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Jazz - Released January 11, 2019 | Disques Dreyfus

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Michel Petrucciani was an extraordinary being. His size, his constant fight against glass bone disease, his incredible energy to push the limits of what’s possible, his XL talent, his hard work, his true charisma and his humour place him among those who left a deep mark on their time, transcending the borders of jazz... When he died on January 6, 1999, Petrucciani was only 36 years old but he left behind an impressive international career and a status as a national hero. Building on the legacy of Bill Evans, his idol, but also Keith Jarrett, Oscar Peterson and Bud Powell, Petrucciani never failed in paving his own way. With a strong and articulated playing style which leant against a sharp sense of swing and dramatization, he always brought out the melody in his playing. Petrucciani shone when he immersed himself in harmony and arrangements, developing his improvisations on a lyricism that was never too heavy. Twenty years after his death, the pianist from Orange is celebrated once again with a double album featuring 18 personal tracks. A way of reminding us of the gifted composer that he was. Recorded between 1994 and 1997 as solos, duets (with Eddy Louiss, Stéphane Grappelli or Stefano Di Battista), a trio (with Steve Gadd and Anthony Jackson), a trio with a string quartet (with Dave Holland, Tony Williams and the Graffiti Strings Quartet) and a sextet (with Gadd, Jackson, Di Battista, Bob Brookmeyer and Flavio Boltro), the Petrucciani we find on Colors is above all a moving narrator and, in line with the album title, a colourful artist. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz

Jazz - Released January 11, 2019 | SWR Jazzhaus

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Jazz - Released February 1, 2017 | Dreyfus Jazz

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Jazz - Released September 22, 1999 | Dreyfus Jazz

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Jazz - Released July 30, 2012 | Dreyfus Jazz

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Jazz - Released January 1, 1989 | Blue Note Records

Music was a slight departure from pianist Michel Petrucciani's usual Bill Evans-influenced recordings of the period. Petrucciani uses synthesizers (his and Adam Holzman's) on all but two selections, but these are very much in the background, making the ensembles sound a little larger than they actually are. Petrucciani's ten originals range from romantic ("Memories of Paris") and manic ("My Bebop Tune") to charming ("Lullaby") and funky ("Play Me") with a generous supply of Latin-tinged pieces and one rhythmic vocal by Tania Maria; Joe Lovano (on soprano) and the accordion of Gil Goldstein make one appearance apiece. Worth investigating. ~ Scott Yanow
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Jazz - Released July 30, 2012 | Dreyfus Jazz

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Jazz - Released July 30, 2012 | Dreyfus Jazz

Solo Live, released shortly after his death, marks pianist Michel Petrucciani's lasting solo gift to the jazz world. Though clearly a virtuoso on his instrument, his playing always seemed to reflect as much respect for the audience as it did for his own talent. At its essence, Petrucciani's music is remarkably buoyant, decidedly joyful, improvisationally aggressive, and, above all, intended to evoke an emotional response on the part of the listener. His amazing reading of Ellington's "Caravan" is characteristic of this unique style. However, the pianist may best be remembered for his original compositions and three of his most memorable are included here. "Looking Up," as the title would suggest, is overtly optimistic and inherently hopeful. "Home" is a clearly enunciated statement of warmth and comfort. "Brazilian Like" is orchestral and melodic to the point at which the tune remains in one's head long after its conclusion. Petrucciani closes the album with the medley of "She Did It Again/Take the A Train/She Did It Again" -- his original sandwiched around Strayhorn's classic. A befitting set-closer for this extraordinary musician. ~ Brian Bartolini
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Jazz - Released October 15, 1997 | Dreyfus Jazz

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Jazz - Released July 21, 2008 | Dreyfus Jazz

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Jazz - Released January 11, 2019 | Disques Dreyfus

Michel Petrucciani was an extraordinary being. His size, his constant fight against glass bone disease, his incredible energy to push the limits of what’s possible, his XL talent, his hard work, his true charisma and his humour place him among those who left a deep mark on their time, transcending the borders of jazz... When he died on January 6, 1999, Petrucciani was only 36 years old but he left behind an impressive international career and a status as a national hero. Building on the legacy of Bill Evans, his idol, but also Keith Jarrett, Oscar Peterson and Bud Powell, Petrucciani never failed in paving his own way. With a strong and articulated playing style which leant against a sharp sense of swing and dramatization, he always brought out the melody in his playing. Petrucciani shone when he immersed himself in harmony and arrangements, developing his improvisations on a lyricism that was never too heavy. Twenty years after his death, the pianist from Orange is celebrated once again with a double album featuring 18 personal tracks. A way of reminding us of the gifted composer that he was. Recorded between 1994 and 1997 as solos, duets (with Eddy Louiss, Stéphane Grappelli or Stefano Di Battista), a trio (with Steve Gadd and Anthony Jackson), a trio with a string quartet (with Dave Holland, Tony Williams and the Graffiti Strings Quartet) and a sextet (with Gadd, Jackson, Di Battista, Bob Brookmeyer and Flavio Boltro), the Petrucciani we find on Colors is above all a moving narrator and, in line with the album title, a colourful artist. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1998 | Blue Note Records

Tackling his own material, with nary a vintage standard within earshot, Petrucciani combines his assertive, driving, mainstream piano with two different trios on two separate occasions. The first half of the program features the hard-swinging combination of bassist Gary Peacock and drummer Roy Haynes, augmented on "One For Us" by the slightly withdrawn guitar of John Abercrombie. The second half finds bassist Eddie Gomez and drummer Al Foster providing somewhat smoother, perhaps more conventional support, occasionally with a Latin twinge, and Abercrombie and percussionist Steve Thornton sit in on one number apiece. Petrucciani's compositions are certainly worthy pieces, but as always, the pianist's direct, intelligently probing solos leave the source material way behind; he's an improviser through and through. ~ Richard S. Ginell
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1986 | Blue Note Records

After five years during which he emerged from France to become an important figure in the international jazz world, pianist Michel Petrucciani (still a few days shy of his 23rd birthday) debuted on Blue Note with this superior trio outing. Assisted by bassist Palle Danielsson and drummer Eliot Zigmund, Petrucciani sometimes shows off the influence of Bill Evans both in the nearly equal roles played by the instruments and in his chord voicings. However, the pianist's own personality does shine through often on the set, which features explorations of four of Petrucciani's tunes, "Night and Day," and "Here's That Rainy Day." Superior post-bop music played by the already brilliant pianist. ~ Scott Yanow

Jazz - Released September 1, 2014 | Ird Digital Distribution

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Jazz - Released February 1, 2017 | Dreyfus Jazz

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Jazz - Released January 1, 1993 | Blue Note Records

In an interview, Michel Petrucciani said "...my biggest inspiration is Duke Ellington, because in my very early age he gave [me] the inspiration to play the piano." For Promenade with Duke Petrucciani not only honors music Ellington composed, but music with which he was associated. There are some Billy Strayhorn pieces and other songs where Ellington's compositional contributions are arguably marginal. That the album offers an adventure in harmony is predicted by the first cut, "Caravan." Stretching over seven minutes in length, it explores, in-depth, virtually every nuance of this 1936 hit which Ellington wrote with trombonist Juan Tizol. Bold approaches to harmonies notwithstanding, Petrucciani does not desert his basic let-it-all-hang-out romanticism which he celebrates on "Lush Life." He emphasizes feelings of sentimentality in his rendition of "In a Sentimental Mood." His interpretation is brooding and introspective, but every now and then some bright chords hold out the hope that the somber climate may be passing. Petrucciani is a master at clarifying the mood he is trying to create with his piano. Not all the music on the album is familiar Ellington, as shown in the presence of two rarely performed pieces, "Hidden Joy" and "One Night in the Hotel." It is on the well-known "Take the 'A' Train," however, that Petrucciani expresses best the joy he experiences with Ellington's music and the influence it has had on him. His is a rousing, twisting rendition of the Duke's signature tune. Promenade with Duke is one of the more innovative and stimulating sets of solo piano performances of Ellington's music on disc. ~ Dave Nathan
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Jazz - Released February 1, 2017 | Dreyfus Jazz

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Jazz - Released July 1, 1996 | Dreyfus Jazz

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Jazz - Released January 1, 2002 | Blue Note Records

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Jazz - Released January 1, 1994 | Blue Note Records