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Classical - Released January 1, 1997 | Archiv Produktion

Distinctions Diapason d'or du siècle - Diapason d'or de l'année - Diapason d'or - The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Classical - Released January 1, 2005 | Archiv Produktion

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Classical - Released January 1, 2001 | Deutsche Grammophon (DG)

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Classical - Released January 1, 1996 | Archiv Produktion

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Classical - Released January 1, 2004 | Archiv Produktion

Booklet
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Classical - Released January 1, 1998 | Archiv Produktion

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Classical - Released January 1, 2006 | Archiv Produktion

Tension -- it's a wonderful thing. The tension between great pitching and great hitting is what keeps baseball interesting. The tension between will she or won't she is what keeps dating fascinating. And, of course, the tension between centrifugal force and gravitational force is what keeps the whole universe spinning. But as an interpretive point of view for Mozart's symphonies No. 40 and No. 41, tension is of doubtful value. Yet tension is pretty much all conductor Marc Minkowski has on his mind in these 2006 recordings with his Les Musiciens du Louvre. He pushes already too quick tempos forward to underline a point -- and his players seem not altogether willing to go with him. He pulls already too slow tempos back to round off a phrase -- and once again his players are not altogether willing to go with him. He drives the strings too hard -- and the players go out of tune. He forces the winds too often -- and the players go out of sync. Compared to either the overly refined Herbert von Karajan/Berlin Philharmonic performances or the acutely etiolated Christopher Hogwood/Academy of Ancient Music performances, Minkowski and Les Musiciens' performances may seem revelatory. Compared with the controlled passion of the Bruno Walter/New York Philharmonic performances or the commanding power of the Karl Böhm/Vienna Philharmonic performances, Minkowski and Les Musiciens sound merely too tense. Archiv's standard clean and close sound is oddly gray and strangely distant. © TiVo
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Classical - Released January 1, 2003 | Archiv Produktion

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Classical - Released January 1, 2002 | Archiv Produktion

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Classical - Released January 1, 1995 | Archiv Produktion

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Classical - Released January 1, 1999 | Archiv Produktion

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Classical - Released January 1, 1998 | Archiv Produktion

Jean-Joseph Cassanéa de Mondonville, violinist of the royal chapel and just a bit younger than Rameau, is one of those French composers of the late Baroque generally relegated to the summary paragraph in historical surveys. His music is not terribly common on recordings, and the Brilliant label's resurrection of this late-'90s recording on Archiv, despite dreadful sound, is welcome. These little "sonates en symphonies" are interesting in several respects. The name comes from the fact that Mondonville made orchestral versions, some years after the fact, of a set of keyboard-and-violin sonatas published as his Op. 3 in the early 1730s (the orchestral versions come from 1748 or 1749). He did this unusual sort of arrangement quite skillfully, with novel ways, for the time in France, of incorporating wind instruments into the texture. Despite the fact that Mondonville would soon be charged by the king's mistress, Madame de Pompadour, with the task of defending French music in the notorious Querelle des Bouffons, these three-movement sonatas, mostly in the fast-slow-fast pattern, are Italian to the core. The only exception comes in the middle movements, all of which except the last bear the adjective "gratioso." These are full of Parisian charm, and the one from the Sonate No. 5 (track 14), with its strings rapidly dancing in the background of a calm tune, is unique. The outer movements are all well-wrought, often feinting alternately in the directions of counterpoint and fetching melody. The historical-instrument group Les Musiciens du Louvre (based in Grenoble, despite the name), even without the favorable sonic environment they would later enjoy at the Naïve label, show themselves perfectly attuned to the sensuous and colorful imagination of the music. Recommended even for casual Baroque fans, at least for play on midprice equipment or worse, and orchestral conductors of whatever stripe should also get to know these works; as curtain-raisers, any one of them would put an audience in a good mood. Booklet notes are in English only. © TiVo
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Classical - Released April 1, 1992 | Warner Classics International

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Classical - Released January 1, 1998 | Archiv Produktion

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Classical - Released January 1, 2005 | Archiv Produktion

French Baroque composer Jean-Philippe Rameau left behind an extraordinary wealth of orchestral music, but little to none of it is of the stand-alone variety, scattered as it is throughout his 18 operas and 13 ballets left to posterity, in whole or in part. Conductor Marc Minkowski has elected to redress the imbalance by compiling 17 of Rameau's best orchestral moments into Une Symphonie Imaginaire, an "imaginary symphony" performed by period instrument ensemble Les Musiciens du Louvre and issued on compact discs by Archiv Produktion. This type of montage of related bits and pieces from various scores morphed, if you will, into a single work is a time-honored tradition, particularly as it relates to Baroque music; for example, Sir John Barbirolli's Suite for wind & strings arranged from bits and pieces of Henry Purcell or Sir Hamilton Harty's arrangements from Handel. Yet Une Symphonie Imaginaire is a world away from the Baroque boom of the 1930s. The sequence of pieces here, drawn from the operas Zaïs, Les Fêtes d'Hébe, Dardanus, Le Temple de la Gloire, Les Boréades, and Hippolyte & Aricie; the ballets La Naissance d'Osiris and Platée; and a contemporary arrangement of the Rameau's keyboard piece La Poule, is mainly intended for this album and not for use in concert. Minkowski does not attempt to assert that his "symphony" drawn from Rameau's music is anything that the composer himself may have devised -- in Rameau's time, the symphony itself was a mere baby, little more than a fancy name for an opera overture. Much of Rameau's music is eccentric and utilizes revolutionary techniques for this era, particularly in fracturing individual lines within the orchestra in order to provide a fragmented, disjunctive quality to the texture. The "Prelude to Act V" of Les Boréades sounds almost like a Baroque overture as reorganized by John Cage. The anonymous arrangement of La Poule is an outstanding character piece and quite unusual for any orchestral music of the mid-eighteenth century. Overall, Une Symphonie Imaginaire is splendidly well played and sequenced in a fast-moving order, although music-by-the-yard fanatics may find the 56-minute running time too stingy. This Hybrid CD version is to be preferred over the standard CD release, as the latter suffers from an intermittent high end, whereas the Hybrid CD accurately represents this superb Archiv recording for what it is with no dropouts or other sonic anomalies. © TiVo
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Classical - Released January 1, 1996 | Archiv Produktion

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Classical - Released January 1, 2001 | Archiv Produktion

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Classical - Released January 1, 2006 | Archiv Produktion

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Classical - Released January 9, 2021 | UMG Recordings, Inc.