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Pop/Rock - Released April 12, 2019 | Blue Note Records

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Labels have never been her thing… Jazz, pop, country, folk, world, Norah Jones has always played music that she has to blur boundaries. And that her collaborators include legends of jazz like Wayne Shorter, of soul like Ray Charles, of country like Willie Nelson, of rap like Q-Tip and of rock’n’roll like Keith Richards, this American has worked tirelessly to, above all, be herself. A serene and beautifully nonchalant voice capable of inhabiting her own themes as well as revisiting any song. Three years after the ambitious Day Breaks, this brief Begin Again (28 minutes, 7 tracks) is more than just a thrown-together collection of tracks. Instead, it’s a new self-portrait, alternating between assumed pop (My Heart is Full), expressive soul (It was You) and up-tempo jazz (Begin Again). To stay amongst people of taste, Jeff Tweedy from Wilco made appearances on the magnificent A Song with No Name and Wintertime. Surrounded as always by the finest musicians (Brian Blade's velvet drums are wonderful), Norah Jones masterfully guides us through this no-man’s land of a little bit of jazz, a bit pop, a bit soul. And it's as enjoyable as ever. © Clotilde Maréchal/Qobuz
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Pop - Released October 7, 2016 | Blue Note (BLU)

Norah Jones took liberty with her blockbuster success to set out on a musical walkabout, spending a good portion of the decade following 2004's Feels Like Home experimenting, either on her own albums or on a variety of collaborations. Day Breaks, released four years after the atmospheric adult alternative pop of the Danger Mouse-produced Little Broken Hearts, finds Jones returning home to an extent: it, like her 2002 debut Come Away with Me, is a singer/songwriter album with roots in pop and jazz, divided between originals and sharply selected covers. Such similarities are immediately apparent, but Day Breaks is much slyer than a mere revival. That term suggests a slight air of desperation, but Jones comes from a place of confidence on Day Breaks, happy to demonstrate everything she's learned over the years. Often, these tricks are deliberately sly: she'll pair her torchy original "And Then There Was You" with a woozy, bluesy cover of Neil Young's "Don't Be Denied" that winds up evoking Come Away with Me, then follow that up with the dense, nocturnal rhythms of "Day Breaks." She threads in versions of Horace Silver's "Peace" and Duke Ellington's "African Flower" while inviting saxophonist Wayne Shorter and organist Lonnie Smith in to play -- moves that signal that there's a strong, elastic jazz undercurrent to Day Breaks that means this record breathes more than her debut. Such a sense of quiet adventure gives the record depth, but what gives it resonance are the exquisitely sculpted songs. Jones' originals feel as elegant as time-honored standards, and all her covers feel fresh. The former speak to her craft, the latter to her gifts as a stylist, and the two combine to turn Day Breaks into a satisfying testament to her ever-evolving musicianship. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Pop - Released January 1, 2009 | Blue Note Records

With The Fall, Norah Jones completes the transition away from her smooth cabaret beginnings and toward a mellowly arty, modern singer/songwriter. Jones began this shift on 2007's Not Too Late, an album that gently rejected her tendencies for lulling, tasteful crooning, but The Fall is a stronger, more cohesive work, maintaining an elegantly dreamy state that's faithful to the crooner of Come Away with Me while feeling decidedly less classicist. Some of this could be attributed to Jones' choice of producer, Jacquire King, best-known for his work with Modest Mouse and Kings of Leon, but King hardly pushes Norah in a rock direction; The Fall does bear some mild echoes of Fiona Apple or Aimee Mann in ballad mode, but its arrangements never call attention to themselves, the way that some Jon Brion productions do. Instead, the focus is always on Jones' voice and songs, which are once again all originals, sometimes composed in conjunction with collaborators including her longtime colleagues Jesse Harris, Ryan Adams, and Will Sheff of Okkervil River. In addition to King's pedigree, the latter two co-writers suggest a slight indie bent to Jones' direction, which isn't an inaccurate impression -- there's certainly a late-night N.Y.C. vibe to these songs -- but it's easy to overstate the artiness of The Fall, especially when compared to Not Too Late, which wore its ragged ambitions proudly. Here, Jones ties up loose ends, unafraid to sound smooth or sultry, letting in just enough dissonance and discord to give this dimension, creating a subtle but rather extraordinary low-key record that functions as a piece of mood music but lingers longer, thanks to its finely crafted songs. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo

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Norah Jones in the magazine
  • Qobuz: Exclusive Interview with Norah Jones
    Qobuz: Exclusive Interview with Norah Jones Ahead of her new album release this coming Friday, 7th October, Marc Zisman of Qobuz had the opportunity to sit with the world renowned jazz artist to chat about life, music, and more...