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Classical - Released July 3, 2012 | Naxos

Booklet Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography - The Qobuz Standard
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Classical - Released June 5, 2020 | Seattle Symphony Media

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Gramophone Record of the Month
What an album from Thomas Dausgaard! The Danish conductor is at ease in the Nordic repertoire and took on Sibelius’ Kullervo (Hyperion) following Paavo Berglund’s world-premiere performance in Bournemouth in 1970. He now continues as Music Director for the Seattle Symphony Orchestra with the second instalment of their recordings of all of Nielsen’s Symphonies, featuring Symphonies 1 & 2.His conducting is remarkably lively and fluid here and is mindful of the rhythm as well as the peculiarities of the instrumentation, which is filled with combinations of unusual timbres. Indeed, Symphony No. 2 (1901-1902, the same time as Sibelius’ Symphony No. 2) also hints at what was to come in Nielsen’s later work, especially through its woodwind arrangements.In this delicate score, Thomas Dausgaard characterises the four temperaments depicted in the movement with astonishing finesse; opening with the Collerico  (Choleric), an energetic allegro, followed by the delightful Comodo e Flemmatico (Phlegmatic), almost nonchalant temperament. The third is an energetic andante that evokes Bruckner’s choral works with dark brass creating the Malincolico (Melancholic) mood. Finally comes a more hesitant tone in the Sanguineo (Sanguine), a skilful mix between the initial collerico and the middle malincolico, with dynamic strings and brassy outbursts.Symphony No. 1 (Op. 7, FS 16, 1892, the same year that Kullervo was premiered) is transformed under the baton of Thomas Dausgaard into an exciting orchestral study that transcends the young Nielsen’s many influences in a veritable burst of creativity. From the very first opus, Thomas Dausgaard offers the listener a glimpse down the radically different path that Nielsen would go down compared with his Finnish counterpart Sibelius, (whom he deeply admired, as evidenced by the letters they exchanged!) and their very different relationship with tradition. An interpretation with much more acuity than many others. A must-listen. © Pierre-Yves Lascar/Qobuz
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Classical - Released December 12, 2006 | Naxos

Booklet Distinctions 4 étoiles du Monde de la Musique
Like the symphonies of fellow American composers Roy Harris and Aaron Copland, William Schuman's most celebrated is his Third Symphony (1941), and it is the most frequently programmed and recorded of the cycle of 10. Perhaps best known from two impressive recordings by Leonard Bernstein and the New York Philharmonic (1960 for Columbia and 1985 for Deutsche Grammophon), this work has indeed become a classic, though it is cited more often in textbooks than heard in concert. Yet because of its transparent structures -- updated Baroque forms, such as the passacaglia, fugue, chorale, and toccata -- and because of its resilient and highly memorable themes, this cogent work is likely to engage serious listeners for many years to come, and continue to be performed by conductors who still value the American populist symphonies of the mid-twentieth century. Gerard Schwarz is conscientious in recording such works with the Seattle Symphony for Naxos, and this 2005 account of the Symphony No. 3 is of a high caliber; in lieu of having either of Bernstein's landmark recordings, Schwarz's is certainly a solid second choice, even if it is not quite as commanding or exciting. However, the Symphony No. 5 for strings (1943), and the choreographic poem Judith (1949) are infrequently played and much less familiar than the Symphony No. 3, and Schwarz's recordings are somewhat stuffy sounding reissues from a 1992 Delos release. Though these works are valuable examples of Schuman's development and have some compelling passages, they may strike some listeners as respectable but longwinded pieces, and non-essential filler at that. Naxos provides extraordinary reproduction on the Symphony No. 3, though the recordings of the remaining works appear not to be remastered. © TiVo
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Classical - Released April 24, 2003 | Naxos

Booklet Distinctions The Qobuz Standard
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Classical - Released October 16, 2020 | Seattle Symphony Media

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Thomas Dausgaard and the Seattle Symphony release thought-provoking live performances of two extraordinary orchestral works composed near the turn of the 20th century: Richard Strauss’ Also sprach Zarathustra and Alexander Scriabin’s The Poem of Ecstasy. Recorded in the stunning acoustics of Benaroya Hall, these bold, colorful scores celebrate the search for creative meaning and the triumph of the human spirit. © SSMedia
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Classical - Released September 13, 2019 | Seattle Symphony Media

Hi-Res Booklet
Among the copious discography of Eine Alpensinfonie, one orchestra stands out in particular: the Dresden Staatskapelle, the outfit that first performed the work in 1915 in Berlin. In the studio, Karl Böhm (1957), Rudolf Kempe (1973), Giuseppe Sinopoli (1993), Fabio Luisi (2007), who have all recorded the work with the Dresden Staatskapelle, were the fortunate guardians of the most authentic tradition of the piece, despite the existence of various other versions. Far removed from this hundred-year-old tradition whose orchestral beauty of Strauss, the Seattle Symphony Orchestra took on this challenging 20th Century work in 2017 conducted by their then-musical director, Thomas Dausgaard, whose vision of the piece was fluid and swift. Here, it doesn't soften or slow as it passes through Strauss's grandiose landscapes, but rather we see links with a more modern orchestral school, such as Berg, for example. Thus the Alpensinfonie becomes an abstract symphonic poem. The album's other point of interest, naturally, lies in its connection with a little-known work by Rued Langgaard (1893–1952), the Prelude of Antikrist, the only opera by this totally forgotten but very important Danish composer from the period 1921-1923. The theme of the Antichrist had a particularly important role in the long development of the Alpensinfonie. Since 1899, Strauss had been sketching out a great work for orchestra ("Künstlertragödie") as an homage to the painter Karl Stauffer-Bern (who died at 33), directly inspired by Nietzsche, which was left unfinished until the day Mahler's death (another "artist's tragedy") pushed the writer to throw himself back in, finishing it four years later: it remains his most essential contribution to musical modernity in the realm of pure symphonic music. As for  Rued Langgaard's Prelude you will be stunned that such surprising music as this, a million miles from Strauss, should be so little known: you will probably also want to explore it further, with Music of the Spheres, the masterpiece! © Pierre-Yves Lascar/Qobuz
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Classical - Released May 12, 2017 | Unclassified

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Classical - Released July 3, 2012 | Naxos

Booklet
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Classical - Released March 6, 2012 | Naxos

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Classical - Released December 6, 2011 | Naxos

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Classical - Released September 25, 2020 | Cantaloupe Music

Booklet
When asked about three of his signature orchestral works — the Grammy-winning Become Ocean, its sequel Become Desert, and the original source Become River (previously unreleased as an official recording until now) — composer John Luther Adams refers to them collectively as “a trilogy that I never set out to write”. Become River, composed for chamber orchestra, was the first of the three, although it began while Adams was working on Become Ocean for the Seattle Symphony. “Steven Schick and I were having dinner together,” Adams recalls, “and I went on at length about the music I’d begun to imagine. ‘So you’re already composing a symphonic ocean,’ Steve said. ‘Maybe for a smaller orchestra you could go ahead and compose that river in delta.’ He had me, and I knew it. Within a week I’d begun work on Become River”. Collected here for the first time, with newly remastered versions of Become Ocean and Become Desert by acclaimed engineer Nathaniel Reichman, The Become Trilogy pays tribute to a magical partnership between Adams, conductor Ludovic Morlot and the renowned Seattle Symphony. As a whole, the music speaks both to the meditative solace of solitude, and the universally shared experience of living, giving and interacting as a citizen of the world. © Cantaloupe Music
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Classical - Released May 1, 2005 | Naxos

Booklet
These recordings deserve to exist. William Schuman's 10 symphonies are surely worthy contributions to the canon of American symphonies. Gerard Schwarz conducting the American symphonic canon is certainly as commendable as all but Bernstein's or Tilson Thomas' conducting. The Seattle Symphony Orchestra's playing of the canon of American symphonies is indubitably as admirable as any but the New York or Boston's playing. Whether these recordings deserve to be played all that often is another question. The Seattle's playing is more than capable but less than polished: the strings sometimes sound scrawny and the brass have a tendency to blast when the dynamics go above forte. Schwarz's conducting is more than competent but less than compelling: his textures sometimes become clotted and his structures have a tendency to sag. And then there's Schuman's symphonies: no matter how lovely its melodies, the Fourth cannot resist meandering off into needless complications and no matter how exalted its counterpoint, the Ninth cannot resist descending to pointless platitudes. The shorter Orchestra Song and Circus Overture are less ambitious and more charming, but are decidedly lightweight and thoroughly forgettable. Naxos' sound is hard and distant. © TiVo
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Classical - Released July 26, 2019 | Seattle Symphony Media

Hi-Res Booklet
After the death of Henri Dutilleux (2013) and Pierre Boulez (2016), it was up to a new generation of composers to take the reins of contemporary music in France. While some of them have been widely known for a few years, they are now establishing themselves not only in their own country but also internationally, such as Marc-André Dalbavie, to whom Ludovic Morlot and his Seattle Symphony Orchestra have devoted an entire album.With half recorded in concert (La Source d’un regard, flute Concerto) and half recorded in the studio (Concerto for oboe, cello Concerto), this anthology provides the perfect insight into the poetic and colourful style of this composer, born in 1961. An orchestral work composed as part of Olivier Messiaen’s centenary in 2008, La Source d’un regard repeatedly uses a group of four notes from Vingt Regards de Messiaen in a very unique way and with great finesse, alternating between contemplative sound layers and more rhythmical passages.Written in 2009 for the Russian oboist Alexis Ogrintchouk, the lead oboist of the Amsterdam Concertgebouw Orchestra, the Oboe Concerto is a combination of both virtuosity and poetry. All the ambitus and potential of the soloist instrument are exploited here, including the use of multi-phonic sounds for expression. Dalbavie composed his Flute Concerto in 2006 for another great international virtuoso, the Swiss flutist Emmanuel Pahud, lead flutist for the Berliner Philharmoniker.Composed in 2013, the Cello Concerto, is written in six episodes in the form of “Fantasies”, at times dreamy and hallucinatory. The soloists, Mary Lynch on oboe, Demarre McGill on flute and Jay Campbell on cello immerse themselves completely in these three concertante pieces conducted by Ludovic Morlot, whose eight years as conductor of the Seattle Orchestra draw to a close in this very French finale. © François Hudry/Qobuz
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Classical - Released September 6, 2011 | Naxos

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Classical - Released October 4, 2011 | Naxos

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Classical - Released November 11, 2016 | Seattle Symphony Media

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Classical - Released June 24, 2016 | Naxos Special Projects

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Classical - Released September 9, 2016 | Unclassified

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Classical - Released September 30, 2014 | Cantaloupe Music

Hi-Res Booklet
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Classical - Released November 12, 2003 | Naxos

Booklet