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Classical - Released December 6, 2005 | Nonesuch - Warner Records

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World - Released December 6, 2005 | Nonesuch

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World - Released May 17, 2005 | Rhino - Warner Records

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World - Released December 6, 2005 | Nonesuch

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World - Released July 3, 2001 | Nonesuch

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Classical - Released August 15, 2007 | Nonesuch

Sérgio and Odair Assad's Nonesuch disc Jardim abandonado apparently has been in the pipeline for some time; part of it was recorded in 2002 and the rest in 2006. However, this mixed program of works ranging from Debussy to music written by Sergio Assad's daughter Clarice was certainly worth the wait. This beautifully recorded disc, with a breathtaking photograph by French master Eugène Atget gracing its front cover, is eminently listenable and seamlessly moves through works of Jobim, Milhaud, Debussy, and Sérgio Assad's arrangement of Gershwin's Rhapsody in Blue without missing a beat. Among the most striking aspects of Jardim abandonado is the selection of contemporary pieces included, which are sunk in among the more familiar stuff -- three radiant duets by Clarice Assad, a bracing and rhythmically palpitating long form piece by Sérgio Assad himself, and an instrumental work entitled Octet written by Broadway composer Adam Guettel. There is not one word of notes in Nonesuch's package, so we are inclined to guess as to how the Assad brothers came up with this ingenious program and what the conceptual thrust of it is; Nonesuch doesn't even provide track numbers to go with the track titles. However, this should not be a hindrance to enjoying the great music and terrific playing of the Assads here -- such oversight just seems a little chintzy, as everything else about Jardim abandonado is deluxe in a big way. © TiVo
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World - Released March 7, 2006 | Nonesuch

The Assads' extraordinary performance, extensively awarded internationally, is credited by the fact that by being brothers they received the same education and had such mutual understanding. In fact, it is hard to match the duo's precision in the attacks, dynamics, and expression -- even harder when the subject is Brazilian music with its intricate rhythms. In this 1988 release for the Elektra/Nonesuch label, the Assad brothers interpret wonderfully a sophisticated set of Brazilian composers that goes from classical Villa-Lobos to popular Wagner Tiso, from erudite Marlos Nobre to the Brazilian jazz proponent Hermeto Pascoal, from the classically trained popular composer Egberto Gismonti to the classically trained popular composer Radamés Gnattali, and they even play Sérgio Assad's compositions. This seems to be the subliminal message: constant labeling of things "classical" and "popular" serves no useful purposes. They couldn't be more faithful to the spirit of the masters performed by them: Villa-Lobos, Gnattali, and Gismonti all supported the same ideals throughout their lives. With exciting rhythmic mastery, exploring to the limits the swinging spirit of Brazilian music in a sophisticated setting, they met the highest standards of expression in a broad palette of resources that range from the meditative to the utterly aggressive, though never abandoning the classical proportions of the ideal sound -- unless in the percussive strokes over the violão's (acoustic guitar) soundboard. © TiVo