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Duets - Released February 1, 2019 | Avie Records

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
The title Fiddler's Blues refers here only to the celebrated "Blues" slow movement of the Violin Sonata No. 2 in G major of Ravel; there's nothing particularly bluesy about the rest of the music on the album. Instead, French violinist Philippe Graffin offers a collection of French solo and piano-accompanied violin pieces, mostly little-known, and in three cases never before heard. The big news is the Sonate posthume pour violon seul, Op. 27bis: a seventh solo violin sonata to go with the existing six of Eugène Ysaÿe. Graffin found the work in manuscript at a library in Brussels, incomplete but largely having received its general shape, and completed it. One may speculate as to why the composer abandoned it; various good answers suggest themselves, from the coherence of the existing group of six to the difference in style of this one from the others: it's shorter, tonally more conservative, and generally simpler. This said, it's a genuine rediscovery of a work by a major composer, and to a non-violinist, the joints where Graffin has added material are not apparent. There's also a small work by Ysaÿe and an entirely original arrangement of Debussy's Clair de lune, a work you might not think would be susceptible to such a thing, for solo violin; these are both new. Elsewhere, there are two more major works, the Ravel sonata and a lively little-known sonata "dans le caractère roumaine," in the Romanian popular style, of Enescu. Any one of these might attract you (sample the first movement of the Enescu), and there are also short pieces by Ravel and Enescu to bring down the curtain. A delightful recital in the French tradition, with clean, circumspect accompaniment from pianist Claire Désert. © TiVo
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Classical - Released January 1, 2006 | Avie Records

Distinctions 4 étoiles du Monde de la Musique
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Classical - Released October 22, 2008 | Onyx Classics

The title of this Onyx album, Hungarian Dances, does not appear to be overly original on its surface. What is unique, however, is from where it draws its inspiration. Rather than assembling a random program of Hungarian Dances, violinist Philippe Graffin selects his program in part from references made by Jessica Duchen's novel Hungarian Dances. With so many obvious opportunities for collaboration between the various arts, it's a shame that cooperative efforts like this one don't occur more often. For those who have read Duchen's novel, this album is a practically indispensible companion, adding an entirely new level of understanding to the writing. For those just in it for the music, this album still provides an engaging and varied set of pieces, many of which may be completely unfamiliar. A student of Josef Gingold, Graffin has the Hungarian, gypsy-quality sound totally mastered, playing with just the right amount of gruff aggressiveness and flamboyancy. His interplay with pianist Claire Desert is sparkling and entirely symbiotic. Intonation is generally quite solid, although some pitches escape Graffin in the highest registers of his instrument. In this style of music, however, precision is not always necessary or even desired, and listeners will almost surely appreciate Graffin's efforts. © TiVo
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Classical - Released July 5, 2010 | Onyx Classics

Schumann's Cello Concerto -- long one of the standards and favorites of the cello repertoire -- was written in a flurry of activity in 1850. Although the composer did not live to hear his masterpiece performed on its intended instrument, Schumann did see fit to make an arrangement (dedicated, of course, to Joseph Joachim) for violin and orchestra. Because the composer himself saw fit to make such an arrangement, perhaps it should be a commonly accepted alternative. But purists out there are likely to be resolved that Op. 129 is undeniably a cello concerto. Nonetheless, violinist Philippe Graffin, accompanied by the Deutsche Radio Philharmonie Saarbrücken Kaiserlautern, has set out on this Onyx album to lay down a recording of the violin version. For his own part, Graffin's playing is exemplary. His intonation is flawless, tone is beautiful, phrasing is impeccable, and connection with the orchestra is palpable. Still, the dark colors and the dolorous soulfulness of the cello is missing. The album continues with a completely satisfying reading of Clara Schumann's Op. 22 Three Romances for Violin and Piano with pianist Claire Désert. The violin sounds much more at home here, and Graffin's playing is allowed to shine without the need to compare it to another instrument. His intense Romanticism and expressive tone continue with Schumann's Second Violin Sonata, a work Joachim declared to be one of the most significant chamber compositions for his instrument to date. Whether an individual listener approves of the violin version of the cello concerto or not, Graffin proves himself to be a formidable player with a tone and understanding of Schumann's writing that yields highly enjoyable results. © TiVo
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Classical - Released July 24, 2015 | Dutton Epoch

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Classical - Released January 24, 2014 | Cobra Records

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Classical - Released May 27, 2016 | COBRA RECORDS

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Classical - Released December 16, 2013 | Cobra Records

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Classical - Released August 1, 2014 | Cobra Records

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Classical - Released May 27, 2016 | Cobra Records

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Classical - Released June 27, 2011 | Onyx Classics