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Electronic/Dance - Released June 29, 2009 | Because Music

Moby's most unified and understated album, and all the better for it, Wait for Me is a morose set of elegantly bleary material, quite a shift from the hedonistic club tracks of Last Night. Dominated by instrumentals, "Shot in the Back of the Head" is the most evocative of the bunch, seemingly pulled from an unreleased David Lynch film scored by the Afghan Whigs circa Gentlemen -- a lament from a dustbowl, full of mournful slide guitar and dewy electric piano. Other than "Mistake" -- a glum neo-post-punk rave-up that, despite its cathartic release, remains downcast -- Moby leaves the vocals to a series of women (neighborhood chums, apparently) who each contribute to one song. The smoky 3-a.m. gospel whispers from throwback soul singer Leela James on "Walk with Me" steal the show. ~ Andy Kellman
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Electronic/Dance - Released May 16, 2011 | Little Idiot Because Music

Inspired by the isolation that comes from "being the only person awake (or alive) in an empty city" in the middle of the night, Destroyed is not too much of a departure from Wait for Me, Moby’s previous studio album. Apart from being more electronic-oriented -- there’s significantly less guitar and more prominent throbbing pulse -- the approach and effect are largely the same. Moby shares vocal duties with a handful of women whose performances are spooky and sampled-sounding ("Lie Down in Darkness"), serenely insular ("The Low Hum"), and desperate but resolute ("The Right Thing"). The producer offsets several strings-heavy instrumentals, which range from to the placid "The Broken Places" to the rushing "Sevastopol," with a handful of downcast anthems led by "The Day," where he evokes David Bowie circa Heroes with a little Scary Monsters thrown in for good measure. Latecomers, as well as longtime fans whose favorite Moby material remains the Mimi Goese collaborations on Everything Is Wrong, should have no problem soaking it up. ~ Andy Kellman
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Electronic/Dance - Released March 1, 2017 | Mute, a BMG Company

On Last Night, Moby is as blissfully out of touch with modern club music as he is current. As he explains (of course) in the album's liner notes, he has been in the thick of New York City club culture since the early '80s, and he takes the opportunity here to pay tribute to a number of dance music strains that have fallen in and out of fashion -- in a couple cases, they've recently fallen back into fashion -- including some angles he hasn't taken in well over a decade. The sturdiest, most appealing tracks tend to be where Moby breaks out with some highly energized combination of rollicking pianos, stabbing keyboards, and random divas, mixing and matching rave, Hi-NRG, and disco: "Everyday It's 1989," "Stars," and "Disco Lies" (featuring a vocalist who is nearly a dead ringer for a young Taylor Dayne) would've had no place on any of the last five Moby albums. What is long maligned and what is trendy sometimes occurs simultaneously, as on "I Love to Move in Here" (featuring Grandmaster Caz), a mid-tempo house track that can be sub-categorized as both hip-house (inciting wicked flashbacks for most haters of either component) and Balearic (as it causes that loosey-goosey, anesthetized-but-still-beaming sensation, prevalent in several of the hippest dance tracks released during 2007 and 2008). The poorly timed, not-so-appealing moments -- "257.zero," "Alice" -- with their distant transmission spoken bits and droning raps, might sound in step whenever the Soul Jazz label gets around to releasing rarity compilations with contents resembling Astralwerks' late-'90s compilations for MTV's Amp program. The disc's latter 20 minutes, containing contemplative, string-laden tracks, would be as suited for the Pure Moods series (i.e., beside Yanni, Dave Koz) as past tracks "Porcelain" and "God Moving Over the Face of the Waters." A good number of Moby fans who began to follow the producer's moves well before Play will be inclined to think of Last Night as the best Moby album since Everything Is Wrong. That the album involves several unself-conscious, rush-inducing tracks (rather than the once-expected token track or two) is enough for that opinion to have validity. Ditto the sensible and drastic reduction of Moby's own vocals. ~ Andy Kellman

House - Released April 3, 2017 | Suara

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Electronic/Dance - Released December 2, 2016 | 2DIY4 Music

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House - Released December 1, 2017 | Spinnin' Records

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Drum & Bass - Released May 5, 2017 | Shogun Audio

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Electronic/Dance - Released August 1, 2013 | Mute, a BMG Company

On Last Night, Moby is as blissfully out of touch with modern club music as he is current. As he explains (of course) in the album's liner notes, he has been in the thick of New York City club culture since the early '80s, and he takes the opportunity here to pay tribute to a number of dance music strains that have fallen in and out of fashion -- in a couple cases, they've recently fallen back into fashion -- including some angles he hasn't taken in well over a decade. The sturdiest, most appealing tracks tend to be where Moby breaks out with some highly energized combination of rollicking pianos, stabbing keyboards, and random divas, mixing and matching rave, Hi-NRG, and disco: "Everyday It's 1989," "Stars," and "Disco Lies" (featuring a vocalist who is nearly a dead ringer for a young Taylor Dayne) would've had no place on any of the last five Moby albums. What is long maligned and what is trendy sometimes occurs simultaneously, as on "I Love to Move in Here" (featuring Grandmaster Caz), a mid-tempo house track that can be sub-categorized as both hip-house (inciting wicked flashbacks for most haters of either component) and Balearic (as it causes that loosey-goosey, anesthetized-but-still-beaming sensation, prevalent in several of the hippest dance tracks released during 2007 and 2008). The poorly timed, not-so-appealing moments -- "257.zero," "Alice" -- with their distant transmission spoken bits and droning raps, might sound in step whenever the Soul Jazz label gets around to releasing rarity compilations with contents resembling Astralwerks' late-'90s compilations for MTV's Amp program. The disc's latter 20 minutes, containing contemplative, string-laden tracks, would be as suited for the Pure Moods series (i.e., beside Yanni, Dave Koz) as past tracks "Porcelain" and "God Moving Over the Face of the Waters." A good number of Moby fans who began to follow the producer's moves well before Play will be inclined to think of Last Night as the best Moby album since Everything Is Wrong. That the album involves several unself-conscious, rush-inducing tracks (rather than the once-expected token track or two) is enough for that opinion to have validity. Ditto the sensible and drastic reduction of Moby's own vocals. ~ Andy Kellman
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Electronic/Dance - Released November 3, 2008 | Mute, a BMG Company

$12.99

Electronic/Dance - Released February 7, 1995 | Rhino - Elektra

When Play became a breakout hit in 1999, Elektra readied a basic trainer for listeners new to Moby's practically trademarked style of down-tempo house baroque. Ranging from the Move EP, his major-label debut, to the soundtrack-inspired I Like to Score, Songs 1993-1998 trawls the back catalog to pluck tracks on the same atmospheric level as Play classics like "Porcelain" or "South Side." Many of these tracks -- especially ones from Everything Is Wrong and Animal Rights -- sound much better in this format, divorced from the rock flame-outs that often surrounded them on the original albums. And though the version of his classic "Go" is actually a re-recording from 1998, it's a solid update that retains much of the original but never sounds like a pointless remake. Songs 1993-1998 also spotlights Moby's continuing excellence in a number of genres, including a few of his Hi-NRG house singles from the mid-'90s ("Feeling So Real," "Move"), as well as his frequently beautiful ambient excursions ("God Moving Over the Face of the Waters," "The Rain Falls and the Sky Shudders"). It's a shame that the compilation completely skips his seminal early productions ("Drop a Beat," "Next Is the E") and a few rarities would've been nice for collectors, but Songs 1993-1998 will satisfy fans of Play waiting for a new album. ~ John Bush

Drum & Bass - Released April 18, 2017 | Shogun Audio

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Electronic/Dance - Released August 1, 2013 | Mute, a BMG Company

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Miscellaneous - Released April 28, 2017 | Black Lacquer

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Electronic/Dance - Released February 10, 2017 | Fool's Gold, Inc

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Miscellaneous - Released October 5, 2018 | MOOD

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Miscellaneous - Released April 14, 2017 | Black Lacquer

House - Released December 1, 2017 | Spinnin' Deep

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Alternative & Indie - Released December 25, 2018 | Mute

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Electronic/Dance - Released March 31, 2008 | Mute, a BMG Company

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Electronic/Dance - Released November 18, 2008 | Mute, a BMG Company

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