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Jazz - Released October 24, 2014 | Nonesuch

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 4F de Télérama - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Jazz
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Jazz - Released May 25, 2018 | Nonesuch

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 Sterne Fono Forum Jazz
Transmission and legacy are at the heart of jazz. Even in the more radical moments, or even the revolutionary ones, jazz musicians have always, one way or another, paid tribute to their elders. With Still Dreaming, Joshua Redman only confirms that. With trumpet player Ron Miles, bass player Scott Colley and drummer Brian Blade, the saxophonist drives a quartet which pays homage to Old and New Dreams, a band carried between 1975 and 1987 by his late father, the saxophonist Dewey Redman. A formation then composed of double bass player Charlie Haden, trumpet player Don Cherry and drummer Ed Blackwell, all former bodyguards of Ornette Coleman… But if this story about transmission and legacy is at the heart of the music of Joshua Redman and his friends, everything here is all invention and creation. These four don’t intend to take us to the museum! Even when they reinterpret compositions such as Charlie Haden’s Playing or Ornette Coleman’s Comme il faut and The Rest, their approach isn’t some kind of basic sanctification. On the contrary! We are here in the presence of four virtuoso, each being among the best in their area. As for Redman, he has rarely played that well. He’s often economic in his play. His breath, never wordy, is the one of almost mystical incantations that Colley’s and Blade’s rhythms make even more majestic. And then there is Brian Blade, this drummer performing with feathers in his hands. He’s an impressive colorist who radiates on everything he touches… In short, this is a masterful disc for sophisticated ears. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Jazz - Released May 26, 2015 | Nonesuch

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Sélection JAZZ NEWS
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Jazz - Released September 9, 2016 | Nonesuch

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Indispensable JAZZ NEWS
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Jazz - Released April 22, 2011 | Nonesuch

Booklet Distinctions 4F de Télérama
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Jazz - Released May 7, 2013 | Nonesuch

Hi-Res Distinctions Hi-Res Audio
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Jazz - Released June 17, 2014 | Nonesuch

Booklet Distinctions Indispensable JAZZ NEWS
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Jazz - Released June 16, 2014 | Nonesuch

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Indispensable JAZZ NEWS
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Jazz - Released June 16, 2014 | Nonesuch

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Indispensable JAZZ NEWS
Trios Live features saxophonist Joshua Redman performing live in concert with his trio on two separate dates. The first concert was recorded in 2009 at New York's Jazz Standard and the second was recorded in 2013 at Washington's Blues Alley. Backing Redman on both of these dates is drummer Gregory Hutchinson; who is then joined by bassist Matt Penman on the Jazz Standard recording, and bassist Reuben Rogers for the Blues Alley performance. As there are no chordal instruments such as piano or guitar in Redman's trio, he is free to explore a wide harmonic color palette and does so here with plenty of exuberance. This is Redman the bluesy, muscular, yet mathematically concise improviser, digging deep into such influences as Sonny Rollins, Dexter Gordon, and Ornette Coleman. Although Redman has never shied away from progressive, extroverted improvisation, as Trios Live comes on the heels of his reflective, lushly produced 2013 orchestral ballads album, Walking Shadows, it has more in common with his adventurous 2007 studio trio album, Back East, as well as his fearless 2009 double-trios experiment, Compass. Along with three originals, on Trios Live we also get Redman's take on such standards as Kurt Weill and Bertolt Brecht's "Moritat (Mack the Knife)," Jay Livingston and Ray Evans' "Never Let Me Go," and Thelonious Monk's "Trinkle, Tinkle." Also included is Redman's frenetic reworking of Led Zeppelin's "The Ocean." Always an engaging improviser, Redman is perhaps at his best in a club setting and Trios Live does nothing to dissuade one of that notion. ~ Matt Collar
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Jazz - Released March 29, 2019 | Nonesuch

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Album titles can be throwaways, shockers or in the case of Joshua Redman’s latest, a statement of an overarching philosophy. Few jazz players on any instrument have fashioned a career as stable or respected as the one that saxophonist and composer Redman has carefully built since breaking on the scene with his 1993 self-titled debut (which earned him his first Grammy nomination). Since then, through a shifting array of ensembles, an unmistakable gift for lyricism, a recognizable saxophone tone and gift for choosing classy material and collaborators, Redman has become an eloquent, stylish purveyor of a coherent and melodic variety of improvisational jazz. Come What May's seven original compositions are more of the same, working in an engaging middle ground, somewhere between cloying smooth jazz and the jagged-edges of the avant-garde. While this may sound too mainstream for some, tunes like the wistful ballad that is the title track, the piano-driven push-pull groove of “Stagger Bear” or the fast, funk-inflected background of “I’ll Go Mine,” have a wonderfully seasoned artistry and undeniable instrumental virtuosity that makes this yet another pleasurable outing from a towering figure in modern straight-ahead jazz. Redman is mightily assisted by his touring Quartet of pianist Aaron Goldberg, bassist Reuben Rogers and drummer Gregory Hutchinson who somehow have not made an album together since 2001’s Passage of Time. Polished and practiced, this foursome epitomizes trust and conviction, generating soul and heart in the interplay between Redman’s deceptively emotional saxophone and Goldberg’s rhythmically inventive piano lines. Gorgeously rich and present sonics complete the latest triumph in a career focused on elegance and consummate taste. © Robert Baird / Qobuz
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Jazz - Released January 21, 1993 | Warner Jazz

Joshua Redman's sophomore effort found him leading a piano-less quartet that also included guitar great Pat Metheny and half of Ornette Coleman's trailblazing late-'50s/early-'60s quartet: acoustic bassist Charlie Haden and drummer Billy Higgins. With such company, Redman could have delivered a strong avant-garde or free jazz album; Haden and Higgins had played an important role in jazz's avant-garde because of their association with Coleman, and Metheny had himself joined forces with Coleman on their thrilling Song X session of 1985. But Wish isn't avant-garde; instead, it's a mostly inside post-bop date that emphasizes the lyrical and the introspective. The musicians swing hard and fast on Charlie Parker's "Moose the Mooche," but things become very reflective on pieces like Redman's "The Undeserving Many" and Metheny's "We Had a Sister." One of the nice things about Redman is his ability to provide jazz interpretations of rock and R&B songs. While neo-conservatives ignore them and many NAC artists simply provide boring, predictable, note-for-note covers, Redman isn't afraid to dig into them and show their jazz potential. In Redman's hands, Stevie Wonder's "Make Sure You're Sure" becomes a haunting jazz-noir statement, while Eric Clapton's ballad "Tears in Heaven" is changed from moving pop/rock to moving pop-jazz. The latter, in fact, could be called "smooth jazz with substance." Some of bop's neo-conservatives disliked the fact that Redman was playing with two of Coleman's former sidemen and a fusion icon like Metheny, but then, Redman never claimed to be a purist. Although Wish isn't innovative, it's an appealing CD from an improviser who is willing to enter a variety of musical situations. ~ Alex Henderson
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Jazz - Released September 24, 1996 | Warner Bros.

In his fifth outing as a leader, Joshua Redman breaks new ground with FREEDOM IN THE GROOVE. Adding another dimension to his already critically acclaimed discography, the young saxophonist explores a variety of grooves and meters while maintaining an infectious, swinging feel throughout. The music showcases the leader's compositional abilities, while giving the band--which features guitarist Peter Bernstein--plenty of room to explore the tunes' melodic and harmonic possibilities. The addition of the guitar to the quintet not only adds an exciting new voice to the group, but helps flesh-out the funky grooves and odd-metered tunes. FREEDOM IN THE GROOVE explores the funky, rhythmic edges of acoustic jazz, while maintaining the fluidity and freedom Redman has established in his earlier recordings.
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Jazz - Released September 9, 1994 | Nonesuch

In the extensive liner notes of this CD, tenor saxophonist Joshua Redman writes that the main problem with jazz at the time was not the music but the public perception of it as forbidding and overly intellectual; that in reality jazz is quite fun and emotional. Those descriptions can certainly be applied to Redman's music, which, while pulling at the boundaries of modern hard bop, is also fairly easy to grab on to. Joined by his regular bandmembers of the period (pianist Brad Mehldau, bassist Christian McBride and drummer Brian Blade), Redman performs a full set of originals which, although not derivative, do fit into the straight-ahead tradition. At this point in time, Redman was growing from album to album, having already started at a high level. A fine outing. ~ Scott Yanow
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Jazz - Released February 18, 2009 | Warner Jazz

Coming fast on the heels of Redman's collaborative Yaya3 date with the same players (organist Sam Yahel and drummer Brian Blade), Elastic is more about pop/soul-funk than jazz, but it doesn't sacrifice any of Yaya3's organic feeling and improvisational focus. Here Yahel plays not only Hammond organ, but also Fender Rhodes, clavinet, and other assorted electric keys. Redman makes liberal use of overdubbing and signal processing, much of which is surprisingly subtle. The result is quite a lot of sound for three people, quite a lot of inspired blowing, and quite a lot of stylistic ground covered. Highlights include the agitated, over-the-top "Still Pushin' That Rock," the tight funk and involved lines of "Jazz Crimes" and "News from the Front," and the slow gospel of "Can a Good Thing Last Forever?" Redman seems fond of the Rhodes-soprano sax combination, particularly on mellower themes like "The Long Way Home" and "Unknowing." While one has to admire Redman's musical open-mindedness, his writing can take on a middle-of-the-road quality at times; on this record it surfaces on "Boogielastic". It says something that Yahel contributed the most alluring piece, a short-and-sweet song in five called "Oumou." ~ David R. Adler
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Jazz - Released December 23, 2008 | Warner Bros.

In the early to mid-'90s, no "Young Lion" was hyped to death by jazz critics more than Joshua Redman; to hear some critics tell it, he was as important a saxophonist as John Coltrane, Dexter Gordon, or Sonny Rollins. The problem with such excessive hype is that it gives a young talent like Redman way too much to live up to at an early age; the tenor man was only 22 when this self-titled debut album was recorded, and he needed time to grow and develop. Nonetheless, Redman did show a lot of promise on this CD, which isn't in a class with Coltrane's A Love Supreme or Rollins' Saxophone Colossus (some critics really did have the audacity to make such claims) but showed Redman to be a swinging, expressive improviser who had impressive technique as well as versatility. Redman's playing is greatly influenced by funky, big-toned soul-jazz tenors like Eddie Harris, Gene Ammons, and Red Holloway, but his probing, searching qualities bring to mind Coltrane. Redman's gritty soul-jazz workout on James Brown's "I Got You (I Feel Good)" demonstrates that he isn't a stuffy neo-conservative, while his enjoyable interpretations of "Body and Soul" and Thelonious Monk's "Trinkle Tinkle" illustrate his ability to play "in the tradition," as hard boppers are fond of saying. Dizzy Gillespie's "Salt Peanuts" is pure bop, and Redman (whose acoustic support on this album includes pianist Kevin Hays, bassist Christian McBride, and drummer Gregory Hutchinson) gets into a Coltrane-influenced post-bop groove on his own "Sublimation." Joshua Redman isn't a masterpiece, but it let us know that he was certainly someone to keep an eye on. ~ Alex Henderson
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Bebop - Released February 15, 2007 | Nonesuch

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Jazz - Released January 31, 2019 | Nonesuch

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Jazz - Released August 25, 1995 | Warner Jazz

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Jazz - Released February 18, 2009 | Warner Jazz

Picking up on Herbie Hancock's "New Standards" idea, borrowing some old standards, and splitting the total down the middle, Joshua Redman lends his warm fatback tone, arching skyward passages and a post-bop quartet concept to ten popular songs of the 20th century. Richard Rodgers, Cole Porter, Jerome Kern, Irving Berlin, and the Gershwins share space with the Beatles, Joni Mitchell, Bob Dylan, Stevie Wonder and Prince -- distinguished songwriters all, yet the scorecard tells us that the oldsters' tunes consistently receive more interesting treatment than the rock/folk songs. "Yesterdays" is flexible enough to turn almost into an acoustic funk thing; "How Deep Is the Ocean" saunters along very soulfully; the near cha cha rhythm on "Love for Sale" pulls some inspired heat from Redman. On the other side of the divide, "The Times They Are A-Changin'" isn't very interesting, where even tricky rhythm changes and an Eddie Harris-like high note coda can't pump up an earthbound performance. "Eleanor Rigby" fragments under a jazz waltz treatment presumably planned with Coltrane's "My Favorite Things" in mind (Redman's soprano sounds desperately out of gas at the close). Oddly enough, a broadly funky Harris approach pays off on Prince's "How Come U Don't Call Me Anymore," the sole exception to the pattern. This is not to say that the rock/folk material is intrinsically inferior to the Tin Pan Alley standards -- no way. They simply do not translate very well into the language of the young neo-boppers, or at least, these neo-boppers on this given day. Brad Mehldau (piano), Larry Grenadier (bass) and Brian Blade (drums) make up the technically faultless, flexible piano trio, and most of the selections are separated by short, untitled interludes that usually grow more or less out of the preceding pieces. ~ Richard S. Ginell
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Jazz - Released April 5, 2009 | Warner Bros.

In his short career, Joshua Redman has been praised for his technical abilities and criticized for his lack of innovation -- not surprising responses to the work of a talented young artist. On Beyond, his seventh album which was recorded a few months after his 30th birthday, he attempts, as the title suggests, to try some new things. Employing an all new group consisting of pianist Aaron Goldberg, bass player Reuben Rogers, and drummer Gregory Hutchinson, he presents an album of original tunes to follow Timeless Tales (For Changing Times), an album of cover material. Eschewing the pat jazz formula of a head followed by improvisations, he adopts a more free-flowing structure for his compositions in which anyone can start and the tune can develop in an open-ended fashion. He also experiments with time signatures: "A Life?," the closing track, is in 5/4 time; "Stoic Revolutions" is in 6/4; "Belonging (Lopsided Lullaby)" is in 9/4; "Suspended Emanations" is in 10/4; and the lead-off track, "Courage (Asymmetric Aria)," is in 13/4. While no doubt hard to play, the tunes don' t sound all that complicated, perhaps because Redman's saxophone floats over the rhythm section, taking its time to make its statements. As the song titles imply, this is a contemplative album full of small, introspective pleasures, such as the exploratory "Leap of Faith," on which Redman and Mark Turner engage in a tenor conversation. It's not clear that the technical challenges Redman presents himself and his sidemen with ultimately force them to do anything new, but Beyond represents a gifted musician tinkering with his musical approach with often satisfying results. ~ William Ruhlmann