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Alternative & Indie - Released December 5, 2011 | Nonesuch

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 4F de Télérama - Sélection Les Inrocks
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Alternative & Indie - Released December 2, 2011 | Nonesuch

Booklet Distinctions 4F de Télérama - Sélection Les Inrocks
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Alternative & Indie - Released October 9, 2012 | Nonesuch

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Alternative & Indie - Released June 28, 2019 | Nonesuch

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Dan and Pat have been writing the handbook for rock’n’roll for almost 20 years. A decade after leaving their hometown Akron in Ohio for Nashville, the Black Keys have produced Let’s Rock, a sort of return to the roots of original classic rock that pays homage to the electric guitar from the very first minute to the very last. In other words, the title of the album says it all. After both having worked with various other musicians, the pair have accepted one another’s infidelities and are back together. Dan Auerbach founded the Easy Eye Sound label named after his studio in Nashville, released his second solo album, Waiting on a Song, and produced a fine selection of albums for Yola, Shannon & The Clams, Dee White, Sonny Smith, Robert Finley and Gibson Brothers. Meanwhile, Pat Carney produced and recorded music with Calvin Johnson Michelle Branch, Tobias Jesso, Jr., Jessy Wilson, Tennis, Repeat Repeat, Wild Belle, Sad Planets Turbo Fruits and many more, and last but not least, he wrote the theme-song for BoJack Horseman on Netflix. After this success, Auerbach admits that it felt like the perfect time for their reunion, “That period really cleared my mind, and it made it so much more enjoyable when I got back together with Pat, because we’d had all that time off. I feel like the record is a testament to that feeling”.Let’s Rock revisits all the great big seventies guitar sounds that the duo admire. A vast array ranges from Glenn Schwartz and Joe Walsh from James Gang to Billy Gibbons from ZZ Top and Stealers Wheel (Sit Around and Miss You is very similar to Stuck in the Middle With You), T. Rex, Link Wray (Polydor period), Blue Öyster Cult and many more. “I didn’t want to overthink it” adds Auerbach. “I wanted it to feel spontaneous. I wanted to be able to record something not dissimilar to ‘Louie Louie’ and be perfectly happy with it. I was looking for the Troggs!”. “Funny, I was looking for the Stooges ‘Down on the Street’”, laughs Carney, who insists on his love for “big and dumb songs. They’re my favourite. I think on this record Dan and I came to a similar place in terms of what we wanted.  I was sitting in my studio for the last year just playing electric guitar, and for the first time in a while, Dan was playing a lot of electric guitar. The record is like a homage to electric guitar [..] We took a simple approach and trimmed all the fat like we used to”. All that now remains is the meat, the best bit! © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Alternative & Indie - Released May 12, 2014 | Nonesuch

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Alternative & Indie - Released December 18, 2020 | Nonesuch

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Alternative & Indie - Released May 18, 2010 | Nonesuch

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Alternative & Indie - Released December 1, 2016 | Fat Possum

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Alternative & Indie - Released December 1, 2016 | Fat Possum

The Black Keys shot to fame in 2010, packing out huge stadiums with their sixth album Brothers. The album artwork paid tribute to a controversial Howlin’ Wolf album (This is Howlin’ Wolf’s New Album. He Doesn’t Like It…) and it was a sign. A sign that all the music they love stems from the blues, even if they also explore other avenues. That’s exactly how they started, playing the blues as a duo in their native industrial Midwest (Akron, Ohio), while dreaming of electric juke joints in Mississippi. The Black Keys have never expressed their love for the blues as much as on Thickfreakness, their second album (and for blues fans, their best). The record where Dan Auerbach carved steaks out of the soft belly of the blues by playing guitar haché with an overpowering sound. The one where drummer Pat Carney seemed to be playing to calm his nerves after a day at the factory. They had faith, rage and hunger in their stomachs, tired and hungry for success. As much inspired by the electric blues of North Mississippi (notably Junior Kimbrough) as by proto-punk (from The Stooges to The Sonics, covering their song Have Love Will Travel), the Black Keys wrote their own legend. Listening to this record on top volume is like sticking your head out of the window of a car speeding down a sun-burned road. Only without all the midges in your face. © Stéphane Deschamps/Qobuz
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Alternative & Indie - Released April 1, 2008 | Nonesuch

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Alternative & Indie - Released January 29, 2008 | Alive Records

As minimal two-man blues-rock bands go, this has to be near the top of the heap. The problem with minimal two-man blues-rock outfits (and there have been more of them than you think) is that they're, well, usually too minimal, with thin garage sound and a shortage of variety. The Black Keys' sound, impressively, is not too thin (though it is garage-ish), and there's enough deft incorporation of funk, soul, and hard rock into the harsh juke joint-ish core to avoid monotony. Most importantly, Dan Auerbach has a genuinely fine, powerful blues voice, sometimes approximating a white, slightly smoother Howlin' Wolf (particularly on the opener, "Busted"). Auerbach's a good guitarist, too, conjuring suitably harsh and busy (and sometimes heavily reverbed) riffs out of what sounds like a cheap but effectively harsh amp. Patrick Carney's drums might be the cruder component of this two-man band, but they keep the sound earthy without sounding sloppily punkish for the hell of it, as too many such groups searching for the blues-punk fusion do. The very occasional insertion of hip-hop snippets seems neither here nor there, and the cover of the Beatles' "She Said, She Said" seems like an odd choice. But overall it's quite cool raunchy electric blues with more vigor and imagination than similarly raw, elderly Southern juke joint artists who came into vogue starting in the 1990s. And it's way fresher than the standard bar band blues-rockers with slicker execution and more reverence for blues clichés. © Richie Unterberger /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released May 2, 2006 | Fat Possum

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Rock - Released September 12, 2006 | Nonesuch

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Alternative & Indie - Released March 7, 2019 | Nonesuch

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Alternative & Indie - Released May 18, 2010 | Nonesuch

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Alternative & Indie - Released May 9, 2014 | Nonesuch

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Rock - Released September 12, 2006 | Nonesuch

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Alternative & Indie - Released October 26, 2011 | Nonesuch

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Alternative & Indie - Released April 25, 2019 | Nonesuch

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Alternative & Indie - Released May 16, 2019 | Nonesuch

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The Black Keys in the magazine