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Pop - Released July 1, 1971 | Island Def Jam

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Rock - Released August 1, 1973 | Mercury Records

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Rock - Released February 12, 1972 | Mercury Records

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Pop - Released September 23, 1970 | Island Def Jam

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Rock - Released November 8, 2019 | Island Def Jam

Though it appears in the aftermath of their dissolution in 2014, and the deaths of both actual Allman brothers, Duane and Gregg, this 50th anniversary retrospective box set is arguably the only career overview of the band one can call representative. Arranged over ten LPs or five compact discs, Trouble No More examines in depth each incarnation and stage of the pioneering rockers. It convincingly formulates the argument that no other American band accomplished more musically (especially live) by seamlessly marrying rock, blues, jazz, and R&B to each other and to extended improvisation. This set compiles 61 Allman Brothers Band classics, live performances, and rarities -- including seven previously unreleased tracks -- all painstakingly remastered, with and a hefty 88-page book full of photos and a lengthy historical essay by ABB historian John Lynskey that recaps all 13 incarnations of the band's lineup. Lynskey co-produced the set with fellow ABB authorities Bill Levenson and Kirk West. Sequenced chronologically, the music and its accompanying visuals offer a detailed, rounded portrait of this legendary band at their best in all incarnations. It forever puts to bed the argument that after Brothers and Sisters in 1972 they were done creatively until Warren Haynes signed up for their second re-formation in 1989. The set is bookended by versions of the Muddy Waters-penned title track. Disc one is an unreleased studio demo from 1969, while disc five's electrifying closer is taken from the farewell shows at the Beacon Theater. The demo is interesting, mainly for the brief, raw interplay between guitarists Dickey Betts and Duane Allman. Some listeners may be surprised to find only the studio version of "Whipping Post" here, but given how many long jams are included, it's a small omission; besides, "In Memory of Elizabeth Reed" from the same Fillmore East concerts is included. There is a previously unissued version of "Mountain Jam" from the Watkins Glenn Music Festival in 1973 that has never been issued before either. At just over 12 minutes, it's nowhere near as long as the one from Eat a Peach, but it does offer the Chuck Leavell version of the band with Betts, Gregg, Jaimoe, Butch Trucks, and bassist Lamar Williams. at their best with three special guests: guitarists Robbie Robertson, Jerry Garcia, and Bob Weir! There are excellent choices from the albums Win Lose or Draw and Enlightened Rogues (otherwise spotty documents) that showcase Betts' fine songwriting on "High Falls," Crazy Love," "Pegasus," and "Can't Take It with You," co-composed with actor Don Johnson. The final disc houses most of the unreleased material, all of it cut live during the Peach Records years, between 2000-2014. The ten-minute read of Fenton Robinson's "Loan Me a Dime" with Derek Trucks and Jimmy Herring on guitars is one of two tunes with this lineup, who offer up their own take on the tune that Duane played on for Boz Scaggs' self-titled debut in 1969. Likewise a 1999 show, with Betts and Jack Pearson on guitars, delivers a read of the latter's "I'm Not Crying" and features the composer's impassioned vocals. While Trouble No More is almost certainly for hardcore fans only (given its cost and [beautifully] assembled excess), it is also the only Allman Brothers Band compilation ultimately worth owning for those same enthusiasts. © Thom Jurek /TiVo
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Pop - Released November 4, 1969 | Island Def Jam

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Rock - Released July 29, 2014 | Island Def Jam

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Pop - Released February 12, 1972 | Island Def Jam

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Rock - Released February 14, 2014 | Epic - Legacy

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Pop/Rock - Released May 3, 1994 | Epic

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After a year of personal and personnel problems, the Allman Brothers Band got back together to record the surprisingly consistent live-in-the-studio venture Where It All Begins. It lacks the ambition and stretch of Seven Turns or Shades of Two Worlds, along with their peaks, but it is still a solidly consistent album, driven by some of the virtues of live spontaneity. Highlights include Gregg Allman's frank drug song "All Night Train," the Bo Diddley-beat-driven "No One to Run With," and the glorious dual-guitar workout "Back Where It All Begins." © Bruce Eder /TiVo
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Rock - Released June 25, 2013 | Mercury Records

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Rock - Released February 5, 2016 | Peach Records Associates, LLC

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Rock - Released October 22, 1991 | Universal Records

The record industry's blatantly greedy ploy of remastering and "upgrading" CDs is shameful. The sonics are usually improved, but the CDs could have been mastered properly the first time. But then fans wouldn't buy the same titles twice. The Allman Brothers Band's indispensable compilation A Decade of Hits 1969-1979 was reissued in 2000, just nine years after the original release. The remastered 2000 edition still features the same 16 songs, but the packaging and liner notes include an essay by Guitar World journalist Alan Paul, photos, and detailed recording credits. It would be easy to argue that individual albums like Idlewild South, Live at Fillmore East, Eat a Peach, or Brothers and Sisters are more cohesive artistic statements, but no self-respecting rock & roll fan should be without a copy of A Decade of Hits 1969-1979, which includes the cream of those albums. It's impossible to go wrong with one CD featuring Gregg Allman's harrowing "Whipping Post" and gorgeous "Midnight Rider," Dickey Betts' soaring "Ramblin' Man," and the lovely instrumentals "Jessica" and "In Memory of Elizabeth Reed," let alone the blues covers "Statesboro Blues" and "One Way Out," which many people probably don't realize are covers because the band embodies them so much. Fans shouldn't have much of a problem recognizing the 2000 version. The cover featuring the band logo stitched on the denim jacket is still intact, but the white lettering is laid out a little differently on both the front and back covers. Plus, the shrink-wrap has an identifying sticker. Better still, just look at the copyright date. The first pressing's liner notes include a typographical error; there's a noticeable gap within the essay text where the Enlightened Rogues title is missing. © Bret Adams /TiVo
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Rock - Released October 30, 2020 | Peach Records Associates, LLC

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Pop - Released February 1, 1979 | Island Def Jam

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Rock - Released June 20, 1989 | Mercury Records

Spanning four discs and 55 tracks, Dreams is one of those rare box sets that tells a story while delivering the definitive word on its subject. Its success has a lot to do with its status as Polygram/Bill Levinson's sequel to the acclaimed hit Crossroads, which summarized Eric Clapton's winding career perfectly. They follow the same approach here, gathering pre-Allman Brothers Band recordings from the clan, including cuts by the Allman Joys, selecting the hits from the classic years, and adding stray cuts by solo projects to the mix. It's a smart move and it results in a terrific box that truly offers the definitive word on one of the longest-running dramas in Southern rock. Yes, the Allmans reunited rather successfully after this box, so none of that material is here, but it's not missed -- this is the story of the classic band. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Pop/Rock - Released July 3, 1990 | Epic

The Allman Brothers Band's comeback album, and their best blues-based outing since Idlewild South that restored a lot of their reputation. With Tom Dowd running the session, and the group free to make the music they wanted to, they ended up producing this bold, rock-hard album, made up mostly of songs by Dickey Betts (with contributions by new keyboardman Johnny Neel and lead guitarist Warren Haynes), almost every one of them a winner. Apart from the rippling opening number, "Good Clean Fun," which he co-authored, Gregg Allman's contribution is limited to singing and the organ, but the band seem more confident than ever, ripping through numbers like "Low Down Dirty Mean," "Shine It On," and "Let Me Ride" like they were inventing blues-rock here, and the Ornette Coleman-inspired "True Gravity" is their best instrumental since "Jessica." © Bruce Eder /TiVo
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Pop - Released August 1, 1975 | Island Def Jam

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Rock - Released August 9, 1991 | Epic

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Pop - Released November 1, 1976 | Island Def Jam

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