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Rock - Released September 13, 2019 | Roadrunner Records

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With 25 years of experience and 12 albums under their belt since the release of the eponymous Korn in 1994, what can we expect from the famous band from Bakersfield in 2019? Rightly considered as pioneers of neo-Metal, Korn has experienced many ups and downs. Following a decade at the top of the charts, when their iconic guitarist Brian “Head” Welch left the group it became more experimental, dabbling in pop and dubstep (like The Path of Totality) which left many fans feeling a little bewildered. But Head’s return in 2013 undoubtedly gave the band a new lease of life as they returned to their more conventional style of music. And if the two albums that followed were a sign that they had returned to their high standards, The Nothing goes one step further. From the very first note of the bagpipes in The End Begins, it’s clear that Korn is well and truly back in the game. The album is dedicated to tradition as all the group’s characteristics can be heard throughout the album, (the scat in Cold that is reminiscent of Twist, the sound of the guitar in The Darkness is Revealing, the chorus of “disco” drums in Idiosyncrasy and so on). But The Nothing itself is not immune from trying new things and includes the track Finally Free which has hints of trip-hop as well as the particularly manic H@rd3r, which is a something a bit different altogether. And even if the band hasn’t reinvented itself in this particular album, their knack for riffs and catchy choruses, the manic performances by Jonathan Davis (and the very talented Ray Luzier on drums), combined with a solid production team and just the right amount of experimentation makes The Nothing the go-to album for this ‘third-generation’ Korn. There’s no doubt about it, Korn is still on top form! © Théo Roumier/Qobuz
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Rock - Released October 21, 2016 | Roadrunner Records

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Dance - Released November 30, 2011 | Roadrunner Records

Korn remembered who they were just in time to forget it all again on The Path of Totality, an unexpected left turn into dubstep and all manner of dark electronica from the kings of nu metal. Unexpected this move may be, but not unnatural. Korn always emphasized texture over riffs, so shifting from a gray guitar grind toward claustrophobic electronic collage doesn’t induce shock, apart from the shock that the album actually works. Korn’s cast of collaborators -- notably the Grammy-nominated Skrillex, but also Noisia, Excision, Feed Me, and 12th Planet -- does not redefine the band’s character but rather reinterpret it, retaining the same tempos, the same creeping minor-key melodies and riffs, the same sense of enveloping angst that have been present since their 1994 debut. The difference of arrangement -- heavy on skittish drums and electro walls of assault -- has the curious effect of making Korn seem not adventurous but rather mature: the content of Jonathan Davis’ rants matter less than his tone, and the producers have folded his vocals, along with Munky’s buzzing guitar, into a web that feels like Korn even if it doesn’t strictly sound like any other Korn album, not even the industrial-funk of See You on the Other Side. Despite all the electronics, there’s no mistaking The Path of Totality as a Korn album...and one of their better ones to boot. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Rock - Released October 21, 2016 | Roadrunner Records

Surviving a shaky decade that produced a couple decent albums and few identity crises, Korn bring it back to basics on their 12th full-length, The Serenity of Suffering. It's both a reminder that Korn are the masters of this particular universe and also fiercely dedicated to its fans. Inasmuch as the Korn faithful are capable of fuzzy feelings, Serenity delivers goose bumps for those who have stuck with the band since the '90s. Diehards will notice that Jonathan Davis and the gang have brought things back to the Issues/Untouchables era -- especially on "Take Me" and "Everything Falls Apart" -- when Korn perfected the combination of nu-metal brutality, desperate vulnerability, and spook show creepiness (in fact, the Issues doll -- now wrapped in stitched-up skin with exposed ribs -- makes a prominent appearance on Serenity's album art). Without pandering to career-peak nostalgia, Korn deftly execute all the hallmarks that have come to define their sound. Davis' vocals are the best they've been in years, bringing back his feverish scatting on the apocalyptic "Rotting in Vain" and unleashing intensely visceral bellows on the bloodletting "The Hating" (his bagpipes, however, are unfortunately absent). Head and Munky's renewed guitar partnership also has its groove back, amplifying the disturbing atmospherics with unnerving effects and familiar riffs. Underneath it all, Fieldy, Ray Luzier and DJ C-Minus maintain that propulsive and elastic whiplash assault, like on the scratched-up "Next in Line" and "Black Is the Soul," which lurches through a minefield of percussion and dissonance. Corey Taylor (Slipknot, Stone Sour) makes a marquee cameo on "A Different World," providing a brutal hardcore foil to Davis' damaged wail. Adding Taylor's fury over Korn's bludgeoning backdrop is as dangerous and unhinged as genre fans could imagine. Produced by Nick Raskulinecz (Marilyn Manson, Deftones, Evanescence), The Serenity of Suffering is a welcome return to a time when Korn were at the top of their game. It's one of their best albums, almost heart-warming in its cathartic familiarity. ~ Neil Z. Yeung
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Rock - Released June 26, 2019 | Roadrunner Records

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Dance - Released November 21, 2011 | Roadrunner Records

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Rock - Released August 2, 2019 | Roadrunner Records

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Rock - Released July 9, 2010 | Roadrunner Records

Taking a cue from the Van Halen playbook, the III in the title of Korn III: Remember Who You Are isn’t a numbering device, it signifies an opening of another phase in Korn’s career. Somehow, the band has bypassed a Korn II altogether in their discography, but it’s commonly acknowledged that the tail-end of the 2000s found the group floundering a bit, going so far as to flirt with the Matrix in an attempt to figure out which direction to go now that they’ve hit middle age. This is where the subtitle comes in: the group has certainly remembered who they are, ditching all the affectations that crippled their muddled 2007 eponymous album and rediscovering their voice. They’ve gone back to the coiled, furious sputter of their debut, but there’s no disguising that Korn is an older band, substituting precision for frenzy without diluting their power. That’s a crucial difference: they’re not desperately attempting to re-create their youth, they’re reconnecting with their passions and re-interpreting them from the perspective as veterans. Sometimes they stumble -- in many ways, Jonathan Davis has the trickiest problem by putting actual words to their emotions -- but as sheer galvanizing force, Korn III delivers due to that combination of raw aggression and musical finesse. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Rock - Released July 9, 2010 | Roadrunner Records

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Rock - Released September 6, 2019 | Roadrunner Records

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Metal - Released July 12, 2010 | Roadrunner Records

Taking a cue from the Van Halen playbook, the III in the title of Korn III: Remember Who You Are isn’t a numbering device, it signifies an opening of another phase in Korn’s career. Somehow, the band has bypassed a Korn II altogether in their discography, but it’s commonly acknowledged that the tail-end of the 2000s found the group floundering a bit, going so far as to flirt with the Matrix in an attempt to figure out which direction to go now that they’ve hit middle age. This is where the subtitle comes in: the group has certainly remembered who they are, ditching all the affectations that crippled their muddled 2007 eponymous album and rediscovering their voice. They’ve gone back to the coiled, furious sputter of their debut, but there’s no disguising that Korn is an older band, substituting precision for frenzy without diluting their power. That’s a crucial difference: they’re not desperately attempting to re-create their youth, they’re reconnecting with their passions and re-interpreting them from the perspective as veterans. Sometimes they stumble -- in many ways, Jonathan Davis has the trickiest problem by putting actual words to their emotions -- but as sheer galvanizing force, Korn III delivers due to that combination of raw aggression and musical finesse. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Metal - Released December 5, 2011 | Roadrunner Records

Korn remembered who they were just in time to forget it all again on The Path of Totality, an unexpected left turn into dubstep and all manner of dark electronica from the kings of nu metal. Unexpected this move may be, but not unnatural. Korn always emphasized texture over riffs, so shifting from a gray guitar grind toward claustrophobic electronic collage doesn’t induce shock, apart from the shock that the album actually works. Korn’s cast of collaborators -- notably the Grammy-nominated Skrillex, but also Noisia, Excision, Feed Me, and 12th Planet -- does not redefine the band’s character but rather reinterpret it, retaining the same tempos, the same creeping minor-key melodies and riffs, the same sense of enveloping angst that have been present since their 1994 debut. The difference of arrangement -- heavy on skittish drums and electro walls of assault -- has the curious effect of making Korn seem not adventurous but rather mature: the content of Jonathan Davis’ rants matter less than his tone, and the producers have folded his vocals, along with Munky’s buzzing guitar, into a web that feels like Korn even if it doesn’t strictly sound like any other Korn album, not even the industrial-funk of See You on the Other Side. Despite all the electronics, there’s no mistaking The Path of Totality as a Korn album...and one of their better ones to boot. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Metal - Released October 21, 2016 | Roadrunner Records

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Rock - Released February 20, 2012 | Roadrunner Records

Metal - Released September 30, 2016 | Roadrunner Records

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Rock - Released October 12, 2016 | Roadrunner Records

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Rock - Released May 24, 2010 | Roadrunner Records

Metal - Released May 25, 2010 | Roadrunner Records

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Rock - Released July 22, 2016 | Roadrunner Records

Metal - Released August 22, 2016 | Roadrunner Records

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Korn in the magazine
  • Korn: chapter 13
    Korn: chapter 13 With "The Nothing", the kings of nu-metal are back with an album which remains true to the band's beginnings.