a knock off, but rather a truly terrific collection of Bernard Herrmann's greatest hits performed with power and considerable delicacy by the City of Prague Philharmonic under either Paul Bateman, Nic Raine, or James Fitzpatrick, this disc will delight film score connoisseurs. It's true that the tempos are sometimes slightly faster, the rhythms are sometimes less relentless, and the colors are often considerably more dazzling than Herrmann's own tempos, rhythms, and colors, but it's likewise true that the conducting triumvirate is remarkably faithful to the spirit of the scores and that the Czech orchestra is amazingly sympathetic to the soul of the music. Listen to the brash bluster of the Overture to Citizen Kane, to the searing sensuality of the "Scene D'Amore" from Vertigo, to the anguished angularity of the main title music from North by Northwest, to the radiant romanticism of the "Main Title" and Finale from The Ghost and Mrs. Muir, and, above all, to the screeching strings in the "Shower Sequence" from Psycho: these are among the best moments in Herrmann's music and the triumvirate and the Czechs carry them off magnificently. Silva Screen's on digital sound is very, very impressive -- very big, very loud, very deep, very colorful, very present -- but it's not as impressive as the Phase Four stereo sound London gave Herrmann in a series of recordings they made together in the late '60s and early '70s.
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Soundtracks - Released July 30, 2013 | Silva Screen Records

Booklet
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Soundtracks - Released January 1, 1995 | Silva Screen Records

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Soundtracks - Released December 15, 2009 | Silva Screen Records