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Soul - Released March 9, 2018 | Stax

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It’s hardly a coincidence that Nathaniel Rateliff is at Stax. With his band The Night Sweats, the native of Denver has become a true ambassador of this muggy southern soul as it was practised on the infamous Memphis label at the end of the sixties. With his instrumental virtuosity, the soul of his songs, the ardour of their interpretation and the preaching of his organ, Tearing at the Seams glorifies the spirit of a vast heritage ranging from Otis Redding to Van Morrison, through Booker T. and the MG’s, Ray Charles and Creedence Clearwater Revival. As can be expected, the rhythmic turbine goes at a million miles an hour, the brass are as incandescent as possible and the voice of Reteliff is a furious rattle that is completely his own. This gang does not care to look in the rearview mirror despite assuming a rather nostalgic sound. © Max Dembo/Qobuz
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Soul - Released March 9, 2018 | Stax

It’s hardly a coincidence that Nathaniel Rateliff is at Stax. With his band The Night Sweats, the native of Denver has become a true ambassador of this muggy southern soul as it was practised on the infamous Memphis label at the end of the sixties. With his instrumental virtuosity, the soul of his songs, the ardour of their interpretation and the preaching of his organ, Tearing at the Seams glorifies the spirit of a vast heritage ranging from Otis Redding to Van Morrison, through Booker T. and the MG’s, Ray Charles and Creedence Clearwater Revival. As can be expected, the rhythmic turbine goes at a million miles an hour, the brass are as incandescent as possible and the voice of Reteliff is a furious rattle that is completely his own. This gang does not care to look in the rearview mirror despite assuming a rather nostalgic sound. © Max Dembo/Qobuz
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Soul - Released January 1, 2015 | Stax

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Songwriter Nathaniel Rateliff established himself as a critically celebrated folksy Americana singer/songwriter on 2010's In Memory of Loss, his Rounder Records debut. Though he played in straight-ahead rock & roll bands before then, his independent releases since have been of intimate, poignant, and pensive songs. Until now. This self-titled offering on Stax is a hard-swinging, house-rocking affair that draws heavily on vintage R&B, soul, and proto rock & roll. Though Rateliff has displayed emotion in his vocals since the beginning, even fans have never heard him like this. Influences from Sam & Dave to Van Morrison to Sam Cooke range freely on this set -- and he has the voice to pull it off. The sessions were helmed by producer Richard Swift, who captured Rateliff and his large band -- complete with a swaggering horn section (and occasionally subtle strings) -- with just enough reverb to make it sound live. "I've Been Falling," with its upright piano and handclaps, delves deep into vintage Morrison territory without really emulating him (though Rateliff comes closer on the album's last track, "Mellow Out"). The raw soul passion in "Trying So Hard Not to Know" evokes the historic Stax ethos perfectly, while sidling up to the Band's Big Pink era. "S.O.B." has verses saturated in Southern gospel, with foot stomping and handclaps as the only accompaniment, before the entire band erupts in a carousing chorus. This reverses gospel's usual Saturday-night-to-Sunday-morning course; it is one of the rowdiest broken-heart songs you'll ever hear. "I'd Be Waiting" is a tender, wide-open love song with a late-night jazzy soul feel. The singer's voice is haunted equally by the spirits of Cooke and Bobby "Blue" Bland. If this album has a weakness -- and it does -- it's that Rateliff's use of these forms and styles in his writing is not only basic -- which is fine -- but overly formulaic. Only the pedal steel-driven Americana in the absolutely lovely "Wasting Time" -- which recalls the Gregg Allman of Laid Back -- deviates; one or two more songs in this vein (especially with this band) would have made all the difference. That's a small complaint, one that will deter few. Rateliff's world-weary, deeply expressive tenor and lyrics place him on a different level than any of the current crew of revivalists. ~ Thom Jurek
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Soul - Released March 9, 2018 | Stax

It’s hardly a coincidence that Nathaniel Rateliff is at Stax. With his band The Night Sweats, the native of Denver has become a true ambassador of this muggy southern soul as it was practised on the infamous Memphis label at the end of the sixties. With his instrumental virtuosity, the soul of his songs, the ardour of their interpretation and the preaching of his organ, Tearing at the Seams glorifies the spirit of a vast heritage ranging from Otis Redding to Van Morrison, through Booker T. and the MG’s, Ray Charles and Creedence Clearwater Revival. As can be expected, the rhythmic turbine goes at a million miles an hour, the brass are as incandescent as possible and the voice of Reteliff is a furious rattle that is completely his own. This gang does not care to look in the rearview mirror despite assuming a rather nostalgic sound. © Max Dembo/Qobuz
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Rock - Released January 1, 2015 | Stax

Songwriter Nathaniel Rateliff established himself as a critically celebrated folksy Americana singer/songwriter on 2010's In Memory of Loss, his Rounder Records debut. Though he played in straight-ahead rock & roll bands before then, his independent releases since have been of intimate, poignant, and pensive songs. Until now. This self-titled offering on Stax is a hard-swinging, house-rocking affair that draws heavily on vintage R&B, soul, and proto rock & roll. Though Rateliff has displayed emotion in his vocals since the beginning, even fans have never heard him like this. Influences from Sam & Dave to Van Morrison to Sam Cooke range freely on this set -- and he has the voice to pull it off. The sessions were helmed by producer Richard Swift, who captured Rateliff and his large band -- complete with a swaggering horn section (and occasionally subtle strings) -- with just enough reverb to make it sound live. "I've Been Falling," with its upright piano and handclaps, delves deep into vintage Morrison territory without really emulating him (though Rateliff comes closer on the album's last track, "Mellow Out"). The raw soul passion in "Trying So Hard Not to Know" evokes the historic Stax ethos perfectly, while sidling up to the Band's Big Pink era. "S.O.B." has verses saturated in Southern gospel, with foot stomping and handclaps as the only accompaniment, before the entire band erupts in a carousing chorus. This reverses gospel's usual Saturday-night-to-Sunday-morning course; it is one of the rowdiest broken-heart songs you'll ever hear. "I'd Be Waiting" is a tender, wide-open love song with a late-night jazzy soul feel. The singer's voice is haunted equally by the spirits of Cooke and Bobby "Blue" Bland. If this album has a weakness -- and it does -- it's that Rateliff's use of these forms and styles in his writing is not only basic -- which is fine -- but overly formulaic. Only the pedal steel-driven Americana in the absolutely lovely "Wasting Time" -- which recalls the Gregg Allman of Laid Back -- deviates; one or two more songs in this vein (especially with this band) would have made all the difference. That's a small complaint, one that will deter few. Rateliff's world-weary, deeply expressive tenor and lyrics place him on a different level than any of the current crew of revivalists. ~ Thom Jurek
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Rock - Released November 10, 2017 | Stax

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Ambient/New Age - Released November 24, 2017 | Stax

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Rock - Released November 10, 2017 | Stax

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Soul - Released November 18, 2016 | Stax

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After issuing their self-titled debut album in 2015, Colorado's indie roots rock and soul outfit Nathaniel Rateliff & the Night Sweats have worked the road hard. They've played from coast to coast and beyond. Their debut achieved gold status -- something quite rare in the digital age (especially for a first outing). In addition, their singles "S.O.B." "I Need Never Get Old," and "Look It Here" have all received massive airplay and streaming. This EP is what happens when a band has to have something new to sell while on the road and doesn't have enough time to cut a proper follow-up album. A Little Something More From is an eight-track stopgap. As such, it's pretty much a fans-only affair. The first three tunes were recorded in a Colorado living room and produced by drummer Patrick Meese. All are studio versions of concert favorites, including the horn-drenched rave-up "Parlor," the Little Willie John-esque fingerpopper "I Did It," and the soul review-styled second version of "Out on the Weekend" (sequenced first). The live version of "Wasting Time" was cut at the Stax Soul Museum by Sirius XM. This tune has an intro and middle eight that comes uncomfortably close to the Band's "The Weight," while the melody adds up to what Jackson Browne's "These Days" would sound like arranged for horns and a stronger singer. "What I Need" is a B-side from the Howling at Nothing EP -- and sounds like it. The Richard Swift-produced "Just to Talk to You" is a solo acoustic blues that harkens back to Rateliff's years as a solo singer/songwriter with Rounder. He obviously likes Lightnin' Hopkins. The set closer is "Late Night Party (Out on the Weekend, Version I)," a slow, intimate, stripped-down shuffler; it's like the demo version of its earlier counterpart. If you're an eager follower of Rateliff & the Night Sweats, you may need this; for the rest of us, waiting to see what album two holds may be more prudent. ~ Thom Jurek
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Rock - Released July 6, 2018 | Stax

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Rock - Released November 18, 2016 | Stax

Rock - Released January 1, 2015 | Stax

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Rock - Released January 1, 2015 | Stax

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Rock - Released June 23, 2015 | Stax

Rock - Released May 18, 2015 | Stax

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Soul - Released November 18, 2016 | Stax

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