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Pop/Rock - Released December 5, 1997 | Columbia - Legacy

Mountain was the combined forces of Leslie West, a gigantic guitarist/vocalist who had played with New York garage-psych rockers the Vagrants, and Felix Pappalardi. Pappalardi had a slightly more impressive track record, coming from the modern East Coast folk-rock movement (the Youngbloods), before he applied his production skills to Cream. Through this, Felix never really stopped playing and eventually formed Mountain. Often billed as a junior-league version of Cream, Climbing!, Mountain's debut, had a lot of things going for it as well. Indeed, West was a changed man from the moment he saw Clapton play, and Pappalardi was able to help him achieve the exact same tone Clapton employed on Disraeli Gears. The hit off Climbing!, "Mississippi Queen" is a boogie classic, and it paved the way for countless imitators such as J. Geils Band, Foghat, and others. There are a lot of other great tracks here, such as "Never in My Life," which was an FM radio staple at the time. © Matthew Greenwald /TiVo
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Rock - Released July 26, 2019 | Columbia - Legacy

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Rock - Released June 29, 1998 | Columbia - Legacy

Three prior Mountain collections, 1973's THE BEST OF, 1974's ON TOP, and 1995's box set OVER THE TOP, left few stones unturned in their overviews of these short-lived yet successful power rockers. If you're looking for a succinct collection of their best-known tracks, then 1998's budget priced SUPER HITS is recommended. Containing 10 tracks, SUPER HITS features such classic rock radio standards as "Mississippi Queen," "Never in My Life," "Theme for an Imaginary Western," and "Flowers of Evil." Although THE BEST OF may have a longer track listing, SUPER HITS contains several tracks not included on the former, which rank among some of the band's best--"Flowers of Evil," "Blood of the Sun," "You Better Believe It," and "The Great Train Robbery." © TiVo
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Pop/Rock - Released December 11, 1997 | Columbia - Legacy

Mountain's meteoric ride through the early '70s was as memorable as it was brief -- so much so that this excellent greatest-hits set was released less than four years after the band had inaugurated their career at Woodstock. In retrospect, its easy to understand why the strange chemistry (pun intended) struck between boogie-loving, Clapton-worshiping guitar hero Leslie West and eclectic bassist and Cream producer Felix Pappalardi was fated to be a short one. But during their brief run, Mountain's adventurous proto-metal did indeed resemble a somewhat twisted but effective American version of the legendary power trio that inspired them. Of course, Mountain would continue to re-form off and on over the years, but seeing as most of their later efforts were disappointingly under par, this set covers all the stuff you'll need -- most essentially, Homer Simpson's favorite song, the immortal "Mississippi Queen." © Eduardo Rivadavia /TiVo
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Pop/Rock - Released April 3, 2003 | Columbia - Legacy

Following the success of Climbing! and appearances at Woodstock and other outdoor festivals of the day, Mountain recorded more of the same for Nantucket Sleighride. The title track is a nice mixture of classical-leaning intertwined with moderate rock; both "Don't Look Around" and "The Animal Trainer and the Toad" continue on the hard rock path so well-worn by this band. Not groundbreaking, but it is well worth listening to. © James Chrispell /TiVo
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Rock - Released June 12, 1992 | Legacy - Columbia

Following the success of Climbing! and appearances at Woodstock and other outdoor festivals of the day, Mountain recorded more of the same for Nantucket Sleighride. The title track is a nice mixture of classical-leaning intertwined with moderate rock; both "Don't Look Around" and "The Animal Trainer and the Toad" continue on the hard rock path so well-worn by this band. Not groundbreaking, but it is well worth listening to. © James Chrispell /TiVo
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Pop/Rock - Released April 12, 1996 | Columbia - Legacy

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Pop - Released September 5, 1989 | Windfall - Columbia

Now this is more like it! Recorded in Osaka, Japan, in 1973, Twin Peaks was Mountain's second consecutive live album (with The Best of Mountain compilation between them), albeit featuring the re-formed, somewhat reconfigured version of the group, consisting of Leslie West (guitar, vocals), Felix Pappalardi (bass, vocals), Bob Mann (guitar, keyboards), and Allan Schwartzberg (drums). It overlaps with its predecessor, Mountain Live (The Road Goes Ever On) on only two cuts, "Crossroader" and "Nantucket Sleighride," and the latter is stretched out even further here than it was on the earlier album, to 32 minutes. The content ends up showing off the best and the worst attributes of Mountain -- the best being such staples as "Theme from an Imaginary Western," "Mississippi Queen," "Never in My Life," and "Roll Over Beethoven," while the worst is "Nantucket Sleighride." But even the latter, at over half-an-hour, was precisely what audiences of the period were paying to see and hear, and captures the band's music in all of its excessive glory. Additionally, "Nantucket Sleighride" doesn't seem that long in the actual listening, mostly because it's difficult not to be impressed with the playing, especially the guitar dialogue between West and Mann. A worthy document of a Mountain concert at their summit, this album has appeared on CD from both Columbia Records and Repertoire. The latter version, remastered in 2006, offers superior sound and packaging. © James Chrispell & Bruce Eder /TiVo
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Rock - Released April 11, 1995 | Legacy - Columbia

Over the Top is right. Two discs of Mountain, complete with all the AOR hits, unreleased tracks, two newly recorded songs, a nearly six-minute guitar solo, and a 20-minute jam is a bit much for anyone but the most devoted Leslie West fans, yet the number of rarities and classy packaging make the set a necessary item for the dedicated. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Rock - Released July 24, 1992 | Legacy - Columbia

Mountain was the combined forces of Leslie West, a gigantic guitarist/vocalist who had played with New York garage-psych rockers the Vagrants, and Felix Pappalardi. Pappalardi had a slightly more impressive track record, coming from the modern East Coast folk-rock movement (the Youngbloods), before he applied his production skills to Cream. Through this, Felix never really stopped playing and eventually formed Mountain. Often billed as a junior-league version of Cream, Climbing!, Mountain's debut, had a lot of things going for it as well. Indeed, West was a changed man from the moment he saw Clapton play, and Pappalardi was able to help him achieve the exact same tone Clapton employed on Disraeli Gears. The hit off Climbing!, "Mississippi Queen" is a boogie classic, and it paved the way for countless imitators such as J. Geils Band, Foghat, and others. There are a lot of other great tracks here, such as "Never in My Life," which was an FM radio staple at the time. © Matthew Greenwald /TiVo
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Rock - Released July 12, 2011 | Columbia - Legacy

Mountain were a thundering live band, channeling Cream through a kind of American heavy metal blender, and at the group's peak between 1969 and 1971, with the classic trio lineup of Leslie West on guitar, Felix Pappalardi on bass, and Corky Laing on drums, they were as good as any hard rock band anywhere. This set collects several live tracks from that period, including two songs Mountain did at the Woodstock Festival in 1969 (with N.D. Smart on drums -- Laing replaced him in the band soon after), "Long Red" and "Waiting to Take You Away," a version of "Nantucket Sleighride" from a New Year's Eve show at the Fillmore East in 1970, and a rendition of their biggest hit, "Mississippi Queen," from a show at the Fillmore East in the spring of 1971, all powerful live tracks from a band in its touring prime. © Steve Leggett /TiVo
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Rock - Released February 1, 1973 | Windfall - Columbia

Mountain's meteoric ride through the early '70s was as memorable as it was brief -- so much so that this excellent greatest-hits set was released less than four years after the band had inaugurated their career at Woodstock. In retrospect, its easy to understand why the strange chemistry (pun intended) struck between boogie-loving, Clapton-worshiping guitar hero Leslie West and eclectic bassist and Cream producer Felix Pappalardi was fated to be a short one. But during their brief run, Mountain's adventurous proto-metal did indeed resemble a somewhat twisted but effective American version of the legendary power trio that inspired them. Of course, Mountain would continue to re-form off and on over the years, but seeing as most of their later efforts were disappointingly under par, this set covers all the stuff you'll need -- most essentially, Homer Simpson's favorite song, the immortal "Mississippi Queen." © Eduardo Rivadavia /TiVo
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Pop/Rock - Released September 13, 1972 | Legacy Recordings

Live performances were where Mountain always shone, and this document of some of their concert fare shows how they took a rather ordinary song and expanded it with lots of jamming and improvising. The side-long (on vinyl) "Nantucket Sleighride" does show signs of the excess that would plague the band for the rest of its career. A fair example of Mountain live. © James Chrispell /TiVo
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Hard Rock - Released October 26, 2017 | Big Rack Records

When the two original members of Mountain, guitarist Leslie West and drummer Corky Laing, along with Richie Scarlet on bass, decided to release their first new record since 2002's Mystic Fire to mark their 35th anniversary as a band, thankfully they didn't simply re-record their own classics like "Mississippi Queen" or "Theme for an Imaginary Western." Instead, they pay tribute to Bob Dylan by covering 12 songs from his monumental catalog. While the overall concept is a bit stronger than the execution, guest guitarist Warren Haynes' appearance on "Serve Somebody" and "The Times They Are A-Changin'," and Ozzy Osbourne's anguished reading of "Master's of War" are highlights of Masters of War. © Al Campbell /TiVo
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Rock - Released December 30, 1973 | Cult Legends

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Rock - Released January 30, 2013 | Revolver

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Hard Rock - Released June 28, 2018 | Dream Catcher

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Rock - Released August 24, 2006 | Fuel 2000

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Pop/Rock - Released February 11, 1985 | Legacy Recordings

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Pop - Released January 1, 2002 | LIGHTYEAR (LTY)

Although singer/guitarist Leslie West and drummer Corky Laing, two of the four musicians who were known as Mountain on such hit recordings as 1970's Mountain Climbing!, have released several albums under the band's name since its nominal demise in the 1970s, their legal right to do so is somewhat belied by their inability to fully re-create the group's style. The absence of keyboard player Steve Knight isn't that much of a problem (even though it reduces the sound to that of a power trio with the addition of bass guitar played by different session men or West overdubbing), but Felix Pappalardi, who not only played bass, but also brought his arranging and producing skills to Mountain, is a key omission that cannot be replaced; he was shot to death by his wife, occasional Mountain lyricist Gail Collins, in 1983. West was always the lead vocalist and lead guitar player, so the most identifiable elements of the sound are in place. But without Pappalardi, Mountain is really a West solo project released under a more marketable name. That said, Laing makes his presence felt on Mountain's 2002 reunion effort, Mystic Fire. He is the co-author of several songs, gets drum solos on "Marble Peach/Rotten Peach" and "Johnny Comes Marching Home," and is responsible for the strings on a remake of "Nantucket Sleighride." Still, West dominates the record, his always gruff voice having deteriorated, but his guitar playing still recalling late-'60s/early-'70s peers Eric Clapton, Jimi Hendrix, and Jimmy Page. The songs are often rudimentary compositions that serve as excuses for the guitar excursions; they lack the poetic lyrics formerly contributed by Collins and Pete Brown. So, old fans can welcome back a group that sounds like Mountain, while recognizing that it is not what it once was. © William Ruhlmann /TiVo