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Alternative & Indie - Released April 26, 2019 | ATO RECORDS

After taking a break from releasing new albums for over a year, the always entertaining, often brilliant King Gizzard & the Lizard Wizard returned in 2019 with Fishing for Fishies, a blues-inspired recording that is their most accessible album since 2015's Paper Mâché Dream Balloon and a continuation of their deliriously warped exploration of the sonic cosmos. They've shelved the microtonal instruments, shut down the synths (for the most part), and dialed down their ambitions in favor of laid-back, rambling tunes that feature pianos, gentle vocals, acoustic instruments, and lots of both blues and fancy harp. It's not exactly a step back from the epic albums they had been cranking out, but it seems like they were ready to do something a little more relaxed and mellow. Being who they are, though, it never gets snoozy and their version of rambling boogie is still plenty odd. "Boogieman Sam" is the most normal-sounding track on the record with its choogling groove and singsong vocals; it also features harp glissandos, strange vocal effects, and a long and wobbly guitar break. Here, and throughout, they sound like a jam band that was shot into space and came back to earth with alien DNA. "Plastic Boogie" is another weird one that starts out calm enough but goes spinning off the rails frantically by the end, "Fishing for Fishies" is super hooky back-porch folk with falsetto vocals, vocoder, and typically left-field lyrics, and "The Cruel Millennial" is a wicked blast of funky AOR built around double bass, bongos, fiery guitar wrangling, and tough vocals from the record's MVP, harmonica player Ambrose Kenny-Smith. This being King Gizzard, they do take some fun detours like "The Bird Song," a sweetly catchy slice of piano pop, and "Real's Not Real," a baroque-meets-boogie song that shows just how brilliant the band are at fusing styles to make something new and unusual. They really take this trick to extremes on the record's final two songs. "Acarine" is built on a rolling boogie rhythm and features Kenny-Smith wailing on harp, but it keeps adding spacy synths and sequences until the song ends up sounding like HAL taking a crack at the blues, then segueing into a shimmering disco groove. It really shouldn't work at all, but somehow the band find a way for it to make sense. The vocoder-sung, key-filled "Cyboogie" almost sounds reasonable in context, even though the idea of synth-prog set to a boogie beat is patently bonkers. Again, the band make it seem like the most natural thing in the world. Once again, King Gizzard deliver a record that lives up to their high standard even though it (mostly) is free from ambition and drama. Now that they've added the blues to their long list of styles (garage, metal, folk, psych, jazz, and prog) that they've warped and remade in Gizzard fashion, what's next? ~ Tim Sendra
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Alternative & Indie - Released March 28, 2019 | ATO RECORDS

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Pop/Rock - Released September 7, 2012 | Flightless - Gaga Digi

King Gizzard & the Lizard Wizard's first album, 12 Bar Bruise, is a pummeling rock & roll record that builds on the promise of their first couple of releases and blasts their expansive garage rock sound straight into orbit. The album barely lets up from start to finish, with the tempos set right around top speed and the guitars set to destruction. It's one ripping rocker after another, with vocalist Stu Mackenzie's vocals seemingly fed through a paper shredder and the rest of the band flailing like mad to keep up. Picking highlights is like picking a favorite child; they are all equally strong and violent, and able to knock down the garage walls and take over the neighborhood, if not the world. Apart from one song, a spoken word piece by author Broderick Smith, the album comes across like flickering scenes from a wild frat party, one where inhibitions are tossed out the window and things happen that are best forgotten the next day. It's a loose and frantically fun album that doesn't have time for niceties like fidelity, but doesn't skimp on hooks either. When making records this party-centric and wild, bands too often forget it's the tunes that keep people coming back for more. Because King Gizzard included plenty of great tunes on 12 Bar Bruise, the record stands up to repeated listenings -- even if the studio where it was hatched probably collapsed after the last note was captured. Though it may not sound exactly as pure as some garage rock revivalists may like, 12 Bar Bruise perfectly captures the glorious sense of abandon and freedom of the best garage songs, positioning King Gizzard as a rock & roll force to be reckoned with. ~ Tim Sendra
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Alternative & Indie - Released February 24, 2017 | ATO RECORDS

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Alternative & Indie - Released April 29, 2016 | ATO Records (AT0)

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Alternative & Indie - Released November 13, 2015 | ATO Records (AT0)

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Alternative & Indie - Released November 21, 2017 | ATO RECORDS

Like the rest of their albums released in 2017, King Gizzard & the Lizard Wizard's fourth album of the year has a gimmick. This time it's not musical, though. The stunt here is that it's the world's first public domain album, given away free by the band and legal to sell by anyone who feels like pressing it up. After an album made with microtonal instruments, a synth prog epic, and a trip-hop jazz collaboration with Mild High Club, Polygondwanaland sounds like a consolidation of everything the band has done up until now, chewed up and spit back put in large and small chunks of psychedelic rock. The first song alone, the ten-minute-long "Crumbling Castle," employs microtonal guitars, layers in synths, sounds like space prog, has laid back jazz interludes and heavy metal breakdowns, and delivers all the trippy punch of their early work. After all the experiments and tricks, it almost sounds like the band is playing it safe, even if the song is a rampaging ball of barely controlled energy. They really aren't, though. Instead, they are delivering a record that plays to their strengths as songwriters and musicians instead of distracting people with some flashy idea. It's straight -- or as straight as possible -- King Gizzard, and at this stage of their career, that's a welcome development. Hearing them incorporate all the different sonic flourishes they've employed in the past in pursuit of good songs and not some higher concept means the album may slip past unnoticed, but it will sound great to anyone not scared off by the lack of theatrics. Tracks like the spookily restrained "Searching," the rampaging "The Fourth Colour," the tribal "The Castle in the Air," or the thrumming title track are the work of a band in full command of their process and results. Their fourth album of 2017 may not be their most exciting of the year, but it is their strongest and shows that King Gizzard don't need any bells and whistles to make a great psychedelic splash. ~ Tim Sendra
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Alternative & Indie - Released June 23, 2017 | ATO RECORDS

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Alternative & Indie - Released August 18, 2017 | ATO RECORDS

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Alternative & Indie - Released December 31, 2017 | ATO RECORDS

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Alternative & Indie - Released February 1, 2019 | ATO RECORDS

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Metal - Released April 14, 2019 | ATO RECORDS

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Alternative & Indie - Released March 12, 2019 | ATO RECORDS

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Alternative & Indie - Released June 23, 2017 | ATO RECORDS

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Alternative & Indie - Released June 23, 2017 | ATO RECORDS

$7.49

Alternative & Indie - Released June 23, 2017 | ATO RECORDS