Your basket is empty

Categories :

Similar artists

Albums

From
CD$12.99

Rock - Released May 15, 1995 | Echo

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
Tearing by at a breakneck speed, I Should Coco is a spectacularly eclectic debut by Supergrass, a trio barely out of their teens. Sure, the unbridled energy of the album illustrates that the band is young, yet what really illustrates how young the bandmembers are is how they borrow from their predecessors. Supergrass treat the Buzzcocks, the Beatles, Elton John, David Bowie, Blur, and Madness as if they were all the same thing -- they don't make any distinction between what is cool and what isn't, they just throw everything together. Consequently, the jittery "Caught by the Fuzz" slams next to the music hall rave-up "Mansize Rooster," the trippy psychedelia of "Sofa (Of My Lethargy)," the heavy stomp of "Lenny," and the bona fide teen anthem "Alright." I Should Coco is the sound of adolescence, but performed with a surprising musical versatility that makes the record's exuberant energy all the more infectious. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
From
CD$14.49

Pop - Released April 21, 1997 | Echo

Supergrass' debut album, I Should Coco, rushed by at such a blinding speed that some listeners didn't notice the melodic complexity of its best songs. On its second album, the cleverly titled In It for the Money, Supergrass brought the songs to the forefront, slowing the tempos considerably and constructing a varied, textured album that makes the band's ambition and skill abundantly clear. From the droning mantra of the opening title track, it's clear that the band has delved deeply into psychedelia, and hints of Magical Mystery Tour are evident throughout the album, from swirling organs and gurgling wah-wahs to punchy horn charts and human beatboxes. In fact, Supergrass has substituted the punky rush of I Should Coco for such sonic details, and while that means the band only occasionally touches upon the breakneck pace of its debut (the hard-driving "Richard III"), it also deepens its joyful exuberance with subtle songs and remarkably accomplished musicianship. There might not be a "Caught by the Fuzz" or "Alright" on In It for the Money, but that's not a problem, since the bright explosion of "Sun Hits the Sky" and the nervy "Tonight" are just as energetic, and the album features introspective numbers like the gorgeous "Late in the Day" and "It's Not Me" that give it substantial weight. And even with all this musical maturity, Supergrass hasn't sacrificed its good-natured humor, as the detailed production and the bizarre closer, "Sometimes I Make You Sad," make abundantly clear. Sometimes, maturity turns out to be everything it's supposed to be. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
From
HI-RES$12.99
CD$8.99

Rock - Released November 27, 2020 | Supergrass Records

Hi-Res
Before the planet was put under double lockdown, there was... live music! To immerse yourself in this Live on Other Planets is to enjoy a life-saving reminder that the mental and physical power of a good old concert will never be replaced by a live session on social networks, watched on a 10cm smartphone screen... Supergrass have always had a symbiotic relationship with the stage. For Gaz Coombes's band, who are forever fine-tuning their studio albums, and for their audiences, concerts are an experience in their own right. After officially cashing out at the end of a legendary concert at La Cigale in Paris on 11 June 2010, Supergrass returned to the stage in 2019 for a global reunion tour which was interrupted in spring 2020 by the virus. With its crisp sound and magnificent performances, Live on other Planets goes beyond the mere "live album", to remind those who have forgotten that amidst the Britpop tsunami that shook the 1990's, Supergrass was a true marvel. More melodic than Blur, more restless than Oasis, and more eclectic than Pulp, this group started out with punk-infused pop, before making its rock more sophisticated by rounding it out with increasingly diverse influences like glam rock, funk, psychedelic pop or Sixties rock... But the real magic was that for all that Supergrass loved the Stones, the Beatles, Bowie, the Kinks, the Who and the Jam, they still sounded like Supergrass. Finally, this 2020 live recording also showcases the talent of the impressive melodist Gaz Coombes: scrolling through his hits like Caught by the Fuzz, Moving, Grace, Alright, Pumping on Your Stereo or Late in the Day. A class live act. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
From
CD$38.49

Rock - Released May 15, 1995 | Echo

Tearing by at a breakneck speed, I Should Coco is a spectacularly eclectic debut by Supergrass, a trio barely out of their teens. Sure, the unbridled energy of the album illustrates that the band is young, yet what really illustrates how young the bandmembers are is how they borrow from their predecessors. Supergrass treat the Buzzcocks, the Beatles, Elton John, David Bowie, Blur, and Madness as if they were all the same thing -- they don't make any distinction between what is cool and what isn't, they just throw everything together. Consequently, the jittery "Caught by the Fuzz" slams next to the music hall rave-up "Mansize Rooster," the trippy psychedelia of "Sofa (Of My Lethargy)," the heavy stomp of "Lenny," and the bona fide teen anthem "Alright." I Should Coco is the sound of adolescence, but performed with a surprising musical versatility that makes the record's exuberant energy all the more infectious. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
From
CD$15.49

Rock - Released January 24, 2020 | Echo

A quarter of a century after their stupendous debut with the masterpiece I Should Coco, Supergrass remind us that they were oddballs of the 90s Britpop scene. The trio, which later would later become a quartet, have nothing to envy of Oasis, Blur or Pulp. They’re more like the distant and mouthy cousins of The Who… With The Strange Ones, Gaz Coombes’ band touches on its entire career through thirty tracks, from hit singles, explosive live performances, B sides and unreleased songs. This compilation is in fact the ‘lite’ version of an XXL box set (counting over 200 tracks!), published in CD and vinyl and not digitally. © Max Dembo/Qobuz
From
CD$10.49

Rock - Released June 13, 2005 | Echo

Supergrass have a hard time coming down from their musical highs. Every time they release a giddy, irresistible pop album, they repent on the next record, crafting a moodier response. This happened with their 1995 debut, I Should Coco, which engendered two hangover records: the sprawling, ambitious, yet thrilling In It for the Money and its hazy, unfocused 1999 Supergrass, which, despite the instant glitter classic "Pumping on Your Stereo," was so scattered it sounded as if the guys weren't sure if they wanted to be a band at all anymore. They sprung back with 2002's Life on Other Planets, a truly wonderful pop album that was their best since their debut, but for 2005's Road to Rouen, they once again retreat from the bright colors and sunny melodies and turn toward darker textures. But there's a big difference here: where Supergrass drifted aimlessly, Road to Rouen is a tight, sharply focused album with purpose and momentum. It may have two long epics in the opening "Tales of Endurance, Pts. 4, 5 & 6" and "Roxy," clocking in at 5:31 and 6:17, respectively, but the record lasts just over 35 minutes, and there's a mastery of tone, as the group creates a warm, trippy, late-night vibe and then never lets it flag over the course of nine songs. They have never shown such control on a record before -- previously, their best albums were exciting because they went all over the place, and did it well -- and it's quite intoxicating to hear them ride one groove, finding different variations within it, for an entire album. And if Road to Rouen is anything, it is not monotonous -- it may be an ideal soundtrack for night, but this is hardly a one-note, self-absorbed introspective record. "Tales of Endurance" has an infectious minor-key vamp from pianist Robert Coombes, the title track is a propulsive glammy rocker, and "Kick in the Teeth" has a jangling guitar that off-sets the jazzy, lazy "St. Petersburg," the folky "Low C," and dreamy "Fin." All the songs take varying routes to the same destination, and part of the appeal of this album is that each track sounds different, yet sounds the same. Best of all, unlike that third album, this isn't a self-serious affair -- if the pun in the title itself didn't illustrate that Supergrass have retained their sense of humor, the lively instrumental throwaway "Coffee in the Pot" surely will -- and that's why this is such a terrific little record: Supergrass have found new things to do with their sound without getting self-consciously mature or middlebrow. Road to Rouen may not be a party record, but the best of bands can do any number of sounds while still sounding like themselves, and with this excellent album, Supergrass do prove that they can do exactly that. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
From
CD$15.49

Rock - Released April 21, 1997 | Echo

Supergrass' debut album, I Should Coco, rushed by at such a blinding speed that some listeners didn't notice the melodic complexity of its best songs. On its second album, the cleverly titled In It for the Money, Supergrass brought the songs to the forefront, slowing the tempos considerably and constructing a varied, textured album that makes the band's ambition and skill abundantly clear. From the droning mantra of the opening title track, it's clear that the band has delved deeply into psychedelia, and hints of Magical Mystery Tour are evident throughout the album, from swirling organs and gurgling wah-wahs to punchy horn charts and human beatboxes. In fact, Supergrass has substituted the punky rush of I Should Coco for such sonic details, and while that means the band only occasionally touches upon the breakneck pace of its debut (the hard-driving "Richard III"), it also deepens its joyful exuberance with subtle songs and remarkably accomplished musicianship. There might not be a "Caught by the Fuzz" or "Alright" on In It for the Money, but that's not a problem, since the bright explosion of "Sun Hits the Sky" and the nervy "Tonight" are just as energetic, and the album features introspective numbers like the gorgeous "Late in the Day" and "It's Not Me" that give it substantial weight. And even with all this musical maturity, Supergrass hasn't sacrificed its good-natured humor, as the detailed production and the bizarre closer, "Sometimes I Make You Sad," make abundantly clear. Sometimes, maturity turns out to be everything it's supposed to be. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
From
CD$12.99

Rock - Released April 21, 1997 | Echo

Supergrass' debut album, I Should Coco, rushed by at such a blinding speed that some listeners didn't notice the melodic complexity of its best songs. On its second album, the cleverly titled In It for the Money, Supergrass brought the songs to the forefront, slowing the tempos considerably and constructing a varied, textured album that makes the band's ambition and skill abundantly clear. From the droning mantra of the opening title track, it's clear that the band has delved deeply into psychedelia, and hints of Magical Mystery Tour are evident throughout the album, from swirling organs and gurgling wah-wahs to punchy horn charts and human beatboxes. In fact, Supergrass has substituted the punky rush of I Should Coco for such sonic details, and while that means the band only occasionally touches upon the breakneck pace of its debut (the hard-driving "Richard III"), it also deepens its joyful exuberance with subtle songs and remarkably accomplished musicianship. There might not be a "Caught by the Fuzz" or "Alright" on In It for the Money, but that's not a problem, since the bright explosion of "Sun Hits the Sky" and the nervy "Tonight" are just as energetic, and the album features introspective numbers like the gorgeous "Late in the Day" and "It's Not Me" that give it substantial weight. And even with all this musical maturity, Supergrass hasn't sacrificed its good-natured humor, as the detailed production and the bizarre closer, "Sometimes I Make You Sad," make abundantly clear. Sometimes, maturity turns out to be everything it's supposed to be. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
From
CD$12.99

Rock - Released March 24, 2008 | Echo

After spending a dark, contemplative night on the Road to Rouen, Supergrass come crashing back to life with Diamond Hoo Ha, an album every bit as cheerfully gaudy and vulgar as its title. It all begins, as it should, with "Diamond Hoo Hah Man," a wicked send-up of the White Stripes' gonzo thump that rivals "Blue Orchid" and "Icky Thump" in its outsized swagger, while providing the touchstone for the rest of the record, not so much in its sound but in its attitude. Not that Supergrass doesn't crank the guitars here, as they offer up the stomping Stooges shuffle of "Bad Blood" and spangly "Rebel in You" in quick succession, but after this furious opening triptych, the band widens their net and lightens their touch, reconnecting with their signature impish humor that was quite deliberately missing on much of Road to Rouen despite its punning title. At times they actually overplay their mischief, overloading "Whiskey and Green Tea" with too much stylized British whimsy, it threatens to topple over on the weight of its braying brass. This isn't the only time that the band doesn't seem to fully have their urges under control, as there are a few pop tunes toward the end of the record that don't quite click as their hooks aren't finely honed. This is how Diamond Hoo Ha differs from 2002's incandescent Life on Other Planets which offered song after song that effortlessly dazzled. Here, Supergrass seem to labor a little to achieve such high times...but only toward the end of the record, which is solid and well-crafted but lacking the glorious, giddy highs the band offers at the beginning. However, that first half -- somewhat ironically ending after the jazzy soft rock sheen of "Return of Inspiration" -- holds its own with the best of Supergrass, filled with mammoth melodies and unbridled fun. It's more than enough to make Diamond Hoo Ha worth hearing, and it's just enough to illustrate the difference (and the merits) between inspiration and craft. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
From
CD$12.99

Rock - Released January 1, 1999 | Island Records (The Island Def Jam Music Group / Universal Music)

Essentially, Supergrass' eponymous third album is a refined, subdued extension of In It for the Money. Where that album was a supremely confident, head-spinning musical kaleidoscope, splendidly shifting focus from track to track, Supergrass is down to earth, mellow, and unassuming. Part of the trio's charm has always been that they're unabashedly unpretentious, since their casual attitude made their considerable musical skill all the more impressive. On Supergrass, that casualness occasionally crosses the line into laziness. It doesn't happen all that often, but there are moments on the album that feel tossed-off, such as "What Went Wrong (In Your Head)" and "Beautiful People." This is particularly evident because these also-rans are surrounded by songs that are as great as anything Supergrass has ever recorded -- the harpsichord-driven, pulsing "Your Love"; the stately, sophisticated "Shotover Hill"; the gleeful absurdity of "Jesus Came From Outta Space"; or the breezy, infectious summer single "Pumping on Your Stereo." The disparity in material also hammers home the point that Supergrass doesn't quite gel, the way their first two albums did. There were no themes behind those two records, but the performances and songs shared a similar spirit. The third album is simply a collection of moments, some spectacular and some average. While that may come as a slight disappointment, since I Should Coco and In It for the Money are two of the greatest pop albums of the '90s, the songs that work on Supergrass -- and they do account for well over half the record -- confirm that the 'Grass remain one of the most gifted, irresistible guitar pop bands of their time. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
From
CD$10.49

Rock - Released September 30, 2002 | Island Records (The Island Def Jam Music Group / Universal Music)

Supergrass makes music so effervescent and so effortlessly joyous that it's easy to take them and their skills for granted. Surely that was the case around the release of their third album, 1999's eponymous effort, which in its labored fun and weary ballads illustrated just how much hard work it was to craft records as brilliant as I Should Coco and In It for the Money. It suggested the group might have burned too bright and flamed out, but, happily, 2002's Life on Other Planets is a smashing return to form, an album giddy with the sheer pleasure of making music. What makes this all the more impressive is that this is the record that Supergrass attempted to be -- a perfect balance of the sensibility and humor of I Should Coco with the musicality and casual virtuosity of In It for the Money. Where that album felt labored and a little weary, Life on Other Planets is teeming with life. The tempos are sprightly, the hooks tumble out of the speakers, the band mixes up styles and eras, and they never, ever forget the jokes (Gaz's fleeting Elvis impression on "Seen the Light," an allusion to Spinal Tap's "All the Way Home," or the chorus of "Evening of the Day"). Sure, it's possible to spot the influence all the way through the album -- most clearly T. Rex on "Seen the Light" and "Brecon Beacons," where Gaz's warble is uncannily like Marc Bolan's -- but it never sounds exactly like their inspirations -- it all sounds like Supergrass. And Supergrass hasn't offered such pure, unabashed pop pleasure since their debut; there hasn't been an album that's this much fun in a long time. Since they've been away for a while and have never broken in the States, Supergrass has been curiously overlooked, even though they're better than 99 percent of the power pop and punk-pop bands out there (plus, their everything-old-is-new-again aesthetic can be heard in such albums as the Strokes' Is This It?). But, as this glorious record proves, there are few bands around these days who are as flat-out enjoyable as this trio. The world is a better place for having Supergrass in it. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
From
HI-RES$27.99
CD$24.49

Pop - Released April 21, 1997 | Echo

Hi-Res
From
CD$2.49

Rock - Released September 25, 2020 | Echo

From
CD$1.49

Pop - Released July 14, 2021 | Echo

From
CD$6.49

Rock - Released July 3, 2020 | Echo

From
CD$12.99

Alternative & Indie - Released April 12, 2004 | Echo

Since they had a lower profile than their peers and came across as a bunch of mates instead of serious musicians, Supergrass tended to be the most overlooked of all the major Britpop bands. They never defined the culture like Oasis or Blur, never had a following of serious-minded, clever misfits like Pulp, they weren't as sexy as Elastica, and they surely lacked the grandiose, doomed romanticism of Suede. What they were, though, was a bloody brilliant pop band. Their 1995 debut, I Should Coco, kicked harder than any record that year, and it had a bigger stylistic sprawl than any album this side of The Great Escape, which it trumped with a deliriously infectious enthusiasm -- and it was all the more impressive when the fact that Gaz Coombes and Danny Goffey were still in their teens when the cut the album. They matured at a rapid rate, refining their musicality with each of their next three records, but they never had center stage again like they did with I Should Coco. As they worked outside of the spotlight, they developed into a remarkably consistent singles band, as the generous 24-track 2004 collection Supergrass Is 10: The Best of 94-04 proves. Even their muddled eponymous third album sounds brilliant when distilled to the sweetly gorgeous "Moving" and the ridiculously intoxicating "Pumping on Your Stereo." These tunes are thrown together in a nonchronological order that contains all the A-sides apart from the U.S. radio single "Cheapskate" and the movie soundtrack selection "We Still Need More (Than Anyone Can Give)." Instead of being infuriating, this nonchronological sequencing reveals just how consistent Supergrass had been over the decade, since it forces the listener to concentrate on each individual song. Like Green Day's hits compilation International Superhits!, Supergrass Is 10 is a revelation for anybody who hasn't been paying attention, since it showcases a band that is one of best, most satisfying guitar pop groups of the last 15 years. If you haven't checked them out before, you need to get this immediately. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
From
CD$1.49

Rock - Released March 10, 2008 | Echo

From
CD$2.49

Rock - Released October 21, 2005 | Echo

From
CD$2.49

Rock - Released May 22, 2020 | Echo