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Pop - Released October 22, 2013 | Epic

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Pop/Rock - Released July 3, 2007 | Epic

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For her first major outing, Little Voice, Sara Bareilles puts forth an intimate, emotionally charged album that sounds remarkably polished for a fledgling self-taught songwriter/performer. In fact, her voice even stands up to professionally trained pop divas like Christina Aguilera. Her only potential downfall is that she fits so perfectly in the adult contemporary female pianist mold that comparisons are inevitable -- Bareilles' vocal range is similar to Fiona Apple and she bears a striking physical resemblance to a merged composite of Vanessa Carlton and Michelle Branch. Despite the plethora of comparable looking and sounding artists, she still manages to stand out. The songs are sultry and generally upbeat, and delivered in a soulful manner with polished production and arrangement, but her X factor is in her ability to make it all sound unforced and very, very easy. Unquestionably, she's a natural with a huge voice and personality that shine through with spirited energy here. Perhaps the best and most original track is the ultra-peppy (think "Benny and the Jets") "Love on the Rocks" (not to be confused with the Neil Diamond number). With a warm wah-wah guitar and meandering Motown-esque harmonies, it makes for a perfect summertime love song. Undoubtedly her expertise is writing love songs like this, evident by song titles like "Love Song" and "One Sweet Love," but there are enough uniquely spun takes on the subject to make it interesting. In "Fairytale," children's stories are used as a metaphor for escapism and dealing with depression, and with the moody ballad "Gravity," falling in love is compared to getting caught in an inescapable gravitational pull. In the latter tearjerker of a tune, she shows off her chops with a song-stopping vocal crescendo, further proving that she has a style that's something special, even among all the stiff competition. © Jason Lymangrover /TiVo

Pop - Released May 10, 2019 | Epic

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Pop - Released September 4, 2020 | Epic

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Pop/Rock - Released July 16, 2013 | Epic

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Pop - Released September 7, 2010 | Epic

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Pop - Released November 6, 2015 | Epic

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Pop/Rock - Released October 28, 2008 | Epic

Like almost every other live release of the new millennium, Between the Line: Sara Bareilles Live at Fillmore is a multi-format package appearing as a CD/DVD set and a Blu_Ray release, all containing the same set. It's a crisp, clean production designed for home theater systems, but it also works very well as a standalone live album, since its lean, lively arrangements -- often featuring extended piano-and-voice segments, with "Fairytale" being performed entirely solo by Bareilles -- wind up showcasing the melodic craft behind her songs. She's still supported by a band that's every bit as professional and slick as the production on her 2007 major-label debut Little Voice, but the live setting is by its nature loose and vigorous, giving her music some punch it lacks in the studio. This energy is the main distinction between Between the Lines and Little Voice, and it's more than enough reason for the dedicated to spend some time with this live set, although the added muscle also bodes well for her next album. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Pop - Released April 5, 2019 | Epic

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For one who had always demonstrated her admiration for the Obamas, the election of Donald Trump in 2016 would have no doubt been a terrible shock. The “Chaos” that she talks of in the title of this album is therefore that of a world in the late 2010s, a chaos created, amongst other things, by Trump. But rather than shame the orange fake tan enthusiast, Sara Bareilles choses a language that is soft and romantic. The album is thus made up of genuine love songs addressed to Barack and Michelle. In the soul ballad No Such Thing, she asks herself – a little like Gilbert Bécaud in his time – what she can do now (Love, What Now?). And in If I Can’t Have You, she gets to grips with lucidity, depth and disarray and the notion of being at a loss (if I can’t have you/Then I’ll have to find a way to get through/Though I don’t want to).However, the album is not only dismay and chagrin faced with a traumatic political situation. The songs also contain aspects of action and hope, most notably regarding the position of women in society – even though this thought often takes the form of a series of homages to specific female figures: Miss Simone alludes enthusiastically to Nina Simone, while Armor is a declaration of love to Tori Amos, one of Sara Bareilles role models. Her compassion towards the tragic situation of migrants is shown in A Safe Place to Land. Musically, the folk pop arrangements reflect the softness of Sara Bareilles’ lyrics and voice. The record includes her inseparable piano, as well as sharp guitars and many delicate rhythmic sections. © Nicolas Magenham/Qobuz
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Pop - Released May 22, 2012 | Epic

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Pop/Rock - Released May 22, 2012 | Epic

Part of Sara Bareilles' charm is that she's one of the few millennial singer/songwriters who are unashamed of being polished and mainstream. She revels in rich, detailed productions, which is what makes Once Upon Another Time -- a stopgap EP designed to tide over fans as she prepares her third album -- a little disarming at first. Working with Ben Folds, a co-judge of hers from the NBC series The Sing-Off, Bareilles strips her sound to its core, opening the five-song EP with its skeletal title track. Things get a little bit more elaborate from there -- "Lie to Me" is built upon trip-hop loops and swoons into Beatlesque psychedelia -- and she certainly demonstrates the influence of the perennially smirking Folds on the profanity-riddled "Sweet as Whole," a dirty joke that bogs down way too quickly. Something similar could be said about the simplicity of the production: as sweet as some of these spare voice-and-piano tunes are, it's hard not to wish they were a little more adorned. Nevertheless, the songs are generally good -- "Sweet as Whole" irritates like a piece of popcorn stuck in the teeth but the others are strongly constructed, melodic ballads, highlighted by the single "Stay" and "Lie to Me" -- and Bareilles remains a thoroughly engaging performer. As a teaser, this certainly whets the appetite for her next full-length record. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Pop - Released October 31, 2018 | Atlantic Records

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Pop - Released June 12, 2020 | Loud Robot - Epic Records

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Film Soundtracks - Released August 16, 2019 | DMI Soundtracks

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Of all the pop singer/songwriters who surfaced in the 21st century, Sara Bareilles may be uniquely qualified to write the songs for a Broadway musical. Indebted to tradition without being beholden to it, Bareilles always favors songs so exquisitely sculpted that their craft is never noticed, only felt, so she's a natural fit for Diane Paulus' adaptation of Adrienne Shelly's 2007 indie comedy-drama Waitress. What's Inside: Songs from Waitress isn't a cast album, it's Bareilles' recording of 12 songs from the production, and the highest compliment that can be paid is that it simultaneously plays as drama and as a sequel to her Grammy-nominated 2013 album The Blessed Unrest. Bright and open, What's Inside does feel of a piece with her 2010 album Kaleidoscope Heart -- the presence of that album's producer Neal Avron, who sat out The Blessed Unrest, is apparent -- and that warm, colorful sheen is enough to make the album play as pop: simply judged on its surface, it provides tangible pleasures. The nifty trick Bareilles pulls off on What's Inside is how the songs also contain a double-edge, serving the drama of the story while also playing as pure pop. Sure, there are flourishes that are pure musical theater -- there's the opening fanfare of "What's Inside." "Never Ever Getting Rid of Me" is Gilbert & Sullivan by way of Todd Rundgren and the show-stopping ballad "She Used to Be Mine" almost seems to conjure a lonely spotlight -- but never once do the songs on What's Inside feel in mere service to a plot. Taken on their own, they're lively, clever, and bold, and further evidence of Bareilles' versatility, elegance, and wit. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Pop - Released May 16, 2008 | Epic

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Film Soundtracks - Released March 30, 2018 | Masterworks

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Pop - Released January 24, 2020 | Epic

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Pop - Released September 15, 2017 | Epic

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Pop - Released May 8, 2019 | Epic

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Pop - Released September 7, 2010 | Epic