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Metal - Released November 3, 2017 | Rhino Atlantic

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Metal - Released February 7, 2020 | Nuclear Blast

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By its very fast and loud nature thrash metal can be numbingly repetitive, its archaic anger and endless aggression pointless and overly familiar. And yet the exceptions can be glorious, none more potent or listenable than Sepultura. Having lost none of their trademark power and volume, this quartet's music has grown and aged well over the past 35 years thanks to a keen awareness of not repeating themselves—an extraordinarily difficult feat in the genre—with an inventive devotion to detail. While the song titles like, "Fear Pain Chaos Suffering" and angry lyrics infused with demons and urgency connect to the band's storied past, nearly every tune of this 12 track set has an unexpected musical flourish: the violins on the mighty first single, "Isolation"; a whispered soft section in "Autem"; the Brazilian drums that open "Capital Enslavement”; the opening flamenco-flavored acoustic guitars and vocal choirs of "Guardians of the Earth." This a brotherhood always looking for ways to stretch and grow their music beyond the confining bounds of the genre. The recording ethos here—a razor-edged, towering wall-of-amplification—has some surprisingly varied dynamics. The key to the band's continued intensity on Quadra comes from Derrick Green, whose raw roar has become the band's most identifiable sonic signature since replacing original vocalist Max Cavalera in 1997, and drummer Eloy Casagrande, who despite being the shortest tenured and youngest member, has also become a dynamic force as co-writer with guitarist Andreas Kisser. Given their exertions, thrash metal drummers are Olympic athletes and no one deserves a gold more than Casagrande. Fame, money, respect: Sepultura have it all. And yet happily their ambition and hunger remain. © Robert Baird / Qobuz
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Rock - Released June 15, 2018 | Rhino Atlantic

Sepultura had shocked the death metal world in 1989 with the release of their third album, Beneath the Remains, whose seamless combination of songwriting chops and utter brutality quickly transformed the Brazilians from scene outsiders to one of its brightest hopes. The band toured nonstop in support of the album for most of the following two years, and was therefore pressured by both time constraints and enormous expectations when the bandmembers finally entered Tampa's Morrisound Studios with producer Scott Burns to record 1991's Arise. And though it ultimately lacked the consistency of its predecessor and added little innovation to the band's sound, Arise has aged surprisingly well, proving itself a worthy progression and surprisingly well-rounded in its own right. First single "Dead Embryonic Cells" was unquestionably the strongest of the band's death metal era, and its accompanying video broke new ground thanks to ample MTV rotation. Ironically, the subsequent banning of the vicious title track's video (filled with apocalyptic religious imagery) by the cable network would generate even more publicity than Sepultura could have hoped for had it actually been aired. Other album highlights included such complex, multifaceted pieces as "Desperate Cry" (an all-around tour de force for lead guitarist Andreas Kisser) and "Altered State" (which combines a Tarzan-style intro with a grinding detuned main riff and even acoustic guitars), as well as more straightforward thrashers like "Infected Voice" and mid-paced chuggers like "Under Siege (Regnum Irae)." Simply devoid of filler material, this album remains a classic of the death metal genre. ~ Eduardo Rivadavia
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Rock - Released October 13, 2017 | Rhino Atlantic

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Rock - Released June 15, 2018 | Rhino Atlantic

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Sepultura had shocked the death metal world in 1989 with the release of their third album, Beneath the Remains, whose seamless combination of songwriting chops and utter brutality quickly transformed the Brazilians from scene outsiders to one of its brightest hopes. The band toured nonstop in support of the album for most of the following two years, and was therefore pressured by both time constraints and enormous expectations when the bandmembers finally entered Tampa's Morrisound Studios with producer Scott Burns to record 1991's Arise. And though it ultimately lacked the consistency of its predecessor and added little innovation to the band's sound, Arise has aged surprisingly well, proving itself a worthy progression and surprisingly well-rounded in its own right. First single "Dead Embryonic Cells" was unquestionably the strongest of the band's death metal era, and its accompanying video broke new ground thanks to ample MTV rotation. Ironically, the subsequent banning of the vicious title track's video (filled with apocalyptic religious imagery) by the cable network would generate even more publicity than Sepultura could have hoped for had it actually been aired. Other album highlights included such complex, multifaceted pieces as "Desperate Cry" (an all-around tour de force for lead guitarist Andreas Kisser) and "Altered State" (which combines a Tarzan-style intro with a grinding detuned main riff and even acoustic guitars), as well as more straightforward thrashers like "Infected Voice" and mid-paced chuggers like "Under Siege (Regnum Irae)." Simply devoid of filler material, this album remains a classic of the death metal genre. ~ Eduardo Rivadavia
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Metal - Released January 1, 1996 | Roadrunner Records

Listeners intrigued by the rhythmic innovations and Brazilian influences of Chaos A.D. will be quite pleased by Sepultura's sprawling, frequently brilliant follow-up. True to its title, Roots wholeheartedly embraces Sepultura's native Brazilian rhythms, augmenting their music with field recordings of the Xavantes Indians, vocalist/percussionist Carlinhos Brown, and expanded percussion sections. The guitarists create an array of noisy, textural effects, so their technique and riff writing are not as impressive for fans of old-school thrash, but that's more due to the growing influence of alternative metal on the band, with Korn being a particular touchstone (vocalist Jonathan Davis even guests on one track). The songs sacrifice the tight structure of Chaos A.D. for extended percussion jams, plus some acoustic instrumental work. At 72 minutes, Roots inevitably loses focus in spots, but when the music connects (and it does so often), it carries tremendous visceral impact. Roots consolidates Sepultura's position as perhaps the most distinctive, original heavy metal band of the 1990s. ~ Steve Huey
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Rock - Released November 10, 1997 | Roadrunner Records

Sepultura's 1989 release, Beneath the Remains, marked the band's transition from third-world obscurity to major contenders in the international extreme metal arena. As soon as the deceptively gentle acoustic intro gives way to the title track's thrashing brutality, the listener is propelled at maximum speed and intensity through to the very last crunch of "Primitive Future." In between, Sepultura offer their first bona fide hits with "Inner Self" and the inspired "Stronger Than Hate," featuring lyrics written by Atheist's Kelly Shaefer. It's not over there as they charge ahead with the triple threat of "Mass Hypnosis," "Sarcastic Existence," and "Slaves of Pain," all of which feature mind-blowing solos from guitarist Andreas Kisser, thunderous double-bass work from drummer Igor Cavalera, and the furious howling of singer Max Cavalera. The complete absence of filler here makes this one of the most essential death/thrash metal albums of all time. ~ Eduardo Rivadavia

Metal - Released January 13, 2017 | Nuclear Blast

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Rock - Released February 6, 2007 | Roadrunner Records

To combat the sales backlash that began when Derrick Green took singer/guitarist Max Cavalera's spot in the group, Roadrunner Records released the live document Under a Pale Grey Sky. Recorded in the very short period between the death of his stepson and his exit from the group, Cavalera's performance is nothing short of breathtaking. His venomous roar has rarely sounded this raw and heartfelt, he screams with a fury that comes deep from within, and he delivers a performance that pulls the listener uncomfortably close. Guitarist Andreas Kisser is also in fine form, offering an eerie, melodic counterpoint to Cavalera's pounding riffs. One only needs to look to "Endangered Species" to see why the two guitarists were a masterful pairing, with Kisser pasting blistering and shrill leads over Cavalera's abrasive chug in a tense battle of aggression. The track selection may leave a little to be desired; while they take most of the songs from Chaos A.D. and Roots, they barely cover their catalog before that point. What is here is awesome, but it would have been nice to hear "Inquisition Symphony" or "Under Seige" as performed by the group (arguably) at its peak. Toward the end of the performance, the band is strikingly lucid, launching into its two most distinct and awe-inspiring tracks with the last of its energies. First, the acoustic jam "Kaiowas" is a brilliant display of technical skill that showcases the beauty and joy the band finds in its native Brazilian music. Then comes the true monster, "Ratamahatta," a percussion-based masterpiece that plows over the audience with its tribal throb and cathartic build. A massive cover of Motörhead's "Orgasmatron" puts an end to the proceedings and satisfies the encore desires of the audience, but it is a brief coda to an otherwise brutal show. The band was on top of its game professionally and deeply wounded emotionally, making its music as sharp and poignant as it has ever been. Where most live metal albums tend to come off thin and sloppy, Under a Pale Grey Sky does the opposite. Through crystal-clear production, an airtight performance, and a top-notch selection of songs, the album paints a picture of a larger-than-life band throwing its massive bulk around for two hours of sheer hatred. And really, what else would any self-respecting metal fan want out of a live album? ~ Bradley Torreano
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Rock - Released November 19, 2012 | Roadrunner Records

Brazilian technical metal monsters Sepultura grew slowly from a devotion to the legends of their genre, eventually becoming the most successful metal band in Brazil's history as well as a worldwide influence. Founding member Max Cavalera sang and played guitar in the band until a deeply personal dispute over management led him to unceremoniously leave the band in 1996. While the other members carried on with a replacement vocalist, subsequent Sepultura albums never had quite the flair or force of those groundbreaking earlier works. The Complete Max Cavalera Collection 1987-1996 gathers together all 56 tracks from the first five albums, including the incredibly influential mid-'90s releases Arise and Roots. ~ Fred Thomas
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Metal - Released January 1, 1997 | Roadrunner Records

Chaos A.D. was the record where everything came together for Sepultura, when they graduated from being an excellent, if derivative, band into one of metal's most unique voices. Their strident political dissidence is more focused than ever, referring explicitly to injustices in their native Brazil. The band's thick, chunky guitars, busy percussion, and hoarsely shouted vocals may be rooted in death metal, but it was often hard to call Sepultura a true death metal band, even if they flirted heavily with the style by way of Slayer; Chaos A.D. is rooted just as much in hardcore punk in its lean, stripped-down assault, featuring a cover of New Model Army's "The Hunt" and a collaboration with Jello Biafra on "Biotech Is Godzilla." At a time when '80s thrash giants like Metallica and Megadeth were streamlining their music for greater accessibility, Sepultura's aggression actually increased along with their tightened focus, borrowing from hardcore arguably more effectively than any other true metal band. Additionally, Sepultura began to draw upon the influences of their native Brazil, audible in the acoustic instrumental "Kaiowas" and in the way the band's complex rhythms move and breathe, to offer a much wider range than any of their contemporaries seemed willing to pursue. The band's songwriting became almost airtight, giving up the breakneck speed and long progressive passages borrowed from mid-'80s Metallica, and concentrating instead on creating texture and dissonance. But really, it's the unbelievably powerful rhythmic base provided by Igor Cavalera that gives Chaos A.D. its knockout punch. Endlessly playable (there isn't a wasted or unnecessary note on the album), passionately performed, and a sign that a new metal underground was finally bearing artistic fruit, Chaos A.D. ranks as one of the greatest heavy metal albums of all time. It's a remarkable achievement not only in its concentrated power and originality, but also in the degree to which Sepultura eclipsed their idols in offering a vision of heavy metal's future -- a vision that would only grow more compelling with their next release. ~ Steve Huey
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Rock - Released December 2, 2019 | SPV

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Rock - Released September 11, 2006 | Roadrunner Records

The first true greatest-hits album to cherry-pick highlights from the band's back catalog, The Best of Sepultura was compiled as well as it could have been as part of Roadrunner Records' 2006 series of best-ofs (also including Fear Factory, Type O Negative, and others). The underlying issue is that Sepultura's four major albums -- Beneath the Remains (1989), Arise (1991), Chaos A.D. (1993), and Roots (1997) -- are so stellar, they deserve to be heard in full, not piecemeal like this. However, for those consumers not inclined to go out and buy four individual CDs (each of which does have its own unique characteristics, it should be noted), a single-disc sampler like The Best of Sepultura certainly fits the bill. It includes two songs from Beneath the Remains ("Beneath the Remains," "Inner Self"), three from Arise ("Arise," "Dead Embryonic Cells," "Desperate Cry"), four from Chaos A.D. ("Refuse/Resist," "Territory," "Slave New World," "Biotech Is Godzilla"), and three from Roots ("Roots Bloody Roots," "Attitude," "Ratamahatta") -- indeed, the highlights from each. Plus, there's one choice song from the early (and seldom-heard) album Schizophrenia (1987), "Troops of Doom," and thankfully, no songs whatsoever from the post-Max Cavalera lineup of the band. All the songs are sequenced chronologically, as they should be, and there's not a bum one to be heard throughout. If you're already a Sepultura fan, you likely won't have any need for The Best of Sepultura. You'll want (or already have) each of the four major albums in their entirety, or at least some of them. But if you're new to the band, or not sure if you're all that fond of these guys, The Best of Sepultura is a good place to begin exploring. Just don't be surprised if you end up buying each of the albums afterward, once you get a sample of them. In fact, there's a valid case to be made that you should just go out and buy Chaos A.D. instead of this compilation, since it's the most representative, or maybe Arise, which was the mainstream breakthrough, or Beneath the Remains, which is a thrash classic and underground favorite, or perhaps even Roots, which is also excellent, if more experimental and Brazilian in nature. ~ Jason Birchmeier
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Rock - Released October 13, 2017 | Rhino Atlantic

Chaos A.D. was the record where everything came together for Sepultura, when they graduated from being an excellent, if derivative, band into one of metal's most unique voices. Their strident political dissidence is more focused than ever, referring explicitly to injustices in their native Brazil. The band's thick, chunky guitars, busy percussion, and hoarsely shouted vocals may be rooted in death metal, but it was often hard to call Sepultura a true death metal band, even if they flirted heavily with the style by way of Slayer; Chaos A.D. is rooted just as much in hardcore punk in its lean, stripped-down assault, featuring a cover of New Model Army's "The Hunt" and a collaboration with Jello Biafra on "Biotech Is Godzilla." At a time when '80s thrash giants like Metallica and Megadeth were streamlining their music for greater accessibility, Sepultura's aggression actually increased along with their tightened focus, borrowing from hardcore arguably more effectively than any other true metal band. Additionally, Sepultura began to draw upon the influences of their native Brazil, audible in the acoustic instrumental "Kaiowas" and in the way the band's complex rhythms move and breathe, to offer a much wider range than any of their contemporaries seemed willing to pursue. The band's songwriting became almost airtight, giving up the breakneck speed and long progressive passages borrowed from mid-'80s Metallica, and concentrating instead on creating texture and dissonance. But really, it's the unbelievably powerful rhythmic base provided by Igor Cavalera that gives Chaos A.D. its knockout punch. Endlessly playable (there isn't a wasted or unnecessary note on the album), passionately performed, and a sign that a new metal underground was finally bearing artistic fruit, Chaos A.D. ranks as one of the greatest heavy metal albums of all time. It's a remarkable achievement not only in its concentrated power and originality, but also in the degree to which Sepultura eclipsed their idols in offering a vision of heavy metal's future -- a vision that would only grow more compelling with their next release. ~ Steve Huey
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Rock - Released November 3, 2017 | Rhino Atlantic

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Rock - Released November 10, 1997 | Roadrunner Records

Sepultura had shocked the death metal world in 1989 with the release of their third album, Beneath the Remains, whose seamless combination of songwriting chops and utter brutality quickly transformed the Brazilians from scene outsiders to one of its brightest hopes. The band toured nonstop in support of the album for most of the following two years, and was therefore pressured by both time constraints and enormous expectations when the bandmembers finally entered Tampa's Morrisound Studios with producer Scott Burns to record 1991's Arise. And though it ultimately lacked the consistency of its predecessor and added little innovation to the band's sound, Arise has aged surprisingly well, proving itself a worthy progression and surprisingly well-rounded in its own right. First single "Dead Embryonic Cells" was unquestionably the strongest of the band's death metal era, and its accompanying video broke new ground thanks to ample MTV rotation. Ironically, the subsequent banning of the vicious title track's video (filled with apocalyptic religious imagery) by the cable network would generate even more publicity than Sepultura could have hoped for had it actually been aired. Other album highlights included such complex, multifaceted pieces as "Desperate Cry" (an all-around tour de force for lead guitarist Andreas Kisser) and "Altered State" (which combines a Tarzan-style intro with a grinding detuned main riff and even acoustic guitars), as well as more straightforward thrashers like "Infected Voice" and mid-paced chuggers like "Under Siege (Regnum Irae)." Simply devoid of filler material, this album remains a classic of the death metal genre. ~ Eduardo Rivadavia
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Rock - Released January 26, 1997 | Roadrunner Records

Brazilian death metal upstarts Sepultura took an incredible creative leap forward with their second full-length album, 1987's Schizophrenia. Although it was recorded not too long after their primitive, black metal-dominated debut efforts -- 1985's Bestial Devastation EP and 1986's Morbid Visions LP -- Schizophrenia introduced an entirely new sound fusing thrash and death metal, and all of it supported by much improved songwriting, musicianship, and the first truly professional-sounding production job of the band's short career. Constant touring, rehearsal, and the addition of lead guitarist Andreas Kisser (his classical guitar training and memorable solos made an immediate impact) were all key to this stunning transformation, but the heightened level of proficiency at hand is such that it almost seems miraculous at times. With their precise, lightning-quick staccato riffing and multiple, distinct, but interlocking sections, the album's opening triplet of "From the Past Comes the Storm" (preceded by a Psycho-inspired intro theme), "To the Wall," and "Escape from the Void" proved simply devastating to the ears. And yet the seven-minute instrumental "Inquisition Symphony" (later covered by Finnish cello virtuosos Apocalyptica) was arguably even more breathtaking in its diversity, brilliantly showcasing the band's incredible, new-found combination of melody and aggression while adding some tasteful synth touches, to boot. Additional head-banging standouts like "Screams Behind the Shadows" and a re-recorded version of early fan favorite "Troops of Doom" bookend a few less distinctive offerings on side two -- those being token thrashers "Septic Schizo" and "R.I.P. (Rest in Pain)," plus the acoustic interlude "The Abyss," but only a trifling of momentum is lost, nevertheless. All of which helped make Schizophrenia the first Sepultura release to make serious waves with international critics and fans, while setting the stage for the group's imminent breakthrough release, Beneath the Remains. ~ Eduardo Rivadavia
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Metal - Released January 23, 2009 | Sepultura US Inc

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Rock - Released October 5, 1998 | Roadrunner Records

It was generally assumed among most that without guitarist/vocalist Max Cavalera, Sepultura would choose not to carry on, but the remaining members added vocalist Derrick Green (who often sounds much like Cavalera) and recorded Against. The results are much better than one might expect from a band that's lost its leader, as Andreas Kisser, Paulo Jr., and Igor Cavalera prove they're no slouches themselves. But the problem with Against is that it seems to lack a clear vision or direction; the band seems unsure of whether to return to the controlled, hard-hitting brevity of Chaos A.D. or the epic, experimental sprawl of Roots. And while the group's trademark ethnic fusions are present -- most notably the Japanese-flavored instrumental "Kamaitachi" (featuring the percussion troupe Kodo and some lovely flute) and the violin-centered "T3rcermillennium," two of the album's most intriguing tracks -- some of the songs don't really experiment much at all. As a result, the fusions sometimes sound forced, and some songs are too standard a brand of hardcore-tinged thrash'n'bash to match the highest points of the Sepultura catalog, even with Jason Newsted co-writing and playing on the track "Hatred Aside." So all in all, Against finds the band regrouping and struggling to recalibrate itself, which is to be expected given the circumstances; even if it's somewhat disappointing compared to the group's best work, it's much better than one might hope, and there are enough flashes of the old Sepultura brilliance to suggest that great things are still to come. ~ Steve Huey
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Rock - Released January 13, 2017 | Nuclear Blast

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