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Electronic - Released December 24, 2020 | mobyambient

Having been wired up to ambient music since his beginnings (his second album, in 1993, was titled Ambient), Moby is returning to the genre as his career turns 30 years old, taking advantage of the quarantine of spring 2020 to embark on a concept album. For this well-named self-titled album, the American musician set himself three rules. First that all the music had to be improvised and unpublished. Secondly, that he forbade editing the parts that he had already recorded and every part of the process, from recording to mixing to listening, had to be “relaxing”. Because Moby's intention is to cure his fans of the stress of 2020 and offer them an opportunity to escape the ambient anxiety (no bad pun intended). He has more or less succeeded with these ten tracks which average about ten minutes each, carried by a very chill piano and soothing synths, and creating the image of a musician finally at peace, removed from his anti-Trump activism of the last four years, a somewhat chaotic approach that had ended up becoming toxic for him and his music. © Smaël Bouaici/Qobuz
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Electronic - Released June 2, 2008 | Little Idiot

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Electronic - Released June 29, 2009 | Because Music

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Electronic - Released February 26, 2016 | Little Idiot

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Electronic - Released March 31, 2008 | Mute, a BMG Company

On Last Night, Moby is as blissfully out of touch with modern club music as he is current. As he explains (of course) in the album's liner notes, he has been in the thick of New York City club culture since the early '80s, and he takes the opportunity here to pay tribute to a number of dance music strains that have fallen in and out of fashion -- in a couple cases, they've recently fallen back into fashion -- including some angles he hasn't taken in well over a decade. The sturdiest, most appealing tracks tend to be where Moby breaks out with some highly energized combination of rollicking pianos, stabbing keyboards, and random divas, mixing and matching rave, Hi-NRG, and disco: "Everyday It's 1989," "Stars," and "Disco Lies" (featuring a vocalist who is nearly a dead ringer for a young Taylor Dayne) would've had no place on any of the last five Moby albums. What is long maligned and what is trendy sometimes occurs simultaneously, as on "I Love to Move in Here" (featuring Grandmaster Caz), a mid-tempo house track that can be sub-categorized as both hip-house (inciting wicked flashbacks for most haters of either component) and Balearic (as it causes that loosey-goosey, anesthetized-but-still-beaming sensation, prevalent in several of the hippest dance tracks released during 2007 and 2008). The poorly timed, not-so-appealing moments -- "257.zero," "Alice" -- with their distant transmission spoken bits and droning raps, might sound in step whenever the Soul Jazz label gets around to releasing rarity compilations with contents resembling Astralwerks' late-'90s compilations for MTV's Amp program. The disc's latter 20 minutes, containing contemplative, string-laden tracks, would be as suited for the Pure Moods series (i.e., beside Yanni, Dave Koz) as past tracks "Porcelain" and "God Moving Over the Face of the Waters." A good number of Moby fans who began to follow the producer's moves well before Play will be inclined to think of Last Night as the best Moby album since Everything Is Wrong. That the album involves several unself-conscious, rush-inducing tracks (rather than the once-expected token track or two) is enough for that opinion to have validity. Ditto the sensible and drastic reduction of Moby's own vocals. © Andy Kellman /TiVo
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Electronic - Released March 15, 2019 | Little Idiot

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Electronic - Released May 15, 2020 | Mute

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Electronic - Released July 27, 1992 | Little Idiot

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Electronic - Released August 17, 1993 | Little Idiot

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Electronic - Released August 1, 2013 | Mute, a BMG Company

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Pop - Released January 17, 2006 | Atlantic Records - ATG

For some it was the pinnacle of his career, for others one of a continued string of triumphs (others doubtless cared not at all, thinking somehow that synth and dancebeats equalled musical insincerity, but such is life). Regardless of how one takes it, Everything Is Wrong shows Moby at a definite high point, and if some tracks are much more memorable and involved than others, those successes alone justify the attention and hype he received in his earliest days. Even more noteworthy is that for all that the album is a definite product of time and place, namely 1994-1995, it stands up to further listens for all the further changes in dance since. Having already made his mark with tracks like "Go," "Next Is the E," and "Move," on Everything Is Wrong Moby attempted to balance out the creation of an album in a complete, single-unit sense with his knack for immediately catchy singles. On the latter point he succeeds perfectly, with the frenetic, jungle-inspired anthemic diva showcase "Feeling So Real" (punctuated just so with English-inspired MC breaks) and the giddily sweet pop-minded house of "Everytime You Touch Me" utterly irresistible. Hints of future changes crop up with the speed metal-via-Ministry reworking of Move EP's "All That I Need Is to Be Loved," but the similarly minded blues/thrash of "What Love" forecasts the ham-handed slogs of Animal Rights all too well. Meanwhile, the string-touched "God Moving Over the Face of the Waters" is a self-consciously beautiful, cinematic meditation on spiritual power that in lesser hands might be cheese but comes across here as truly affecting. If there's an ace in the hole, it's the inspired recruiting of former Hugo Largo vocalist Mimi Goese, who had spent the early '90s well out of the public eye. Her turns on "Into the Blue" and especially the haunting, evocative album-closer "When It's Cold I'd Like to Die" bring out in the best in both musicians. © Ned Raggett /TiVo
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Electronic - Released September 30, 2013 | Mute

Innocents is in line with Wait for Me (2009) and Destroyed (2011), Moby's most intimate and isolated albums. Following a move from New York to Los Angeles, he recorded almost all the instrumentation by himself. He made a considerable change by seeking vocals from an extended cast of relatively known singers -- including Mark Lanegan, the Flaming Lips' Wayne Coyne, Cold Specks, Skylar Grey, and Damien Jurado -- rather than a handful of locals, and he had Mark "Spike" Stent mix it all. It's another downcast, occasionally grand-sounding set suited for solitary home listening. Not much moves the feet. "A Long Time" has an insistent, kind of dejected chug, while "Saints" sounds like Moby trying to recall how Massive Attack's "Unfinished Sympathy" goes. The emotional apex is "The Perfect Life," a neo-gospel number where Moby and Coyne are backed by a choir of ten voices. It would have provided a suitable end to the album, but instead, it's planted in the middle, surrounded by an ambient piano ballad and surprisingly understated showcase for Grey. Much of the album is rich with Moby's synthetic strings. This is the most liberal he's been with them -- they're just about everywhere -- but he thankfully restrains himself on "The Lonely Night," where Mark Lanegan's deep, weathered voice is relatively (rightfully) unornamented and dissipates amid soft drones after "Here come the lonely night…can't escape my mind." It helps make Innocents Moby's most powerful work in several years. © Andy Kellman /TiVo
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Electronic - Released November 2, 2009 | Little Idiot

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Ambient - Released May 11, 2016 | Little Idiot

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Electronic - Released February 7, 1995 | Rhino - Elektra

When Play became a breakout hit in 1999, Elektra readied a basic trainer for listeners new to Moby's practically trademarked style of down-tempo house baroque. Ranging from the Move EP, his major-label debut, to the soundtrack-inspired I Like to Score, Songs 1993-1998 trawls the back catalog to pluck tracks on the same atmospheric level as Play classics like "Porcelain" or "South Side." Many of these tracks -- especially ones from Everything Is Wrong and Animal Rights -- sound much better in this format, divorced from the rock flame-outs that often surrounded them on the original albums. And though the version of his classic "Go" is actually a re-recording from 1998, it's a solid update that retains much of the original but never sounds like a pointless remake. Songs 1993-1998 also spotlights Moby's continuing excellence in a number of genres, including a few of his Hi-NRG house singles from the mid-'90s ("Feeling So Real," "Move"), as well as his frequently beautiful ambient excursions ("God Moving Over the Face of the Waters," "The Rain Falls and the Sky Shudders"). It's a shame that the compilation completely skips his seminal early productions ("Drop a Beat," "Next Is the E") and a few rarities would've been nice for collectors, but Songs 1993-1998 will satisfy fans of Play waiting for a new album. © John Bush /TiVo
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Dance - Released October 3, 2014 | Daughters of Cain

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Alternative & Indie - Released December 25, 2018 | Mute

Following a pair of angsty punk blasts with the Void Pacific Choir, Moby dipped back into what he does best: soulful electronic soundscapes. If the VPC albums were Moby's outward displays of anger and frustration surrounding the 2016 U.S. presidential election, Everything Was Beautiful, And Nothing Hurt was his depressed and introverted response to the subsequent societal fallout. Despite the overwhelming melancholy that drenches the album, it remains a gorgeous collection that is mostly indebted to trip-hop and his pre-millennial output, with a few nods to the quieter moments on 2013's Innocents. The closest he comes to Play's most propulsive and upbeat moments is on "Like a Motherless Child," which features vocals by Raquel Rodriguez delivered as a rendition of the Southern black spiritual "Sometimes I Feel Like a Motherless Child." Otherwise, EWBANH leans in the direction of Play highlights like "Why Does My Heart Feel So Bad?" ("The Last of Goodbyes"), "My Weakness" ("The Ceremony of Innocence," "Falling Rain and Light"), and "Porcelain" ("The Tired and the Hurt," "Waste of Suns"). Such somber atmospherics reflect a mood and general air of uncertainty, casting a dour shadow over the majority of the album. "Welcome to Hard Times" rides a hypnotic groove, best experienced while enjoying a final drink before the world ends, while "The Sorrow Tree" pulses away, ramping up tension and anxiety. "The Middle Is Gone" -- a forlorn reflection on life and past mistakes -- is utterly hopeless, as Moby laments "I'll never be free/Always plagued by what I'll never be." Yet, beneath it all, there's a sense of warmth that offers a sliver of hope. The sweeping "This Wild Darkness" finds Moby searching for a reason to continue, following "The Middle Is Gone." As he intones over a lush backdrop, supporting vocalists sing "In this darkness/Please light my way." It's a beautiful way to usher out Everything Was Beautiful, And Nothing Hurt, as if Moby is offering a comforting sonic hug. After an album of such confessional, bittersweet sadness, he needs one too. © Neil Z. Yeung /TiVo
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Electronic - Released March 14, 2005 | Little Idiot

Hotel rarely shows, in any shape or form, traceable inspiration from the new wave and post-punk era Moby advertised as being in full effect. More surprising is that apart from the lovely ambient instrumentals that open and close it, the album is all valley and no peaks, suggesting that the shelving of his sampling device was the worst creative move he could've made. The first half contains simple -- as in basic and/or emaciated, so we're talking poor -- modern rock songs that tend to be anthemic and soul-searching in nature. Lead single "Beautiful" is one exception, a tongue-in-cheek thing Moby has imagined being sung by vacant celebrity couples. No matter how affable, vegan, liberal, bespectacled, or vertically challenged he is, the real irony is that a millionaire and former love interest of Natalie Portman has made a song of this kind (see also: Aerosmith's "Eat the Rich"). Beginning "C'mon bay-beh, c'mon girl, c'mon bay-beh, c'mon girl, I love you bay-beigh, I love you now, I love you bay-beigh, I love you now," the heart of the song doesn't say much more, and some of the guitar jerks are a lot closer to Eddie Money's "Shakin'" than anything related to Joy Division. And, speaking of Joy Division, a very gentle version of New Order's "Temptation" is the album's deepest connection to post-punk; it's telling that Moby opted to leave the vocals to Laura Dawn, since he's less a singer than Bernard Sumner. This begins the non-rock portion of the program, which fans of Play and 18 might find easier to enjoy, but it's not much better than what precedes it. For instance, does anybody need to hear him volley obvious bedroom come-ons with Dawn, as he does on "I Like It"? (Because it's about as appealing as a phrase like "Woody Allen nude scene.") Hotel's saving grace is a bonus disc containing an hour's worth of ambient techno that's good enough for separate release. You could name the two discs after Moby's fellow bald artists, which would tell anyone what they need to know before proceeding. Disc one: "Live's Ed Kowalczyk"; disc two: Brian Eno. © Andy Kellman /TiVo
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Electronic - Released March 2, 2018 | Mute

Following a pair of angsty punk blasts with the Void Pacific Choir, Moby dipped back into what he does best: soulful electronic soundscapes. If the VPC albums were Moby's outward displays of anger and frustration surrounding the 2016 U.S. presidential election, Everything Was Beautiful, And Nothing Hurt was his depressed and introverted response to the subsequent societal fallout. Despite the overwhelming melancholy that drenches the album, it remains a gorgeous collection that is mostly indebted to trip-hop and his pre-millennial output, with a few nods to the quieter moments on 2013's Innocents. The closest he comes to Play's most propulsive and upbeat moments is on "Like a Motherless Child," which features vocals by Raquel Rodriguez delivered as a rendition of the Southern black spiritual "Sometimes I Feel Like a Motherless Child." Otherwise, EWBANH leans in the direction of Play highlights like "Why Does My Heart Feel So Bad?" ("The Last of Goodbyes"), "My Weakness" ("The Ceremony of Innocence," "Falling Rain and Light"), and "Porcelain" ("The Tired and the Hurt," "Waste of Suns"). Such somber atmospherics reflect a mood and general air of uncertainty, casting a dour shadow over the majority of the album. "Welcome to Hard Times" rides a hypnotic groove, best experienced while enjoying a final drink before the world ends, while "The Sorrow Tree" pulses away, ramping up tension and anxiety. "The Middle Is Gone" -- a forlorn reflection on life and past mistakes -- is utterly hopeless, as Moby laments "I'll never be free/Always plagued by what I'll never be." Yet, beneath it all, there's a sense of warmth that offers a sliver of hope. The sweeping "This Wild Darkness" finds Moby searching for a reason to continue, following "The Middle Is Gone." As he intones over a lush backdrop, supporting vocalists sing "In this darkness/Please light my way." It's a beautiful way to usher out Everything Was Beautiful, And Nothing Hurt, as if Moby is offering a comforting sonic hug. After an album of such confessional, bittersweet sadness, he needs one too. © Neil Z. Yeung /TiVo
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Electronic - Released November 3, 2008 | Mute, a BMG Company

LAST NIGHT (2008) was Moby’s triumphant return to club music after dabbling in guitar-driven rock and moody instrumentals. The album channeled the decadent spirit of New York’s proto-house and garage, and represented something of a return to Moby’s pre-rave roots as an active participant in the city’s club scene. LAST NIGHT REMIXED brings together electronica’s finest producers for brand new remixes of songs off LAST NIGHT. Featuring energetic mixes from upstarts such as Holy Ghost! and veteran producers General Midi, REMIXED is a lively excursion through cutting edge dance with a nostalgic heart. © TiVo

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