Categories :

Similar artists

Albums

CD$19.99

Soul - Released June 12, 2020 | Spiritmuse Records

CD$8.99

Jazz - Released January 1, 2006 | Delmark

CD$8.99

Contemporary Jazz - Released January 1, 1994 | Delmark Records

CD$8.99

Jazz - Released January 1, 2006 | Delmark

The ever-evolving lineup of the Ethnic Heritage Ensemble keeps one thing consistent -- producing great records. This version is one of the best, featuring Kahil El'Zabar on drums, percussion, and mbira; Joseph Bowie on trombone and percussion; Ernest "Khabeer" Dawkins on alto and tenor sax, as well as percussion; and special guest Fareed Haque on acoustic guitar, electric guitar, and percussion. The four men create a fine balance, with the percussive elements of El'Zabar and the other players providing a strongly Africanized structure upon which to hang the music, while the horns and Fareed Haque's guitar playing pull the sound back in the direction of jazz. The musicians complement each other well, with even guests like Haque pulling an equal weight. His presence brings new life to the Ethnic Heritage Ensemble sound; on songs like "Katon," his rhythmic playing infuses the band with energy. Other strong songs include a wonderful percussion and voice version of "This Little Light of Mine," which displays a metaphysical weariness, and, at the same time, crackles with liveliness. Indeed, the whole of Freedom Jazz Dance seems to act as one gentle, life-affirming force. © Stacia Proefrock /TiVo
CD$8.99

Jazz - Released January 1, 2006 | Delmark

Here's another version of the Ethnic Heritage Ensemble, led by percussionist Kahil El'Zabar. Saxophonist and percussionist Ernest Dawkins is the new member, joining trombonist Joseph Bowie and percussionist Atu Harold Murray. While the material is jazz and avant in nature, there is also an underscored African presence, especially in the percussion. El'Zabar claims composer's credit on five of the seven selections. The two standards present are not surprising in the way they are approached -- "All Blues," which has been recorded by El'Zabar previously, is a mbira ostinato with trombone lead melody and alto sax counter, and "Well, You Needn't" is a Yoruban groove with neat Afro-scatting on the bridge. El'Zabar's "Ornette," which was previously documented by his Ritual Trio, is light Afro-funk with cowbell, congas, and more scatting. "The Chatham Dirge" features hand percussion and fluttery sax, and the title cut (which runs for 11:33, not 4:23 as listed) has ostinato tom-toms, lively repetitive alto, and counterpointed trombone. On the long, loping "Ancestral Song," mbira and chanting top a simmering sax and trombone undercurrent. The burner of the set is "From Whence We Came," a surging melody featuring Bowie's growling trombone solo and El'Zabar's hard swinging. All the intensity of the EHE is here, but it has a quieter sonority, allowing more subtle shades to rise to the surface. This version of the group needs to stay together and do more. © Michael G. Nastos /TiVo

Soul - Released April 28, 2020 | Spiritmuse Records

Download not available
CD$9.99

Electronic/Dance - Released June 9, 2006 | Deeper Soul Recordings

CD$8.99

Electronic/Dance - Released June 9, 2006 | Deeper Soul Recordings

CD$8.99

Jazz - Released January 1, 2001 | Delmark

One of Kahil El'Zabar's greatest assets is his flexibility -- the Chicago-based drummer for the Ritual Trio and the Ethnic Heritage Ensemble has never been afraid to hurl himself into a variety of avant-garde jazz situations, and his sense of adventure has served him well. This rewarding CD finds El'Zabar forming a duo with the distinctive violinist Billy Bang; not surprisingly, they enjoy a strong rapport and bring out the best in one another. Embracing mostly original material, the musicians favor an inside/outside approach and provide an album that is left of center but still quite musical. The influence of the AACM, which El'Zabar has been a member of since 1969, is impossible to miss on Spirits Entering; like so many AACM-minded releases, this CD opts for space rather than density. Tracks like Bang's "The Dream Merchant" and El'Zabar's Asian-influenced "The Ituri Fantasy" aren't harsh, abrasive, or confrontational -- they're probing and introspective in a spacey sort of way. World music is a strong influence on this release; African, Asian, and Middle Eastern elements are incorporated, and two traditional ethnic instruments that El'Zabar plays in addition to the drums are the African thumb piano and the Brazilian berimbau. While Spirits Entering isn't the first album to use these instruments in an avant-garde jazz setting, El'Zabar's thumb piano and berimbau solos demonstrate that they still have a lot of possibilities as jazz instruments. Those who have enjoyed El'Zabar's work with the Ritual Trio and the Ethnic Heritage Ensemble will also find a great deal to admire about Spirits Entering. © Alex Henderson /TiVo