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Alternative & Indie - Released May 8, 2016 | XL Recordings

Distinctions 4F de Télérama - Pitchfork: Best New Music
At the close of experimental solo careers for both Thom Yorke and Phil Selway, and the film soundtracks of Jonny Greenwood, Radiohead has finally come back to the fold with their ninth studio album. It's proof that talent never leaves you, more than thirty years after the band got together. Talent yes, surprises no. In fact, the biggest surprise on A Moon Shaped Pool is that there is no surprise. The Oxford grown quintet has undoubtedly just released their most "classic" album, almost with their eyes closed. Yorke is omni-present in the sound, and you can hear his influence throughout. As such, it's like listening to an old Radiohead record, without having heard it before. Radiohead have set aside their experimental tendencies in favour of sometimes minimalist, sometimes luxurious arrangements. Even in the most impressive arrangements for strings, Jonny Greenwood seems to be aiming for purity, (see Daydreaming). His diverse works on the 7th Art and, most notably, for the director Paul Thomas Anderson (Greenwood penned the soundtracks to There will be Blood, The Master, and Inherent Vice) have clearly given him a new vision that makes its presence felt. Even on the most intimate tracks (Desert Island Discs), Radiohead maintains a certain majesty, and when they get to post-rock (Full Stop and Present Tense), their musique becomes grandiose. With such an album, Radiohead pushes the legend slightly further, preserves its distinct style, and adds to its already legendary discography.© CM/Qobuz
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Alternative & Indie - Released June 23, 2017 | XL Recordings

Hi-Res Distinctions Pitchfork: Best New Reissue
Twenty years after its summer 1997 release, OK Computer re-emerges clothed in light. In this two-part reissue: a first disc with the remastered original album; a second, 11-track disc made up of B-sides and previously unreleased titles. The sort of release that has fans in a frenzy... After the admittedly perfect classicism of The Bends (1995), Radiohead took a sort of swan dive into the ocean of a distinctly more experimental type of rock. Like revisited prog rock, subtly undermined by snatches of electronic music, OK Computer is never a mere mad scientist's laboratory, experimenting just for the fun of it. Underneath the atmospheric layering, behind the patchworks of textures inherited from Pink Floyd, R.E.M. or even Teuton krautrock (Neu! and Can spring to mind), the Oxford group never lets its attention stray from the writing. Between Thom Yorke's tortured but often lyrical (Exit Music (For A Film)) and always distinctive voice (Karma Police) and Jonny Greenwood's avant-garde guitar lines (Subterranean Homesick Alien), this third album keeps listeners on their toes. OK Computer reached a pinnacle of inventiveness, with bold harmonies, groundbreaking production and inventive instrumentation. It left its mark on its time and will continue to influence masses of groups and musicians...The second disc in OK Computer OKNOTOK 1997 2017 contains eight B-sides (Lull, Meeting In The Aisle, Melatonin, A Reminder, Polyethylene (Parts 1 & 2), Pearly, Palo Alto and How I Made My Millions) and three previously unreleased tracks (I Promise, Man Of War and Lift). Recorded in March 1998 at the Abbey Road Studios in London, Man Of War was originally intended to be on the soundtrack of the big-screen adaptation of The Avengers with Uma Thurman and Ralph Fiennes, but the group was unhappy with the result and shelved the song. However glimpses of the title's recording footage can be seen in the documentary Meeting People Is Easy. Radiohead began performing on stage in 1996 with I Promise and Lift, on a US tour as the opening act for Alanis Morissette. Hard to fathom how Lift and its heady melody did not end up on the final tracklisting of OK Computer. © MD/Qobuz
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Alternative & Indie - Released May 28, 1997 | XL Recordings

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
Using the textured soundscapes of The Bends as a launching pad, Radiohead delivered another startlingly accomplished set of modern guitar rock with OK Computer. The anthemic guitar heroics present on Pablo Honey and even The Bends are nowhere to be heard here. Radiohead have stripped away many of the obvious elements of guitar rock, creating music that is subtle and textured yet still has the feeling of rock & roll. Even at its most adventurous -- such as the complex, multi-segmented "Paranoid Android" -- the band is tight, melodic, and muscular, and Thom Yorke's voice effortlessly shifts from a sweet falsetto to vicious snarls. It's a thoroughly astonishing demonstration of musical virtuosity and becomes even more impressive with repeated listens, which reveal subtleties like electronica rhythms, eerie keyboards, odd time signatures, and complex syncopations. Yet all of this would simply be showmanship if the songs weren't strong in themselves, and OK Computer is filled with moody masterpieces, from the shimmering "Subterranean Homesick Alien" and the sighing "Karma Police" to the gothic crawl of "Exit Music (For a Film)." OK Computer is the album that established Radiohead as one of the most inventive and rewarding guitar rock bands of the '90s. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Alternative & Indie - Released March 28, 1995 | XL Recordings

Pablo Honey in no way was adequate preparation for its epic, sprawling follow-up, The Bends. Building from the sweeping, three-guitar attack that punctuated the best moments of Pablo Honey, Radiohead create a grand and forceful sound that nevertheless resonates with anguish and despair -- it's cerebral anthemic rock. Occasionally, the album displays its influences, whether it's U2, Pink Floyd, R.E.M., or the Pixies, but Radiohead turn clichés inside out, making each song sound bracingly fresh. Thom Yorke's tortured lyrics give the album a melancholy undercurrent, as does the surging, textured music. But what makes The Bends so remarkable is that it marries such ambitious, and often challenging, instrumental soundscapes to songs that are at their cores hauntingly melodic and accessible. It makes the record compelling upon first listen, but it reveals new details with each listen, and soon it becomes apparent that with The Bends, Radiohead have reinvented anthemic rock. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Alternative & Indie - Released October 2, 2000 | XL Recordings

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Alternative & Indie - Released June 9, 2003 | XL Recordings

Radiohead's admittedly assumed dilemma: how to push things forward using just the right amounts of the old and the older in order to please both sides of the divide? Taking advantage of their longest running time to date, enough space is provided to quench the thirsts of resolute Bends devotees without losing the adventurous drive or experimentation that eventually got the group into hot water with many of those same listeners. Guitars churn and chime and sound like guitars more often than not; drums are more likely to be played by a human; and discernible verses are more frequently trailed by discernible choruses. So, whether or not the group is to be considered "back," there is a certain return to relatively traditional songcraft. Had the opening "2 + 2 = 5" and "Sit Down. Stand Up." been made two years before, each song's slowly swelling intensity would have plateaued a couple minutes in, functioning as mood pieces without any release; instead, each boils over into its own cathartic tantrum. The spook-filled "Sail to the Moon," one of several songs featuring prominent piano, rivals "Street Spirit" and hovers compellingly without much sense of force carrying it along. Somewhat ironically, minus a handful of the more conventionally structured songs, the album would be almost as fractured, remote, and challenging as Amnesiac. "Backdrifts" and "The Gloaming" feature nervous electronic backdrops, while the emaciated "We Suck Young Blood" is a laggard processional that, save for one outburst, shuffles along uneasily. At nearly an hour in length, this album doesn't unleash the terse blow delivered by its two predecessors. However, despite the fact that it seems more like a bunch of songs on a disc rather than a singular body, its impact is substantial. Regardless of all the debates surrounding the group, Radiohead have entered a second decade of record-making with a surplus of momentum. ~ Andy Kellman
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Alternative & Indie - Released March 12, 2001 | XL Recordings

Faced with a deliberately difficult deviation into "experimentation," Radiohead and their record label promoted Kid A as just that -- a brave experiment, and that the next album, which was just around the corner, really, would be the "real" record, the one to satiate fans looking for the next OK Computer, or at least guitars. At the time, people bought the myth, especially since live favorites like "Knives Out" and "You and Whose Army?" were nowhere to be seen on Kid A. That, however, ignores a salient point -- Amnesiac, as the album came to be known, consists of recordings made during the Kid A sessions, so it essentially sounds the same. Since Radiohead designed Kid A as a self-consciously epochal, genre-shattering record, the songs that didn't make the cut were a little simpler, so it shouldn't be a surprise that Amnesiac plays like a streamlined version of Kid A, complete with blatant electronica moves and production that sacrifices songs for atmosphere. This, inevitably, will disappoint the legions awaiting another guitar-based record (that is, after all, what they were explicitly promised), but what were they expecting? This is an album recorded at the same time and Radiohead have a certain reputation to uphold. It would be easier to accept this if the record was better than it is. Where Kid A had shock on its side, along with an admirably dogged desire to not be conventional, Amnesiac often plays as a hodgepodge. True, it's a hodgepodge with amazing moments: the hypnotic sway of "Pyramid Song" and "You and Whose Army?," the swirling "I Might Be Wrong," "Knives Out," and the spectacular closer "Life in a Glasshouse," complete with a drunkenly swooning brass band. But, these are not moments that are markedly different than Kid A, which itself lost momentum as it sputtered to a close. And this is the main problem -- though it's nice for an artist to be generous and release two albums, these two records clearly derive from the same source and have the same flaws, which clearly would have been corrected if they had been consolidated into one record. Instead of revealing why the two records were separated, the appearance of Amnesiac makes the separation seem arbitrary -- there's no shift in tone, no shift in approach, and the division only makes the two records seem unfocused, even if the best of both records is quite stunning, proof positive that Radiohead are one of the best bands of their time. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Alternative & Indie - Released February 22, 1993 | XL Recordings

Radiohead's debut album, Pablo Honey, is a promising collection that blends U2's anthemic rock with long, atmospheric instrumental passages and an enthralling triple-guitar attack that is alternately gentle and bracingly noisy. The group has difficulty writing a set of songs that are as compelling as their sound, but when they do hit the mark -- such as on "Anyone Can Play Guitar," "Blow Out," and the self-loathing breakthrough single "Creep" -- the band achieves a rare power that is both visceral and intelligent. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Alternative & Indie - Released September 21, 1992 | XL Recordings

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Alternative & Indie - Released December 28, 2007 | XL Recordings

As varied as the rainbow it depicts, the seventh album from Radiohead reminds us all why this is one of the most influential bands of our time. While the songs that make up the record were introduced to the public through several concerts and a range of video content, the musicians, then free from all binding contracts with any record companies, decided to mix things up by launching their baby via participatory distribution. Meanwhile, the solo career of Thom Yorke, which was launched at the same time, seemed to give a new lease of life to the artists already sitting at the summit of their success. Beauty is central to In Rainbows, just listen to Reckoner, House Of Cards, Videotape, or All I Need ... And while Nude seems like its come out of Kid A, Bodysnatchers brings out the old Radiohead rock: pure and untarnished. As further proof of their musical maturity, space abounds on this record, as the artists let the music - and each other - do their thing without overegging the pudding. That being said, the standout performer remains Jonny Greenwood and his rythmic guitar hooks. To conclude, on this 2007 release, the English legends produced a hotter-than-usual record, and once again diversified their legacy. © AR/Qobuz 
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Alternative & Indie - Released February 18, 2011 | XL Recordings

For the release of their 8th studio album, released in 2011, Radiohead created a veritable controversy among their fans. The content of The King Of Limbs is difficult to access, syncopated, and sometimes a little heavy on the digestion. Often epileptic, the songs on this opus are rendered distinct by a strong rhythmic thread, woven into every song. Unlike the free-flying, and often warm, melodies on In Rainbows, The King Of Limbs prefers the coldness of the electric beat. But in the same vein as Amnesiac or Kid A, there's still a coherent whole to be deciphered through the confusing sounds. Once you listen to the record a couple of times the whole way through, it's impossible not to be impressed by at least the vision of the group, and their fearlessness in attempting to go beyond their almost sacred borders. Standout songs include but are not exlusively: Lotus Flower, Feral, Give Up The Ghost… As per usual with Radiohead, the record screams of classy production and abounding talent, filled with extra details that diehard fans and newcomers alike will lap up. The King Of Limbs is further proof that this stalwart of British music isn't quitting any time soon. © AR/Qobuz
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Alternative & Indie - Released May 21, 2001 | XL Recordings

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Alternative & Indie - Released November 12, 2001 | XL Recordings

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Alternative & Indie - Released January 11, 2019 | XL Recordings

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Alternative & Indie - Released June 23, 2017 | XL Recordings

Twenty years after its summer 1997 release, OK Computer re-emerges clothed in light. In this two-part reissue: a first disc with the remastered original album; a second, 11-track disc made up of B-sides and previously unreleased titles. The sort of release that has fans in a frenzy... After the admittedly perfect classicism of The Bends (1995), Radiohead took a sort of swan dive into the ocean of a distinctly more experimental type of rock. Like revisited prog rock, subtly undermined by snatches of electronic music, OK Computer is never a mere mad scientist's laboratory, experimenting just for the fun of it. Underneath the atmospheric layering, behind the patchworks of textures inherited from Pink Floyd, R.E.M. or even Teuton krautrock (Neu! and Can spring to mind), the Oxford group never lets its attention stray from the writing. Between Thom Yorke's tortured but often lyrical (Exit Music (For A Film)) and always distinctive voice (Karma Police) and Jonny Greenwood's avant-garde guitar lines (Subterranean Homesick Alien), this third album keeps listeners on their toes. OK Computer reached a pinnacle of inventiveness, with bold harmonies, groundbreaking production and inventive instrumentation. It left its mark on its time and will continue to influence masses of groups and musicians...The second disc in OK Computer OKNOTOK 1997 2017 contains eight B-sides (Lull, Meeting In The Aisle, Melatonin, A Reminder, Polyethylene (Parts 1 & 2), Pearly, Palo Alto and How I Made My Millions) and three previously unreleased tracks (I Promise, Man Of War and Lift). Recorded in March 1998 at the Abbey Road Studios in London, Man Of War was originally intended to be on the soundtrack of the big-screen adaptation of The Avengers with Uma Thurman and Ralph Fiennes, but the group was unhappy with the result and shelved the song. However glimpses of the title's recording footage can be seen in the documentary Meeting People Is Easy. Radiohead began performing on stage in 1996 with I Promise and Lift, on a US tour as the opening act for Alanis Morissette. Hard to fathom how Lift and its heady melody did not end up on the final tracklisting of OK Computer. © MD/Qobuz
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Alternative & Indie - Released January 22, 1996 | XL Recordings

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Alternative & Indie - Released January 12, 1998 | XL Recordings

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Alternative & Indie - Released August 25, 1997 | XL Recordings

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Alternative & Indie - Released December 19, 2011 | XL Recordings

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Alternative & Indie - Released March 24, 2004 | XL Recordings

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Radiohead in the magazine