Categories :

Similar artists

Albums

HI-RES$12.99
CD$8.99

Film Soundtracks - Released February 14, 2020 | Lakeshore Records

Hi-Res
HI-RES$13.49
CD$8.99

Ambient - Released May 10, 2019 | Temporary Residence Ltd.

Hi-Res
Steve Moore deserves a lot of credit. Not only did he help usher in the horror soundtrack revival with his band Zombi, but his early solo albums, such as 2007's The Henge, explored Berlin School synth music and new age long before hip labels were reissuing Software and Iasos records. After devoting a large chunk of the 2010s to writing scores for actual horror films (the best of which remains 2016's exemplary The Mind's Eye), Beloved Exile is Moore's first proper solo album since 2013's Spectrum Spools-issued Pangaea Ultima. Immediately, the album feels like one of the most spiritually informed works he's ever produced. Opener "Your Sentries Will Be Met with Force" features the enchanting vocals of Tunisian singer Emel Mathlouthi, who adds a sublime new dimension to Moore's glowing, pulsating electronics. On much of the rest of the album, Moore is joined by master harpist Mary Lattimore. Her graceful playing complements the ebbing and flowing organ minimalism of "In the Shelter of the Dunes," and while it's undoubtedly calmer than much of Moore's repertoire, there's still a bit of underlying tension carrying over from his soundtrack work. Following the shimmering, midtempo ambient techno of the album's title cut, "Throne Lane" is a much lonelier trek, yet Lattimore's harp and the subtle details of Moore's sound design keep the piece sounding airy and fresh, rather than trapped in a dungeon. The 15-minute rolling epic "My Time Among the Snake Lords" has more of a desert plain atmosphere, with Jeff Gretz providing distant cymbal rushes and other percussive details. A ticking pulse and trickily timed bassline emerge, and Lattimore's harp adds harmony to Moore's hypnotic prog rock guitar melody. Beloved Exile contains some of Moore's most meditative music, while also maintaining the fantasy element present throughout his work. © Paul Simpson /TiVo
HI-RES$12.99
CD$8.99

Film Soundtracks - Released January 17, 2020 | Relapse Records

Hi-Res
HI-RES$12.99
CD$8.99

Film Soundtracks - Released December 2, 2016 | Relapse Records

Hi-Res
CD$9.99

Ambient - Released December 16, 2013 | Spectrum Spools

HI-RES$12.99
CD$8.99

Film Soundtracks - Released November 24, 2017 | Relapse Records

Hi-Res
Following his astounding soundtrack to the telekinesis-themed horror film The Mind's Eye, Zombi co-founder Steve Moore scored another thriller, Joe Lynch's Mayhem. As with The Mind's Eye, Moore's Mayhem score is a sprawling affair, containing more than 30 tracks, and they seem to encompass elements of nearly every style of music in which Moore has created. There's pulsating electro-disco, laced with bubbling arpeggios and rising synths, such as opener "Welcome to TSC" and closer "The King Falls," as well as the more bombastic "Showdown." There are bits of moody trip-hop, such as the succinct "Thank God for Coffee." Ambient pieces like "We Are Brave" provide momentary periods of reflection, but longer, more developed tracks like "ID-7" are much more intense, with pounding drum attacks and a much more ferocious edge to the synths. "Mine's Bigger" is one of the more aggressive tracks, particularly due to its bashing drums and growling guitar, but while those sounds seem to signal the coming of a moment of bloody terror, much of the piece's second half seems suspended in the night air. The soundtrack never stays in one place for long, with most of the tracks lasting only a minute or two, and even the lengthier ones (which are still under four minutes) seem to switch directions a few times, suddenly exploding into frenzy or drifting away just as it seems like the intensity is about to ramp up. The album feels a bit more scattered than The Mind's Eye; plenty of the pieces just seem way too short to make a lasting impression on their own. Of course, being a soundtrack, it's all about the big picture, and as a whole, it's a heady, all-encompassing world of suspenseful sounds, demonstrating Moore's mastery of the form. © Paul Simpson /TiVo
HI-RES$1.79
CD$1.19

Ambient - Released April 8, 2019 | Temporary Residence Ltd.

Hi-Res
CD$5.99

Rock - Released October 30, 2007 | Relapse Records

CD$2.49

Rock - Released March 1, 2010 | Mexican Summer

CD$0.99

Electronic/Dance - Released February 27, 2015 | Ghost Box

HI-RES$12.99
CD$8.99

Film Soundtracks - Released November 9, 2017 | Relapse Records

Hi-Res
HI-RES$1.79
CD$1.19

Ambient - Released February 20, 2019 | Temporary Residence Ltd.

Hi-Res
CD$8.99

Techno - Released October 3, 2019 | L.I.E.S.

CD$8.99

House - Released December 3, 2013 | L.I.E.S.

HI-RES$12.99
CD$8.99

Film Soundtracks - Released December 4, 2019 | Relapse Records

Hi-Res
CD$9.99

Electronic/Dance - Released January 1, 2012 | Cuneiform Records

Steve Moore, half of Pittsburgh electronic/prog rock duo Zombi, draws inspiration from classic '70s-era German electronic music on his October 2012 Cuneiform label debut, Light Echoes. This is not unfamiliar territory for Moore; the influence of Tangerine Dream can be heard in his previous solo work and on Zombi albums, and, incidentally, in the solo music of Moore's Zombi partner A.E. Paterra, whose second album under the Majeure moniker, Solar Maximum, also arrived in October 2012. An all-synthesizer outing absent any contributions from Paterra on drums, Light Echoes draws from the experimental streak in '70s electronic music, perhaps to a greater extent than Zombi and/or Majeure, but, like groundbreaking sequencer-driven TD albums such as Phaedra and Ricochet, this is still music with a definite pulse. Yet the listener is advised to relax, be patient, and allow the 70-plus-minute album -- including the 28-minute final track "Ancient Shorelines II" -- to reveal gradually the full extent of its immersive powers. Employing an array of vintage analog synths and ancillary equipment (although Edgar Froese likely didn't have an iMac 3.06 GHz Intel Core 2 Duo back in the day), Moore puts his own 21st century imprint on music that is both rhythmic and free-floating, as repeating blippy synth arpeggios maintain steady momentum while deep slow-moving drones, building chord orchestrations, and cosmic wind effects emerge across the sound field. Some might wish for a bit more variation in the arpeggiated sequencer patterns of the first two tracks, "Tyken's Rift" and "Light Echoes I," although there is also an interesting war of sorts between the rhythmic elements and tidal waves of slow-moving, engulfing sound. The battle ends in a draw on this initial pair of tracks, while the absence of any fast and sharply articulated rhythmic looping on third track "Aldebran Exchange," with its measured movement and layering of sounds from windy to ominous to razor-sharp to ethereal, suggests that Eno-esque dark ambience might have triumphed in the end. But really, less than 20 minutes of Light Echoes have transpired, and "Aldebran Exchange" is merely a bridge to a pair of the album's most animated -- relatively speaking -- pieces, "Light Echoes II" and "Protomorphosis." The former -- despite Moore's professed interest in making Light Echoes an album of "sounds" rather than "songs" -- actually introduces a bit of compositional tension through a drawn-out chord progression (gasp!) in the arpeggiated sequences that moves toward and away from consonance with high- and low-pitched pedal-point synth drones. Meanwhile -- both here and especially in "Protomorphosis" -- Moore's knob twiddling produces a welcome textural complexity in the arpeggios and ostinatos that, when compared to the album's first third, almost sounds like an interstellar West African-inspired polyrhythmic drum circle. This is all merely prelude to the aforementioned "Ancient Shorelines II," however, which traverses insistent percolations, throbbing pulses, pounding martial beats, and dissonance-tinged chordal onslaughts across its epic half-hour length. © Dave Lynch /TiVo
HI-RES$12.99
CD$8.99

Film Soundtracks - Released October 29, 2019 | Relapse Records

Hi-Res
CD$8.99

Techno - Released December 3, 2013 | L.I.E.S.

HI-RES$12.99
CD$8.99

Film Soundtracks - Released October 16, 2015 | Relapse Records

Hi-Res
HI-RES$12.99
CD$8.99

Film Soundtracks - Released October 19, 2017 | Relapse Records

Hi-Res