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Jazz - Released January 1, 2007 | LRC Ltd. - Groove Merchant Records

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Jazz - Released January 1, 2006 | Prestige

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Organist Richard "Groove" Holmes hit upon a successful formula on this Prestige session (reissued on CD in the OJC series), mixing together boogaloo rhythms with emotional solos. His double-time version of "Misty" became a big hit, and the other selections, including Horace Silver's "Song for My Father" and a pair of soulful originals, are in a similar vein. The lone ballad of the set ("The Things We Did Last Summer") is a fine change of pace. With the assistance of guitarist Gene Edwards and drummer Jimmie Smith, Groove Holmes shows that it is possible to create music that is both worthwhile and commercially successful. © Scott Yanow /TiVo
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Jazz - Released June 12, 2020 | nagel heyer records

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Jazz - Released January 1, 2002 | Blue Note Records

"...Groovy....the presence of Weldon Irvine on electric piano inspires a little post-BITCHES BREW space walking..." © TiVo
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1969 | CM BLUE NOTE (A92)

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Jazz - Released January 1, 2007 | LRC Ltd. - Groove Merchant Records

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Jazz - Released November 4, 2016 | Prestige

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Jazz - Released September 9, 2012 | Universe Remasterings

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Jazz - Released January 29, 2016 | Ace Records

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Jazz - Released January 1, 1980 | Savoy

By 1980, when Broadway was recorded, organist Richard "Groove" Holmes had already splashed onto the scene as an expansive adherent of Jimmy Smith's soul-jazz gospel, been a player in the music's modern boogaloo-acid jazz phase of the late '60s, and survived disco by dropping synthesizers into the mix. Finally arriving at the Muse label by the late '70s, Holmes settled into a loose amalgam of past proclivities, never forsaking his high musical standards and groove aesthetic. For this, his third Muse release, Holmes enlists fellow organ combo veteran Houston Person to produce and ostensibly co-lead on tenor saxophone; for his part, Holmes sublimely comps behind the soloists, electrifying the session with his fluidly nasty runs and sanctified musings on the B3. He presents a typically varied program of pop ("Moon River"), old standards ("Broadway"), and self-penned ballads and blues ("Katherine" and "Plenty, Plenty Blues"); the program's brevity is mirrored not only in the band's equal panache with both up-tempo and slow groove numbers, but also in the attractively cheesy line they ply with the occasional wind chime flourish, synth line, and disco guitar riffing. Holmes even notches up a little avant-garde cachet with an homage to progressive, Coltrane-inspired organist Larry Young. Throughout this cooking and stylish set, Holmes and Person are expertly supported by guitarist Gerald Smith, drummer Bobby Ward, and percussionist Ralph Dorsey. A great buy for soul-friendly jazz fans. © Stephen Cook /TiVo
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Jazz - Released January 1, 2006 | Prestige

Organist Richard "Groove" Holmes hit upon a successful formula on this Prestige session (reissued on CD in the OJC series), mixing together boogaloo rhythms with emotional solos. His double-time version of "Misty" became a big hit, and the other selections, including Horace Silver's "Song for My Father" and a pair of soulful originals, are in a similar vein. The lone ballad of the set ("The Things We Did Last Summer") is a fine change of pace. With the assistance of guitarist Gene Edwards and drummer Jimmie Smith, Groove Holmes shows that it is possible to create music that is both worthwhile and commercially successful. © Scott Yanow /TiVo
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Soul - Released April 1, 2011 | Brownbeats Records

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Funk - Released January 1, 2005 | LRC Ltd. - Groove Merchant Records

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Jazz - Released April 8, 2003 | Savoy

This edition of Savoy's Timeless series delves into cuts taken from Richard "Groove" Holmes' albums Blues All Day Long and Broadway, originally recorded for the Muse label. These nine tracks have been remastered using 24-bit digital transfers from the original acetates and tape masters. Hearing these tracks freshened up is a pleasure and should satisfy even the picky audiophile. © Al Campbell /TiVo
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Pop - Released January 1, 2003 | Prestige

Some wags might claim there's already enough organ-based '60s soul-jazz in the Prestige catalog without throwing a previously unreleased album of the stuff on the bonfire. And your first inclination might be to dismiss this trio date, on which Richard "Groove" Holmes is joined by guitarist Gene Edwards and drummer George Randall, as more of the same old. However, though it does boast much of the expected characteristics of the Prestige sound, this live material, recorded at Count Basie's Lounge in Harlem on April 22, 1966, is above average and worth hearing. The sound quality's very good and fresh, but more importantly, the stripped-down trio arrangements boil the soul-jazz genre down to its most powerful essence. Most soul-jazz acts felt obligated to break up their up-tempo numbers with sleepy renditions of standards, but everything selected for release here's mid-tempo or faster, which, frankly, makes the nearly-hour-long program peppier than you'd expect. And at times, the speed of the rhythms verges on the manic, as on Edwards' solo on "(Back Home Again In) Indiana." On the Coleman Hawkins cover, "Rifftide" the pace gets yet more furious, like the vehemence of fellows who've had way too much coffee during their set break, leaving even the seasoned listener gasping for air like a seasick passenger holding onto the rails for dear life. Their version of Horace Silver's "Nica's Dream" is an only slightly less intense soul-jazz reading of a hard bop number. They can play a more solid, shuffling blues groove well too, though, as they do on covers of "Night Train," and Bobby Timmons' "Moanin'." © Richie Unterberger /TiVo
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Jazz - Released April 1, 1962 | CM BLUE NOTE (A92)

Somethin' Special is a laidback, funky classic which features Richard "Groove" Holmes trading licks with pianist Les McCann, saxophonist Clifford Scott and guitarist Joe Pass, who makes one of his first recorded appearances on this album. It's a fine, infectious album, highlighed by Holmes and McCann's stylish solo. Blue Note's 1997 CD reissue features two bonus cuts, including one that features saxophonist Ben Webster. © Leo Stanley /TiVo
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Jazz - Released February 28, 1991 | Savoy

When 32 Jazz acquired the Muse catalogue in the late 1990s, the New York label had a goldmine of hard bop, post-bop and soul-jazz to reissue. Organ combos were one of Muse's strong points, and the company generally did right by Richard "Groove" Holmes, who signed with Muse in the 1970s and stayed there up until his death from a massive heart attack at the age of 60 on June 29, 1991. Released in 1997, this compilation spans 1977-1988 and points to the fact that the organist's Muse output wasn't much different from his Prestige dates of the 1960s. At Muse, Holmes excelled not by breaking new ground, but by sticking with what he did best: aggressive hard bop, groovin' blues and romantic ballads. Ranging from the fast, intense swinging of "Broadway" and "Good Vibrations" to the romantic ballad playing of "My One and Only Love" to the funky blues of "Blues All Day Long," Groove's Groove paints an impressive picture of Holmes' late period. The title tune shouldn't be confused with the "Groove's Groove" that opens his 1965 Prestige date Soul Message, although both are 12-bar blues numbers. Muse often united Holmes with Houston Person, and the tenor titan is in good-to-excellent form on most of the CD's ten selections. For those exploring Holmes' Muse output for the first time, Groove's Groove wouldn't be a bad starting point. © Alex Henderson /TiVo
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Jazz - Released March 15, 2012 | Vintage Masters Inc.

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Jazz - Released January 31, 2020 | Prestige

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Jazz - Released January 1, 2007 | LRC Ltd. - Groove Merchant Records