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Rock - Released November 11, 2016 | Omnivore Recordings

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Rock - Released October 20, 2017 | Omnivore Recordings

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Rock - Released March 16, 2018 | Omnivore Recordings

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Rock - Released May 11, 1993 | Legacy - Columbia

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Rock - Released October 26, 2018 | Omnivore Recordings

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Rock - Released September 28, 2018 | Omnivore Recordings

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Rock - Released September 28, 2018 | Blue Plate Music

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Pop - Released January 1, 1989 | New Rounder

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Pop - Released January 1, 1989 | Virgin Records

After a dozen or so years on Rounder Records, NRBQ signed on with Virgin for the Andy Paley co-produced Wild Weekend (1989). The quartet retains its eclectic range of pop and rock mayhem, adapting several well-worn concert favorites for this studio platter. Nowhere is that more evident than the opening title track, which Terry Adams, Joey Spampinato, and Al Anderson have adapted from the Rockin' Rebels instrumental that was originally called simply "Wild Weekend." (The Q's remake was also prominently featured in The Simpsons' tenth-season episode, Sunday Cruddy Sunday.) Adams gives Crescent City props to zydeco pioneer Boozoo Chavis on "Boozoo, That's Who!" (recalling the band's "Captain Lou" Albano homage), with both Boozoo (accordion) and Charles Chavis (rub board) as well as longtime friend John Sebastian (autoharp) all putting their respective two cents in. Equaling Anderson's lead guitar are his incomparable skills as a composer. The automobile anthem "Little Floater" and the brisk-tempo "Boy's Life" are two of the best entries on the album. The same can be said of Spampinato's closer, the driving rockabilly-tinged "Like a Locomotive." It incorporates and complements the bassist's timeless melodic sense with the combo's simple yet effective no-nonsense performance. ~ Lindsay Planer
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Pop - Released January 25, 2011 | Rhino

This title became the final studio effort from NRBQ to include Al Anderson (guitar/vocals), marking the conclusion of their 23-year association. The split was ultimately amicable, with Anderson effectively retiring from both the band as well as touring, preferring to mine his considerable songwriting talents in Nashville, TN. Message for the Mess Age includes a baker's dozen of originals -- many of which quickly became performance standards -- all epitomizing NRBQ's uncanny brand of omni-pop. It is fitting that both the Whole Wheat Horns -- featuring Donn Adams (trombone) and Gary Windo (tenor sax) -- as well as Johnny Spampinato, Anderson's replacement and brother of co-founding member Joey Spampinato, are included in the proceedings. However, his contributions to this release are decidedly un-stringed, as he fleshes out the horn section performing on trumpet during the Terry Adams- (keyboards/vocals) penned bit of dadaism titled "Spampinato." Each of the highly individualistic writing styles that have become synonymous with the band are explored. Terry Adams' straight-ahead, driving rock, which is often enhanced with interesting key changes and a somewhat quirky chorus, is heard on tracks such as "Over Your Head," "Girl Scout Cookies," and the atonal jazz fusion-influenced "Everybody's Smokin'." Joey Spampinato's beautifully constructed melodies -- which are at times reminiscent of Paul McCartney or Brian Wilson -- can be found on "Don't Bite the Head" and the mid-tempo ballad "Ramona." The latter track even pays homage to the Fab Four with the lyric "Just love me do/Don't love me not." Equally strong -- if not arguably stronger -- are the compositions by Anderson. His upbeat love songs, "A Little Bit of Bad" and "Nothin' Wrong With Me," definitely lean into the cosmopolitan country music that would consume his post-NRBQ activities. ~ Lindsay Planer
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Rock - Released January 1, 1999 | New Rounder

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