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Pop - Released March 18, 1996 | RT Industries

The Gold Collection is a 16-track compilation of Sheena Easton's non-hits, taking songs from the majority of her albums that were either never released or failed to gain any commercial fame. Three of her Top 40 hits do manage to surface ("Morning Train," "Modern Girl," and "For Your Eyes Only"), and even though the collection is sparse on familiarity, it does contain a fair amount of attractive material. A handful of songs, including "Summer's Over," "Back in the City," "So We Say Goodbye," "Calm Before the Storm," and "Paradox" present Easton's softer side for the most part, bringing to light what a fine vocalist she is outside of her radio pop. Die-hard Easton fans will want to own The Gold Collection mainly as a convenient assortment of second-bests, but for the curious and the hit lovers, it should be regarded as a later buy. This set may also spark some interest in Easton's back catalog, especially albums such as 1985's Do You and 1987's No Sound but a Heart, where she began to sing softer, more adult-oriented love songs and ballads. © Mike DeGagne /TiVo
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Pop - Released June 7, 1993 | RT Industries

Sheena Easton never achieved red-hot status, but she remained consistent for nearly a decade -- a much more difficult feat -- and this generous collection showcases a long (in terms of pop stardom) career of adult contemporary ballads, R&B-flavored dance tunes, and straight-up pop. What's nice about this collection is that it includes monster hits like the fluff of "Telefone (Long Distance Love Affair)" and "Morning Train (Nine to Five)," as well as smaller hits like the beautifully written but sadly over-synthesized "When He Shines" and the plucky "Modern Girl," while also including cuts like the proud but humbled "I Wouldn't Beg for Water" and the Motown throwback "Jimmy Mack" that didn't get much action on the U.S. charts. Easton wraps her pipes around each song, turning vamp ("Strut") then drama queen ("Almost Over You") then country chanteuse ("We've Got Tonight") without ever missing a beat. Her strong point is good material, though it oftentimes gets overshadowed by less than worthy production. As extensive as this collection is, however, it's unfortunate her singles with Prince and "The Lover in Me" are missing. Otherwise, this is an almost-perfect greatest-hits compilation. © Bryan Buss /TiVo
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Pop - Released April 1, 1995 | RT Industries

Sheena Easton's now outdated Greatest Hits collects the bulk of her pre-MCA hits, among them the adult contemporary classics "Morning Train," "For Your Eyes Only," "Telefone," and "Almost Over You." Also included are her two sex-kitten hits, "Strut" and the Prince-penned "Sugar Walls" (credited to Alexander Nevermind). This collection is by no means all-inclusive, leaving out "You Could Have Been With Me," as well as minor hits such as "Do It for Love," "Jimmy Mack," and "So Far So Good." For an all-inclusive, pre-MCA Sheena Easton hits collection, go with 1993's The World of Sheena Easton, which collects each and every one of her chart entries from "Morning Train" to "So Far So Good" (in chronological order, no less). However, this album does include her pre-Bette Midler version of "Wind Beneath My Wings," which is not on the other collection. This brief set does manage to highlight the artist's versatility, with material ranging from adult contemporary ("When He Shines") to country ("We've Got Tonight" with Kenny Rogers) to '80s R&B/dance ("Strut," "Sugar Walls"). Save for the inclusion of "Wind Beneath My Wings," The World of Sheena Easton proves to be an infinitely superior collection. © Jose F. Promis /TiVo
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Pop - Released July 26, 2013 | RT Industries

Easton and producer Christopher Neil added a bit of an R&B flavor to this generally agreeable sophomore set. The production is at times repetitive, and Neil's backing vocals occasionally border on intrusive. At the core, however, most of the material is easily consumed. It's with ballads (of which there are a good number here) that Easton displays the most range and potential. The uptempo cuts are catchy, but are overproduced and fall victim to lyrical and arrangement clichés. © Justin M. Kantor /TiVo
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Rock - Released December 4, 2009 | RT Industries

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Pop - Released August 8, 2008 | RT Industries

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Pop - Released November 1, 1988 | Geffen

Sheena Easton bounced back from her unattractive 1987 split from EMI with her most decidedly urban set to date. Enlisting the help of R&B production heavyweights L.A. Reid and Babyface -- as well as Angela Winbush, Jellybean and Prince, she came out with a youthful and trend-savvy offering that has some fun moments, but overall is too formulaic to really say much. The snazzy L.A. and Babyface number "The Lover in Me" (number two pop, number five R&B) is one of the album's most solid, memorable moments, but it soon becomes hard to distinguish from "Days Like This," "No Deposit, No Return" and "One Love" -- three other selections produced by the duo. Easton was apparently becoming more of a producer's puppet than she planned early in her career, as further evidenced by the synthetic "Without You," which is too low in the singer's range to be effective to start with. Luckily, a few saving moments do surface: the Winbush-produced "Fire and Rain," a calming quiet storm ballad that allows Easton to showcase a more vulnerable side of her voice; and the Prince-penned "101," a subtly haunting, understated dance romp with what is one of the singer's most passionate, revealing performances on record. Otherwise, this is a fun record, but a bit too monotonous. © Justin M. Kantor /TiVo
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Pop - Released July 26, 2013 | RT Industries

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Pop - Released July 26, 2013 | RT Industries

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Pop - Released November 24, 2014 | RT Industries

This budget-priced, bare-bones box set rounds up the first five studio albums from the Scottish-born hitmaker. Part of WEA's Original Album Series, all of the material is taken from Easton's early-'80s heyday, which means that most of the big hits are here, including "9 to 5/Morning Train," "Modern Girl," "You Could Have Been with Me," "Strut," and "Sugar Walls." The collection includes 1980's Take My Time, 1981's You Could Have Been with Me, 1982's Madness, Money, and Music, 1983's Best Kept Secret, and 1984's A Private Heaven. © James Christopher Monger /TiVo
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Pop - Released January 10, 1983 | RT Industries

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Pop - Released February 1, 1987 | RT Industries

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Pop - Released January 1, 1993 | Geffen*

In 1993, Sheena Easton took a detour from the R&B, Prince-flavored dance music that kept her near the top of the charts through the mid- to late 1980s and early 1990s and recorded a superb standards album. Easton's voice has never sounded so clear, and this stellar set truly allows the singer to shine, as she subtly wraps her pipes around these timeless tunes, effortlessly transforming each into her own. From the opening, oft-covered classic "Someone to Watch Over Me" to the finger-snappin' closer "Never Will I Marry," this timeless, sexy, romantic disc, which features stellar arrangements courtesy of Patrice Rushen, is 100 percent class, with each track superbly produced and performed. Highlights include "The Nearness of You," which was featured in the film Indecent Proposal, and "If You Go Away," which Easton delivers with such understated heartache that one would believe the song were specifically written for her. Everything about this album, from the song selection to the glamour shots, and especially the way Easton's voice takes to the standards, signifies that this genre is perfectly suited for the songstress. One could only wish that she would wisely choose to retread this musical path in the near future, because she shines just as brightly as yesterday's singers who originally made these songs famous so long ago. © Jose F. Promis /TiVo
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Pop - Released July 26, 2013 | RT Industries

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Pop - Released May 3, 2013 | RT Industries

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Pop - Released November 23, 1984 | RT Industries

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Pop - Released February 7, 1983 | RT Industries

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Pop - Released January 1, 1995 | Geffen

It is saying something when a song sounds great except for the particular singer who is belting it out. The belter here is Sheena Easton and the song in case is "My Cherie," which is like a melodic offspring of "Morning Train": smooth and repetitive so that it clings to the listener willingly or not. Easton's vocals are so nasally and hyperactive on the song that it is nearly unbearable, yet so hard to shake off. That said, the rest of the album is pleasant and relaxing, sometimes danceable, though not very memorable. The flip side of the song "My Cherie" is that her voice is the best thing on the remaining tracks. The joyful energy is top-notch on "Next to You" and "Too Much in Love," along with slip-and-slide production quality. There is hardly reason to dislike any of the other tracks, they are friendly and not tragically sentimental, though they pass over non-affectingly. Sheena Easton has proved herself time and again with energetic singles, as well as charming, teary ballads. Her talent extends beyond the flakiness of "My Cherie," and with potential to drive to full force like the Scottish diva she is, why she has placed her stakes at a General Hospital soundtrack level is anyone's guess. © Peter Fawthrop /TiVo