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Jazz - Released August 20, 2010 | ECM

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography - Hi-Res Audio
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Vocal Jazz - Released January 17, 2014 | ECM

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Vocal Jazz - Released February 16, 2018 | ECM

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Norma Winstone has found a dream home with the ECM label, a house in her own image… As part of Azimuth, the trio that she formed between 1977 and 2000 with trumpet player Kenny Wheeler and pianist John Taylor, her husband; or alone, the British artist has always been a jazz singer apart. Here, Norma Winstone brings her unique timbre to the big screen. She covers the films of Scorsese (Taxi Driver), Godard (My Life to Live), Wenders (Lisbon Story), Jewison (The Thomas Crown Affair), Zeffirelli (Romeo and Juliette), De Sica (Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow) and several others. With Descansado which she dedicated to her late colleagues John and Kenny, she has chosen a great repertoire of scores from composers such as Bernard Hermann, Michel Legrand, Ennio Morricone, Nino Rota and William Walton. The stripped-down and original arrangements from German saxophonist and clarinettist Klaus Gesing and Italian pianist Glauco Venier give her room to assume complete ownership of this music, which we never imagined in a jazz or quasi-chamber music setting. Norwegian percussionist Helge Andreas Norbakken and Italian cellist Mario Brunello came to round off this team of discerning artists who give this music an utterly fascinating, velvet light. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Jazz - Released March 11, 2008 | ECM

Norma Winstone's refreshingly honest and understated vocal talents have gone largely under-recognized in the United States, but with her return to the ECM label, perhaps listeners worldwide will give her another try. Singing better than ever while exploring the deeper regions of human strength and frailty, Winstone and her outstanding, drummerless group featuring the excellent team of Italian pianist Glauco Venier and German reedman Klaus Gesing, are simply matched in heaven, high above the clouds and this mortal coil. All hushed tones or thematic nuances are played to the hilt with wisps of smoke and a modicum of smoldering heat. Venier is quite accomplished, following in footsteps of the great ECM pianists like Bobo Stenson, Mike Nock, and the introspective Keith Jarrett, while Gesing plays poetic bass clarinet and soprano saxophone as echoes in the "distance" of the horizons of a new day. A consummate interpreter, Winstone adopts the standard "Everytime We Say Goodbye" in a most poignant, languid fashion aside Gesing's fox hunt soprano tones and Venier's delicate musings, while taking Peter Gabriel's "Here Comes the Flood" in echoes of impending fear and very understated regret. Then there's "A Song for England," an entertainingly funny and self-deprecatingly pitiful look at her home country, with a light bass clarinet groove, some scat, and spare lyrics about British weather and the moods it incites. Naturally melancholy, "Distance" weaves the common theme of hauntingly unfulfilled love into the mix, "Drifter" is a tip-toeing, spatial piece, typically ECM chamber style, with lyrics stating her male friend "always knew he'd do what he wanted to do, the way that a wind changes its direction will turn, and leave you wondering, where did summer go?" Venier composed several of these selections with an acute vision of dreamy imagery, with "Gorizia" in a traipsing waltz with Winstone's wordless vocals, while "The Mermaid" is the ultimate surreal fantasy myth visage, as scratched-out chicken rhythms are juxtaposed against probing and zinged piano techniques while the singer tells her siren tale. The most optimistic track is the reflective, ongoing idealistic "Remembering the Start of a Never Ending Story," while the alluring "Giant's Gentle Stride" holds a spirit song mentality close to heart in a deeper mode, with Gesing's lilting soprano and Venier's wonderful, minimalist piano chord variations. From beginning to end, this recording is a beautiful document of Winstone's intelligent and lissome persona fully realized, and with the empathetic accompaniment wrapped up in this uniquely compelling music, has to rank as her very best recorded effort in a career that is still gaining creative momentum. ~ Michael G. Nastos
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Jazz - Released February 26, 2016 | ECM

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Jazz - Released February 26, 2016 | ECM

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Jazz - Released November 4, 2008 | ECM

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Contemporary Jazz - Released July 2, 2007 | Enodoc Records

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Vocal Jazz - Released February 16, 2018 | ECM

Booklet
Norma Winstone has found a dream home with the ECM label, a house in her own image… As part of Azimuth, the trio that she formed between 1977 and 2000 with trumpet player Kenny Wheeler and pianist John Taylor, her husband; or alone, the British artist has always been a jazz singer apart. Here, Norma Winstone brings her unique timbre to the big screen. She covers the films of Scorsese (Taxi Driver), Godard (My Life to Live), Wenders (Lisbon Story), Jewison (The Thomas Crown Affair), Zeffirelli (Romeo and Juliette), De Sica (Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow) and several others. With Descansado which she dedicated to her late colleagues John and Kenny, she has chosen a great repertoire of scores from composers such as Bernard Hermann, Michel Legrand, Ennio Morricone, Nino Rota and William Walton. The stripped-down and original arrangements from German saxophonist and clarinettist Klaus Gesing and Italian pianist Glauco Venier give her room to assume complete ownership of this music, which we never imagined in a jazz or quasi-chamber music setting. Norwegian percussionist Helge Andreas Norbakken and Italian cellist Mario Brunello came to round off this team of discerning artists who give this music an utterly fascinating, velvet light. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Jazz - Released October 13, 2017 | Sunnyside

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Jazz - Released October 13, 2017 | Sunnyside

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Jazz - Released January 17, 2020 | Sunnyside

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Jazz - Released October 13, 2017 | Sunnyside

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Jazz - Released January 20, 2014 | Dusk Fire

British jazz vocalist Norma Winstone's solo debut is an entrancing meld of creative composition, improvisation, and arrangement. Winstone is no ordinary jazz singer. Her grasp of the entire tradition is as complete as her improvising chops are sharp. Winstone surrounds herself with the cream of the crop of Britain's brilliant jazz wunderkind here: Kenny Wheeler, Paul Rutherford, Art Themen, Chris Pyne, Chris Laurence, and John Taylor, just to name a few. She embraces the vocal tradition in order to stretch it on the album's centerpiece, "Enjoy This Day," with glorious interplay between Winstone and Wheeler (whose solo is one of the best of his early career) led by John Taylor's two-handed harmonic extrapolations -- the tune was composed by Winstone and Taylor and he arranged it. As she shimmers through "Enjoy This Day," the vanguard tonalities of John Surman's "Erebus (Son of Chaos)," and the elegant balladic traditionalism of "Songs for a Child," Winstone's commitment to offering new vistas for voice is total, matched only by her astounding ability to erect new vocal architectures in phrasing, breath control, and pure emotional transcendence. Of the seven selections here, each is a new chapter, a new way of hearing and engaging a vocalist at her most restless, yet who remains in absolute control. ~ Thom Jurek
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Jazz - Released October 13, 2015 | Splasc(h) Records

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Jazz - Released August 12, 1999 | Grappa

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Jazz - Released January 19, 2018 | ECM