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Alternative & Indie - Released April 10, 2020 | Polyvinyl Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released November 4, 2016 | Polyvinyl Records

After a group effort on the band-penned Miracle Mile, STRFKR took a different approach to their fourth LP. The bulk of the album was written in isolation by bandleader Joshua Hodges during a desert retreat to Joshua Tree. With a goal to "be in the moment," he reported embracing the feeling of being insignificant that comes with that territory. The resulting set of songs lays the foundation of Being No One, Going Nowhere, which also includes a track by drummer Keil Corcoran ("In the End") and input throughout from Corcoran and bass player Shawn Glassford. The more refined sound and reflective tone of their prior album carries over onto Being No One, Going Nowhere, and there's still no shortage of club-friendly grooves. "Satellite" rides syncopated bass, beats reinforced by claps, chilly synths, and warmer guitar through Hodges' delivery, airy and composed as he sings "Fall away from the edge of the world/Where I’m fine on my own." Things get a little glitchier on "Maps," while "Dark Days" turns out to be one of the brighter tracks, at least musically, with melodic bleeps and a driving four-on-the-floor. Opener "Tape Machine" was written for another project with friends in Amsterdam rather than in seclusion. It offers trippy funk-pop with sci-fi laser sound effects that manage to play right into the wistful tone it still produces, in keeping with the album ("I know your darkness better than you think"). Overall darker but still motivated by dance, Being No One, Going Nowhere hits a sophisticated balance of light and heavy, unsettled and hooky, feet and temper, with an electro-post-punk sheen that altogether seems very much of its time. © Marcy Donelson /TiVo
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Electronic - Released August 28, 2020 | Polyvinyl Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released December 6, 2019 | Polyvinyl Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released December 1, 2017 | Polyvinyl Records

Closing out a 2017 compilation of previously unreleased demos, Vault, Vol. 3 gathers the final 19 tracks of 64 rescued from the failing hard drive of STRFKR founder and main songwriter Josh Hodges. With some of the demos dating back to before the project's debut, and with tracks in various states of completion, the collection is presented as a glimpse into Hodges' songwriting process. Still, as was the case with Vol. 1 and Vol. 2, there are some notably catchy gems and intriguing song segments here awaiting discovery, as well as a few seemingly complete songs that never received the full dance-rock production treatment. In fact, Vol. 3 is the only installment with no tracks clocking in at under a minute. It opens with the cartoonish "Shot Gun," a nearly five-minute entry with old-school telephone ringers, spoken voice, monosyllabic singing, simple drums, and frolicsome keyboards and electronics that gets things off to a jaunty start. Next up, the briefer "Sensitive" sets a frenetic groove before collapsing into an organized power-down. Elsewhere, there's the carnivalesque, wordless "Lazer Fight" and the bloopy "Bla." (A different track is aptly titled "Bleeper"). Demos like "Aliens" and "Alaska" contain spoken-word samples alongside whimsical, sci-fi-evoking electronics and effective beats. More reflective, singer/songwriter-type fare is represented by "Laura," though it's an outlier among this particular group of tracks. While not exactly essential for fans due to the incomplete nature of the demos, there's some infectious stuff to be culled from this compilation, and Vol. 3 is the most consistently playful. © Marcy Donelson /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released February 7, 2017 | Polyvinyl Records

Vault, Vol. 1 is the first of an expected three collections by synth pop-leaning indie rockers STRFKR. Arriving after their fourth full-length, it consists of previously unreleased recordings salvaged from bandleader Josh Hodges' computer, some pre-dating the band's first album by a couple of years. Considered a peek into Hodges' creative process, most of the 20 tracks are one- or two-minute snippets of songs that will be of interest only to dedicated fans. They consist of guitar and keyboard demos, along with a few that are more fleshed-out, like the 100-second "Boogie Woogie." Some of the clips are pretty darn catchy, though, and the trippy "Only Humans" clocks in at over six minutes. © Marcy Donelson /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released January 21, 2014 | Polyvinyl Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released May 5, 2009 | Badman Recording Co

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Alternative & Indie - Released January 10, 2012 | Badman Recording Co

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Alternative & Indie - Released July 7, 2017 | Polyvinyl Records

On the heels of Vol. 1 released five months earlier, Vault, Vol. 2 collects 25 previously unreleased demos recovered from the dying laptop of STRFKR's main songwriter, Josh Hodges. Varying in length from around 30 seconds to three minutes, they're mostly fragments of songs -- in both vertical and horizontal senses. With some recordings dating back to before the band's debut, and none intended for release, they come advertised as a look into the songwriting process. Given the sketchy nature of the material, what's surprising about much of it is how catchy these kernels are and how well some of the solo keyboard or guitar pieces work as is. While they're lean for STRFKR's typically vibrant electro-rock, some function as perfectly serviceable lo-fi-as-an-aesthetic recordings. With electronics and keys, acoustic guitar, bass and drums, octave vocals, and multiple verses, "Queer Bot," for instance, wouldn't be too out of place on a (Sandy) Alex G album. Elsewhere, although under a minute in length, "Wasting Away" is an intimate acoustic guitar duet that also holds its own among the post-Elliott Smith set. Those more structured (if not fully produced) songs are mixed in with tracks that serve to take note of a groove or other potential building block ("Laa Loo," "Beat 8"), and segments that end more abruptly. Still, while it's a grab bag more than an album, and not for those seeking new STRFKR singles, what's here is engaging and coherent (as opposed to buried in hiss). As much as for dedicated fans who want to hear whatever Hodges puts out there, it may appeal to aficionados of singer/songwriter-type lo-fi. © Marcy Donelson /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released September 6, 2019 | Polyvinyl Records

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Alternative & Indie - Released August 17, 2018 | Polyvinyl Records

After a group effort on the band-penned Miracle Mile, STRFKR took a different approach to their fourth LP. The bulk of the album was written in isolation by bandleader Joshua Hodges during a desert retreat to Joshua Tree. With a goal to "be in the moment," he reported embracing the feeling of being insignificant that comes with that territory. The resulting set of songs lays the foundation of Being No One, Going Nowhere, which also includes a track by drummer Keil Corcoran ("In the End") and input throughout from Corcoran and bass player Shawn Glassford. The more refined sound and reflective tone of their prior album carries over onto Being No One, Going Nowhere, and there's still no shortage of club-friendly grooves. "Satellite" rides syncopated bass, beats reinforced by claps, chilly synths, and warmer guitar through Hodges' delivery, airy and composed as he sings "Fall away from the edge of the world/Where I’m fine on my own." Things get a little glitchier on "Maps," while "Dark Days" turns out to be one of the brighter tracks, at least musically, with melodic bleeps and a driving four-on-the-floor. Opener "Tape Machine" was written for another project with friends in Amsterdam rather than in seclusion. It offers trippy funk-pop with sci-fi laser sound effects that manage to play right into the wistful tone it still produces, in keeping with the album ("I know your darkness better than you think"). Overall darker but still motivated by dance, Being No One, Going Nowhere hits a sophisticated balance of light and heavy, unsettled and hooky, feet and temper, with an electro-post-punk sheen that altogether seems very much of its time. © Marcy Donelson /TiVo
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Alternative & Indie - Released August 17, 2010 | Badman Recording Co