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Cinema Music - Released June 7, 2019 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or
What a pleasure it is to return to Riccardo Chailly, at the head of the Filarmonica della Scala, with a collection on Rota (1911-1979) and more particularly his songs written for the great films of Fellini such as Amarcord, Huit et Demi, and La Dolce Vita! Before him, another Riccardo, Muti, had dedicated, in the 1990s, two albums with Sony Classical to the film scores of the Italian composer – with one collection on his non-cinematographic corpus. Whether Rota’s music was for cinema or the concert hall was of little importance as he rolled out, to the likes of Bernard Herrmann in the United States, a style that was true to himself where one feels his genius and prowess for evoking ambiance mixed with an incredible dexterity for the most diverse genres, as can be heard in Suite taken here from La Dolce Vita. The beginning (O Venezia, Venaga, Venusia) of the following Il Casanova di Federico Fellini, in which the chiming of the pendulum evokes the tragic destiny of the character and the harmonization of somber colors creates a sea-like atmosphere, remains without a doubt one of the most striking tracks on the album. This ambiance returns in the final part, this time all the more mind-blowing (The Dancing Doll). Often influences from the East, of Chostakovitch and Khachaturian (Il Duca di Württenberg), can be heard along with more meridian styles inherited from Italian symphonists from the end of the 19th century and the beginning of the 20th century. A passionate album not to be missed. © Pierre-Yves Lascar/Qobuz
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Classical - Released September 6, 2019 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

Hi-Res Distinctions Diapason d'or / Arte
Leading the Lucerne Festival for two summers running, conductor Richardo Chailly has honoured composers that the musicians had never yet recorded: Igor Stravinsky in 2018, and Richard Strauss in 2019. The sumptuousness of the orchestration of the latter here affords a glittering clarity, just as much in the concertante parts as in the tutti. The writing conjures a Straussian atmosphere: a marvellously apt terrain for the Lucerne orchestra. In Zarathustra, the strings, in particular the double-basses, rumble away as under one bow, with gobsmacking precision in Von der großen Sehnsucht ("Of the Great Yearning") and Genesende ("the Convalescent"). Richard Strauss deploys a romantic counterpoint in his writing – in particular in Von den Hinterweltlern ("Of the Backworldsmen") – and the strings of Lucerne brilliantly bring his limitless lyricism to life. The following works, (Tod und Verklärung, Till Eulenspiegel and finally The Dance of the Seven Veils) bring to mind other epithets that we might apply to this perfect recording: epic majesty, burlesque humour, serpentine voluptuousness: all ingredients of Strauss's symphonic poems. The sound quality does justice to the beauty of the orchestra, and the mix doesn't leave anyone out: every counterpoint is defined, every pizzicato twangs appropriately and we hear even the softest touch of the timbal. Demanding in their extremity (in both nuance and difficulty), these scores make a perfect fit for the Lucerne orchestra, a meeting of the greatest soloists of the international stage, brought together by the festival. The only drawback comes from precisely this concentration of quality. While we are gripped by Salome's Dance of the Seven Veils, we are perhaps more impressed than moved by a piece that has been stripped of some of its finest orchestral ornamentation. © Elsa Siffert/Qobuz
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Classical - Released February 7, 2020 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

Hi-Res Distinctions 5 de Diapason
The “discoveries” mentioned in the title of this record are mostly pieces of occasional light music, including a few marches, written by Luigi Cherubini when he was director of the French academy of music in Paris. But the lion’s share of the album conducted by Riccardo Chailly, head of the Filamornica della Scala in Milan, is the Italian composer’s sole symphony commissioned in London as a replacement of Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony which could not meet the required deadline. The German composer greatly admired Cherubini. But, unfortunately, Cherubini is not Beethoven and his skillful Symphony in D major, once championed by Arturo Toscanini, cannot bear comparison with Beethoven’s. Maestro Chailly’s performance generates beautiful energy and excitement but the conductor’s effort cannot turn the symphony into a masterpiece. The album is released to celebrate Beethoven’s birthday. It is worth listening to if you want to discover a composer that Beethoven praised and admired. © François Hudry/Qobuz
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Symphonic Music - Released January 12, 2018 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Choc de Classica
The rediscovery of Stravinsky's Funeral Song, from a recording made in St Petersburg in Spring 2015, was a major event. Composed over the summer of 1908 in honour of his late teacher Rimsky-Korsakov, who died in June that year, it marked a moment where Stravinsky was working at many different types of writing, looking for a personal language. The work was first performed at a memorial concert in St Petersburg in January 1909 but thereafter it disappeared without a trace: the only evidence of its existence was in accounts of the concert and the composer's own nostalgic memories of the work he saw as "the best of my works before Firebird, and the most advanced in terms of chromatic harmonies." And here at last is the world's first ever recording of it! A stunning little treasure in which we can still hear Rimsky, and also the Stravinsky of Firebird, but perhaps also still the Stravinsky of the Rite of Spring, which was still very recent, a testimony to the composer's breakneck evolution. It was in the same year, 1908, that Stravinsky interrupted his writing of Fireworks when he heard the news of Rismsky's death in order to compose his Funeral Song; the Scherzo Fantastique was the last score by the young composer that the old master would ever get to read, although he never heard it performed. With this recording, Riccardo Chilly offers us a judicious selection of four works from the composer's youth (we also find The Faun and the Shepherdess of 1906, a little cycle of three melodies with orchestra, sung in French, here with Sophie Koch) followed by the big turning point that is the Rite of Spring, with a reading which is both clear and fiery. © SM/Qobuz
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Masses, Passions, Requiems - Released November 30, 2018 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
Messa per Rossini is a Requiem Mass resulting from the assembly of thirteen parts written by thirteen different composers. Shortly after Rossini's death in 1868, Verdi addressed Ricordi: "To honour the memory of Rossini I would wish the most distinguished Italian composers to compose a Requiem Mass to be performed on the anniversary of his death. I would like no foreign hand, no hand alien to art, no matter how powerful, to lend his assistance. In that case, I would withdraw at once from the association. If I were in the good graces of the Holy Father, I would beg him to allow, at least this once, women to take part in the performance of this music, but since I am not, it would be best to find a person more suitable than I to achieve this end." The composition was completed in the summer of 1869, but the hearing was cancelled... due to sinister political disputes. Verdi resumed his own contribution, the Libera me conclusive, in a revised form for his own Requiem; the comparison of the two movements, the original for Rossini and the definitive for Verdi's Requiem, is a fascinating exploration of the Verdian laboratory and evolution. The other twelve composers have hardly passed the test of posterity, but it is extremely interesting to see what was then being done in the Italian sacred domain. The Mass for Rossini, which had fallen into oblivion, was only rediscovered in the 1970s and (re)created in 1988. Here we find Riccardo Chailly at the helm with the La Scala of Milan orchestra and choir as well as four leading Italian soloists. © SM/Qobuz
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Classical - Released January 1, 2014 | Universal Music Italia srL.

Distinctions 5 de Diapason
One might think that Mendelssohn's A Midsummer Night's Dream incidental music was a work about which all that could be said has been said, but this entirely fresh recording by the venerable Gewandhaus Orchestra of Leipzig comes up with some fresh takes. First is the lithe, dry reading of the Midsummer Night's Dream music itself, the most ethereal product of Mendelssohn's teenage years. Some may miss the accretions of Victorian sweetness in conductor Riccardo Chailly's reading of the work, but even those listeners will have to marvel at the crisp sound Chailly gets out of the Leipzigers, and at the sheer effort of will involved in making the chestnut Wedding March (track 6) sound as though the conductor and musicians were encountering it for the first time. On top of this is a genuine world premiere of an early version of the Ruy Blas overture, as it was first performed in 1839 at the Gewandhaus itself, and strong performance of the two piano concertos by Israeli Arab sensation Saleem Ashkar. Nobody would put the concertos at the top of a list of Mendelssohn's compositions, but Ashkar's readings show that he was listening to what was happening around him rather than simply showing off his considerable chops. The result is a pair of tight, quick performances, as much Chailly as Ashkar, that emphasize Mendelssohn's contrapuntal thinking. A well-above-average Mendelssohn release. © TiVo
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Classical - Released January 1, 2012 | Universal Music Italia srL.

Distinctions 5 de Diapason
These "sounds of the 30s" are classical pieces, not jazz recordings or popular songs. But, from America to France to even the Soviet Union, the influence of vernacular music in the concert hall reached a high point not matched again until the 1990s and beyond. This release, reuniting the forces heard on an earlier Gershwin recording, makes sense programmatically in its collection of works influenced by popular models; the works here, with the exception of Victor de Sabata's Mille e una notte, are common enough, but they gain by being heard together. Jazz-oriented Italian pianist Stefano Bollani nails the Piano Concerto in G major of Ravel: it is a work deeply influenced by Gershwin and by the jazz Ravel heard directly in New York, but it was by no means an imitation, and it is actually one of Ravel's more intricately structured works. Tending even more toward the use of a vernacular style accent a composer's own personality is Stravinsky's Tango, which stretches out the Argentine dance's characteristic rhythms into dry, angular shapes. The Tango is included twice here, in piano and orchestral versions, for what seems to be no very good reason. Kurt Weill, by contrast, reacted to popular music by embracing it wholeheartedly; he is represented by orchestral versions of a pair of not very familiar but entirely lovely tunes. Which leaves de Sabata, better known as a conductor but also one of the original "pops" composers; Mille e una notte is a splashy work that wears out its welcome after a while but nevertheless offers an obviously much-enjoyed good time for the performers. Generally coherent, enjoyable, and recommended. © TiVo
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Classical - Released January 1, 1989 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Classical - Released October 3, 1980 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

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Classical - Released June 1, 1987 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

Classical - Released November 5, 1990 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

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Classical - Released January 1, 2004 | Universal Music Italia srL.

Opera - Released September 30, 1999 | WM Italy

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Classical - Released December 3, 1984 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

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Classical - Released July 1, 1993 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

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Classical - Released September 1, 1994 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

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Classical - Released October 1, 1981 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

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Classical - Released April 1, 1992 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

Classical - Released April 30, 1999 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

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