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Country - Released September 21, 2018 | CMCapNash (N91)

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Country - Released January 1, 2014 | Capitol Nashville

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Country - Released January 1, 1978 | Capitol Nashville

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Country - Released January 1, 2008 | EMI Gold

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Ambient/New Age - Released September 21, 2018 | CMCapNash (N91)

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Recorded at his commercial peak, Rogers' Christmas features both contemporary material ("Kentucky Homemade," "Kids") and more traditional fare ("White Christmas," "O Holy Night"); while recommended for fans, casual listeners are advised to seek out other country holiday LPs instead. ~ Jason Ankeny
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Pop - Released November 2, 2018 | Suite 102

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Pop - Released November 22, 1991 | Warner Records - Nashville

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Country - Released January 1, 2012 | Capitol Nashville

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Country - Released October 8, 2013 | Warner Records

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A big-budget Kenny Rogers album is a rare thing in the new millennium. Live albums, Christian records, Cracker Barrel exclusives, and seasonal specials piled up with regularity, but only 2006's Water & Bridges -- a reflective country album released on Capitol Nashville -- qualified as an album with real chart aspirations and 2013's You Can’t Make Old Friends acts as its unofficial sequel, a heavily produced, heavily promoted record designed not to woo back country fans but his crossover audience. To that end, the centerpiece arrives first thing: a sticky, sentimental duet with Dolly Parton on "You Can't Make Old Friends," a song that hazily suggests fond memories of when they sang together on their 30-year-old hit "Islands in the Stream." This album isn't as powerfully melodic as the Bee Gees-written 1983 masterpiece Eyes That See in the Dark but it's surely in the same adult contemporary vein, emphasizing soft surfaces and sweet melodies. There are hints of roots music, arriving either in the incongruous Buckwheat Zydeco cameo on "Don't Leave Me in the Night Time" or the sung Spanish chorus on "Dreams of the San Joaquin," plus there's an undercurrent of red-state conservatism to some songs, culminating in the ersatz blues of "'Merica." These add layers to You Can't Make Old Friends but Kenny feels more comfortable when he's cruising down the middle of the road, singing songs that are as appealing for their feel as their form. Maybe the individual songs aren't so memorable but the overall experience is one smooth ride. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Country - Released October 7, 2016 | Warner Records

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Country - Released January 1, 1996 | Hip-O (UC)

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Country - Released November 2, 2018 | Madacy Special Products

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Pop - Released November 2, 2018 | Madacy Special Products

These 20 Kenny Rogers tracks provide only adequate representation of the singer's greatest hits. Unfortunately, these are re-recorded versions that should be avoided. If you're looking for the original chart-toppers like "She Believes in Me," "Through the Years," and "You Decorated My Life," your best bet is 20 Greatest Hits on EMI America. ~ Al Campbell
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Country - Released August 30, 1983 | EMI Music Nashville (ERN)

This is a masterpiece of a pop recording from Kenny Rogers. It is clear that Barry Gibb, Maurice Gibb, and co-producers Karl Richardson and Albhy Galuten remembered Rogers' pop roots with the First Edition and, despite the country twang of "Buried Treasure," the slick musicianship and modulation are not your typical country & western. There are four tracks written by Barry and Maurice and five more by Barry, Maurice, and brother Robin Gibb, including the stunning number one hit from September 1983, "Islands in the Stream." It hit number one across the board on adult contemporary, country, and the Top 40, and deservedly so -- the melody is infectious, impeccable, and perfectly recorded. Keep in mind this was five years after they created Frankie Valli's biggest-selling solo record, "Grease" -- the pairing of Dolly Parton with Rogers makes for an amazing vocal sound to carry the melody. "Living With You" features the Bee Gees -- it is Rogers fronting the Bee Gees, and why they didn't seek out more artists, new as well as established, to work their magic on is a pity. It's a lush setting for the country superstar, and as Barbara Streisand and Dionne Warwick enjoyed success thanks to this creative team, Eyes That See in the Dark stands as an important piece of the Rogers catalog and a really timeless recording. The Gatlin Brothers add their magic to "Evening Star" and "Buried Treasure," and these elements bring the Barry Gibb/Richardson/Galuten thousand-tracks production down to earth. "Evening Star" doesn't have the complexities of Samantha Sang's "Emotion," the producers being very careful to keep it simple, something they just weren't doing on all their other records. There are only ten tracks on Eyes That See in the Dark, Jimmie Haskell's strings the major instrument next to Rogers' sympathetic vocal performance. "Midsummer Nights" is co-authored by Barry Gibb and Galuten, making Barry the catalyst and driving force, as he is the only person with a hand in every tune. "Midsummer Nights" brings things back up after "Hold Me," and it is more adult contemporary than country. It would have made a great single but, as it was, the opening track, "This Woman," went Top 25 in early 1984, and by the end of that year Rogers would post his 27th Top 40 hit, ending a string started 16 years earlier in 1968. It isn't clear why they didn't, but the pretty Barry and Maurice Gibb tune "I Will Always Love You" (not to be confused with Parton's hit of the same name) and the title track certainly should have found some chart action as well. Eyes That See in the Dark is not the definitive Kenny Rogers album but, outside of greatest-hits packages, it is absolutely one of his most consistent and one of his best. ~ Joe Viglione
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Ambient/New Age - Released September 21, 2018 | CMCapNash (N91)

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Recorded at his commercial peak, Rogers' Christmas features both contemporary material ("Kentucky Homemade," "Kids") and more traditional fare ("White Christmas," "O Holy Night"); while recommended for fans, casual listeners are advised to seek out other country holiday LPs instead. ~ Jason Ankeny
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Country - Released January 1, 1993 | Capitol Nashville

This European Kenny Rogers compilation boasts almost all of the legendary country-pop singer's biggest hits including the "Gambler," "She Believes in Me," "Coward of the County," "We've Got Tonight," and "Lucille." Daytime Friends: The Very Best of Kenny Rogers is more or less on par with other "greatest-hits" compilations, though "Ruby," "Reuben James," and "Something's Burning" are re-recordings of the versions he did with the First Edition, and his duet with Dolly Parton, "Islands in the Stream," is nowhere to be found. ~ James Christopher Monger
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Country - Released January 1, 2014 | Capitol Nashville

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Country - Released April 28, 1989 | Warner Records - Nashville

Adult-contemporary, inspirational music, with guest Gladys Knight. ~ Bil Carpenter
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Country - Released December 2, 1983 | EMI Music Nashville (ERN)

When Kenny Rogers paired up with Scottish pop songstress Sheena Easton for "We've Got Tonight," the hit title track from this 1983 album, one could quibble about Easton's occasionally overwrought and bombastic performance, but there are a few moments of truly sublime vocal interplay. The album provides a little of Rogers' trademark storytelling with "Scarlet," and quite a bit of soaring balladry as heard on "All My Life," both of which were hits. You will be forgiven for thinking the album sounds a bit like Lionel Richie in places, since Richie contributes the song "How Long." Rogers ends the album with "You Are So Beautiful," a loving tribute to his legions of female fans, but male listeners may want to cut out early. ~ Greg Adams
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Country - Released January 1, 2012 | Capitol Nashville

Kenny Rogers' They Don't Make Them Like They Used To album's title track does what one critic said of Neil Young's Time Fades Away: remove the word "time" and the album reviews itself -- "Neil Young Fades Away." The Burt Bacharach/Carole Bayer Sager song and production feels forced -- the only track sounding like classic Kenny and kicking in as it fades. With five producers total it may have been a case of too many cooks, the music here a far cry from the string of hits put together by Larry Butler on Liberty Records for the former lead singer of the First Edition. No, they don't make 'em like they used to, but that doesn't mean this is a bad record; in fact, it's a very good album from a country-pop singer trying his hand at the slick adult contemporary associated with Whitney Houston and Celine Dion. Either of those artists could have sang Dave Loggins' "Anything at All," and it may have hit, same with "You're My Love," which features El Debarge on backing vocals. For Rogers it is a wonderful experiment that sounds good but may have been too much of a paramorphism -- there's just not the balance that the Bee Gees struck with Kenny on Eyes That See in the Dark. Not including songwriters, almost four dozen individuals lent their talents to this underrated and pretty much forgotten 1986 album, Jay Graydon picking up where his colleague David Foster and George Martin left off on other RCA releases. The label didn't seem to be the company to keep this artist at the forefront, despite its fine work with his friend Dolly Parton. You'll find Rogers' co-hort Kin Vassy singing backing vocals on "Life Is Good, Love Is Better," Mike Boddicker on the title track, and Steve Lukather on the tune he co-wrote with Randy Goodrum, "If I Could Hold On to Love," but somehow quasi-disco wasn't going to work for an adult contemporary/country artist. Despite Rogers' friend Kim Carnes' success with "Bette Davis Eyes" at the beginning of the decade, Jay Graydon's guitar work with Alice Cooper and proficiency on Earth, Wind & Fire albums are where the producer leans towards here rather than drawing from his skills with artists like Parton. Make no mistake, this is Graydon's baby and it is admirable, from the stunning portrait of the star surrounded by pastels on the cover to the superbly slick presentation. Rogers is a total professional and pulls it off somewhat, but he does feel out of place. A reunion of the First Edition or the New Christy Minstrels may have been more interesting for the mid-'80s. Those voices would be certainly able enough to bring the title track home, the song "They Don't Make Them Like They Used To" the biggest disappointment here as it has so much to offer. It feels like Bacharach and Sager were going through the motions, and that's the pity, as the success of that soundtrack tune might've given the rest of this adult contemporary work a better chance. ~ Joe Viglione