Your basket is empty

Categories :

Similar artists

Albums

From
HI-RES$21.99
CD$14.99

Masses, Passions, Requiems - Released March 10, 2017 | SDG

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - Gramophone Award - Gramophone Record of the Month - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
Recorded live at Pisa Cathedral in 2016, this recording of Bach's St. Matthew Passion, BWV 244, is of a piece with the touring Bach Cantata Pilgrimage recordings released in the early 2000s: it is rich yet lively, sung with precision yet a total sense of commitment in the moment. The singers -- the Monteverdi Choir of 30 with soloists all drawn from the choir, except for Jesus (Stephan Loges) and the Evangelist (James Gilchrist) -- performed from memory, and the feeling that the text is being communicated directly is even greater than is usual with Gardiner. An unusual feature of the recording is that the soloists are not single per part; the soprano solos are taken by no fewer than five different singers. Several (try Hannah Morrison in "Aus liebe") are lovely, and the effect of a space between the congregational chorales and the focus on an individual soloist is fascinating. The hair-trigger alertness of the chorus in the big numbers like "Sind Blitze, sind Donner in Wolken verschwunden?" is also extremely compelling. Gardiner and the Monteverdi Choir offer Bach with the luxury of old-fashioned Romantic versions combined with the agility of historical performance, and they've never done the combination better than they do here. © TiVo
From
HI-RES$14.99
CD$9.99

Masses, Passions, Requiems - Released October 13, 2017 | SDG

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or - Gramophone Editor's Choice - Le Choix de France Musique - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Jazz
So much can be said about this new recording featuring among others − but as the pièce de résistance − Bach’s Magnificat, performed by John Eliot Gardiner, that we simply don’t know where to start! In 1983 – already 35 years ago! – Gardiner gave his first vision of Magnificat BWV 234 in D major; here the version in question is the BWV 234a in E flat major, the original and initial version, the – extended – one Bach wrote as soon as 1723 while the BWV 234 version (more often played nowadays) only arose from adjustments made ten years later. Of course one can debate on the advantages of one over the other but for this recording, Gardiner put emphasis on the brilliance, vibrancy and stunning virtuosity imposed by the E-flat major tone and vigorous tempi, in other words: undeniably modern! Magnificat is preceded by the Mass in F major, one of Bach’s four Lutheran masses, proper gems that are too rarely performed. It’s worth noting that most movements are recycled from previous cantatas, but with thorough rewrites of course! You’ll also find one of Gardiner’s favourite cantatas, Süßer Trost, mein Jesus kömmt (Sweet comfort, my Jesus comes), BWV 151, composed for the Christmas period. With his English Baroque Soloists, his Monteverdi Choir and a broad group of soloists (the alto parts are given to a male voice, it’s worth mentioning in case… it’s not your cup of tea), Gardiner is once again standing on top of a great success.
From
HI-RES$14.99
CD$9.99

Symphonic Music - Released October 2, 2012 | SDG

Hi-Res Distinctions 5 de Diapason - Gramophone Editor's Choice - Exceptional Sound Recording
John Eliot Gardiner and the Orchestre Révolutionnaire et Romantique were part of the late 20th century vanguard that introduced period performance practices to the symphonies of Ludwig van Beethoven, and their classic 1994 cycle alerted musicians everywhere to the possibilities of applying historical research to familiar warhorses. On November 16, 2011, Gardiner and his musicians revisited the Symphony No. 5 in C minor and the Symphony No. 7 in A major in a concert at Carnegie Hall, recorded by WQXR, and the performances compare favorably with the earier recordings on Archiv. Gardiner's Beethoven is almost always brisk and bristling with nervous energy, and this is apparent in the quick tempos and the sharp attacks he asks of his players. Even the slow movements are played con moto, with a real feeling of forward motion and urgency that almost seems aggressive. But this style of playing Beethoven has won many supporters and practically become mainstream, as historically informed performances increase in availability and audiences learn to appreciate the sounds of authentic instruments, the appropriate Classical ensemble size, and the techniques that were employed in Beethoven's time. While the performances meet the highest expectations, from time to time the audio is a little unbalanced in dynamics, suggesting a problem with microphone placement or mixing. © TiVo
From
HI-RES$14.99
CD$9.99

Symphonies - Released October 7, 2014 | SDG

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 4 étoiles Classica - 5 Sterne Fono Forum Klassik
An early leader in historically informed performances, John Eliot Gardiner was among the first conductors to present the nine symphonies of Ludwig van Beethoven in authentic Classical style, and his 1994 set with the Orchestre Révolutionnaire et Romantique has become a touchstone. For this live album on Soli Deo Gloria, recorded at Cadogan Hall, London, in 2013, Gardiner and his period ensemble revisit the Symphony No. 2 in D major and the Symphony No. 8 in F major, two of the less frequently performed of Beethoven's symphonies but delightful for their energy and abundant humor. True to expectations, Gardiner's tempos are brisk and his accentuation marked, and the orchestra plays with its characteristic sonorities, which include a glossy string tone, pungent woodwinds, incisive brass, and timpani played with hard mallets. The attention to details highlights Beethoven's original and distinctive style of orchestration, and the musicians' alertness and vitality give these performances an electric charge that is often lacking in conventional performances. This is a follow-up to the 2012 album, Live at Carnegie Hall, in which Gardiner and the ORR played Beethoven's Fifth and Seventh symphonies, also on the SDG label, so this disc raises hopes of more live recordings covering the rest of the cycle. © TiVo
From
HI-RES$22.49
CD$14.99

Masses, Passions, Requiems - Released November 6, 2015 | SDG

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 4 étoiles Classica
For his new recording of this monument to Bach, John Eliot Gardiner is limited to a light chamber orchestra (obviously the English Baroque Soloists, founded here 37 years ago by Gardiner!), a choir of reasonable size (the Monteverdi Choir, same remark...), and a meticulous - but above all, calm - conducting of the articulations, phrases and lines, almost like a kind of chamber opera. The tempos are rather upbeat, like baroque music back in its heyday - the perfect balance between respecting history and the quest for beauty of sound. Gardiner has nothing dogmatic - making this new recording a particularly welcome perspective among the ample discography(yet unsatisfactory) of this Mass en si. © SM / Qobuz
From
HI-RES$14.99
CD$9.99

Sacred Oratorios - Released March 4, 2014 | SDG

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - Exceptional Sound Recording
After the completion of the magisterial touring sequence of Bach cantatas from conductor John Eliot Gardiner and his Monteverdi Choir and English Baroque Soloists, it seems that the prolific music-making will continue with non-cantata works. This strong recording of Bach's Easter Oratorio, BWV 249, was released just in time for the 2014 Easter holiday and should find the same demand as the rest of Gardiner's output. The Easter Oratorio is more an oversized cantata than a full-scale treatment with narrator, chorus, and soloists in the manner of Bach's other large religious works; it has no narrating Evangelist, consists mostly of solos in dialogue with each other, and apparently was actually adapted from an earlier pastoral birthday cantata. The performance here has the positives typical of Gardiner's Bach recordings: warmth, deep familiarity with the texts, and smooth ensemble work born of long acquaintance among the musicians. The choir of 23 is perfectly sized for the work, and the sound, with Gardiner's engineers no longer constrained by the requirements of the churches where the ensemble appeared on tour, is unusually clear. The soloists are drawn from the choir, a slight negative given that the Easter Oratorio stands or falls on its solos; they actually do better in the intimate funeral Cantata No. 106, BWV 106 ("Actus Tragicus"), that opens the program. In general, though, this is a release that Gardiner fans will be glad to have. © TiVo
From
HI-RES$14.49
CD$10.49

Classical - Released February 7, 2020 | LSO Live

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 4F de Télérama - 5 étoiles de Classica
The second album in Sir John Eliot Gardiner's Schumann series with the London Symphony Orchestra travels from glorious fanfare to dream-like passages with the lively 'Spring' and 'Rhenish' symphonies. From the dramatic first trumpet-call which awakens the frozen landscape, the First Symphony is a celebration of spring. It moves through the season and a gruff folk-song Scherzo until finally a jubilant conclusion dances into summer. Desperate, heartfelt and elegant, the "Manfred" Overture opens with an urgent impetus that only increases through the work, displaying the intense strife which lies ahead for its protagonist. Schumann’s Third is one of the composer’s most impressive, painting a euphoric picture of the German Rhineland in broad Beethovenian style and closing with an exhilarating finale. © LSO Live
From
HI-RES$14.99
CD$9.99

Choral Music (Choirs) - Released December 3, 2013 | SDG

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or - Gramophone Editor's Choice
John Eliot Gardiner's 1991 Archiv recording of Ludwig van Beethoven's Missa Solemnis in D major, Op. 123, remains a high point of his catalog, but that hasn't prevented him from revisiting this masterpiece. On October 17, 2012, Gardiner led a live radio broadcast from the Barbican in London, and delivered a thrilling performance that has been released by BBC Radio 3. Performed by the Monteverdi Choir and the Orchestre Révolutionnaire et Romantique, and featuring a virtuosic quartet of soprano Lucy Crowe, mezzo-soprano Jennifer Johnston, tenor James Gilchrist, and bass Matthew Rose, Beethoven's great mass is given a period reading, yet it sounds as robust and assertive as any mainstream interpretation. Gardiner has never been especially delicate in Romantic works, and even though one might think refinement is the hallmark of historically informed performances, he puts enough force and vigor into this rendition to dispose of that notion for good. Tempos are on the fast side, attacks are incisive, and the rhythms are strongly accented, so the music is almost combative in its directness. While this is an exciting Missa Solemnis, above all in the riveting Gloria, it falls a bit short of expressing Beethoven's compassion and humanity in the Kyrie, the Sanctus, and the Agnus Dei. Gardiner's version is clear-headed, if a little severe at times, and it is decidedly bracing, but there are more reflective and moving recordings available. © TiVo
From
HI-RES$14.49
CD$10.49

Classical - Released September 20, 2019 | LSO Live

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
On its face, this 2019 release by John Eliot Gardiner and the London Symphony Orchestra seems fairly straightforward and standard, with an overture at the opening and two symphonies by the great Romantic composer Robert Schumann occupying the rest of the program. Yet listeners may consider that it is far from routine on further investigation. The overture to Genoveva is the only part of Schumann's 1850 opera that is regularly performed nowadays, though it remains relatively obscure when compared to other overtures that serve to open concerts. Heard more frequently, the Symphony No. 2 in C major has had a fairly stable performance history, though like Schumann's other symphonies, it hasn't achieved the status of greatness accorded to the symphonies of Beethoven or Brahms, and remains in the second tier of 19th century symphonies. The Symphony No. 4 in D minor, however, may startle listeners who were expecting the long-established version of 1851. Instead, Gardiner has chosen the original 1841 version, which Clara Schumann described as unfinished sketches, but which Brahms favored over the revised version and revealed it to be complete when he published it in 1891. Chronologically, this was actually Schumann's second symphony, though it was first published after the two intervening symphonies and became the Fourth by default. Schumann's leaner orchestration has not been smoothed over or thickened with the later excessive doublings of woodwinds and strings, and while the form is almost identical to the later version, experienced listeners should note the many differences which are evident in this reading. The live recording by LSO Live captures the orchestra's sound with great clarity and fine details, which certainly makes Schumann's richly scored music easier to follow with pleasure. © TiVo
From
CD$14.99

Cantatas (sacred) - Released October 1, 2010 | SDG

Distinctions Diapason d'or
From
CD$10.49

Sacred Vocal Music - Released January 25, 2019 | Warner Classics

Distinctions 5 de Diapason
From
CD$25.49

Classical - Released February 1, 2011 | Warner Classics International

Distinctions Diapason d'or
From
CD$9.99

Symphonic Music - Released February 1, 2011 | SDG

Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
Anyone who has followed the career of John Eliot Gardiner knows that he is one of the world's leading authorities on authentic performance practices, and that his approach to Baroque and Classical music involves using original instruments, choosing the proper size of ensemble, and playing the music in the style of the time period. In the case of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart's Symphony No. 39 in E flat major, K. 543, and the Symphony No. 41 in C major, K. 551, "Jupiter," Gardiner and the English Baroque Soloists, a chamber-size orchestra, meet all expectations. Rhythms are crisp and precise, the strings play with minimal vibrato and have a lustrous aural sheen, the winds and brass have the distinctive colors of pre-modern instruments, and the sound of the ensemble is close and intimate. In terms of his tempos, Gardiner is fairly close to accepted mainstream speeds, so the music doesn't seem especially brisk, but at no point is the pacing excessvely slow. The fastest tempo is taken in the Finale of the "Jupiter," which warrants it for the sake of building excitement in Mozart's multi-subject fugue. These live performances have remarkably noise-free reproduction, and the timbres of the orchestra are vibrant and alive, despite the sound-absorbing properties of an audience. © TiVo
From
HI-RES$22.49
CD$14.99

Concertos - Released October 1, 2009 | SDG

Hi-Res
Listeners who like their period performances of the music of J.S. Bach to be played as fast as possible will rejoice at John Eliot Gardiner's quicksilver set of the Brandenburg Concertos with the English Baroque Soloists, because his need for speed is fully indulged here. Gardiner's electrifying tempos almost push his musicians to their capacity for quickness and accuracy, and perhaps a bit too much for comfort. For listeners, it may take sitting through the entirety of the Brandenburg Concerto No. 1, and perhaps even part of the Brandenburg Concerto No. 2, to acclimatize to the briskness and to get used to the staccato accentuation. But if this kind of high-energy playing appeals -- and there are undoubtedly fans of this super-brisk style of performing Baroque music -- then the set will be appreciated for its other authentic features. Gardiner keeps his forces lean and the instrumentation appropriate to its era, and ornamentation and other liberties of interpretation are in keeping with the best scholarship. This is definitely a historically informed set of the Brandenburgs, which counterbalances any number of other ahistorical performances of the past, which presented these concertos with sluggish tempos, modern instruments, and large string and wind sections that were far from nimble. Gardiner's approach is challenging and bracing, so this set should certainly be heard by anyone who studies these popular works. Whether one can embrace them fully is another matter, but they are definitely ear-opening experiences. © TiVo
From
CD$76.99

Classical - Released January 1, 2010 | Archiv Produktion

Deutsche Grammophon/Archiv Productions' 22-disc set of J.S. Bach's sacred choral works isn't a complete traversal of the composer's choral music, but the major and best-known works are all here, plus a number of more obscure ones. The Mass in B minor, the St. Matthew and St. John Passions, the Christmas Oratorio, and the Magnificat are included, as well as 35 cantatas. The compilation reissues all of the performances that John Eliot Gardiner, leading the Monteverdi Choir and the original instrument orchestra, the English Baroque Soloists, recorded between 1983 and 2000 for Philips or Deutsche Grammophon. Gardiner and his forces, outstanding talents and leading proponents of historically informed performance practice, deliver splendid accounts of Bach's vibrant music. Many of the recordings have been hailed as among the finest ever of these pieces and have been showered with awards and honors. The soloists, some of the brightest Baroque singers of the late 20th century, include Emma Kirkby, Bernarda Fink, Magdalena Kozená, Anne Sofie von Otter, Sara Mingardo, Derek Lee Ragin, Mark Padmore, and Anthony Rolfe Johnson. The recorded sound, it almost goes without saying, is engineered at the very high standards for which Philips and DG are known. With a list price of just over two dollars a disc, the compilation is a remarkable bargain. This is a set that fans of Bach, or of Baroque music, or of stellar vocal and choral singing will not want to miss. © TiVo
From
CD$14.99

Cantatas (sacred) - Released March 30, 2010 | SDG

With the John Eliot Gardiner "Bach Cantata Pilgrimage" series, as issued on Soli Deo Gloria, all recorded during a live tour and gradually parsed out in packages practically identical in appearance, one can be forgiven for some confusion regarding this series. Although this is Bach Cantatas, Vol. 2, and was recorded in Paris and Zurich in the summer of 2000, the two-disc set is the 24th issue in the series and was not released until the spring of 2010, patiently waiting almost a full decade for its turn in the release sequence. The Paris performance on the first disc features Bach's cantatas for the Second Sunday After Trinity (BWVs 2, 10, and 76) along with Heinrich Schütz's motet "Die Himmel erzählen die Ehre Gottes," which shares the same melody as Bach's source for BWV 76. The second, Zurich performance includes Bach's cantatas for the Third Sunday After Trinity, BWV 21 and 135, only, so the program is filled out with a performance of the Triple Concerto in A minor, BWV 1044. Soloists include Stephen Varcoe and Daniel Taylor in Paris and Katharine Fuge in Zurich; oddly, the instrumental soloists in BWV 1044 are not singled out in the package notes, though they are more than likely section leaders from within the English Baroque Soloists. Though top billed, the Monteverdi Choir is heard only intermittently of course, but enough to reserve its rightful place as the star of the show, apart from Gardiner himself. These performances are to some extent conditioned by the vagaries of live recording; the sound in Paris' Basilique Saint-Denis is good but not awesome, whereas in Zurich's Fraumünster Kirche the sound is clearer and has a bit more presence. An important part of the basic concept of the Bach Cantata Pilgrimage was that each concert be given in a different European landmark. Alto Daniel Taylor is not having a particularly good night in Paris, but that's not too much of a distraction; overall the soloists, both instrumental and vocal, acquit themselves well although it's a little hard to hear the harpsichord in the Triple Concerto. All of the performances are crisp and professional, and there is something of a traditional aspect to them; Gardiner clearly prefers a romantic approach in the handling of the chorus and the band is a little bigger than a typical, one-or-two-to-a-part period instrument ensemble. If a listener is already investing in this series, then Soli Deo Gloria's Bach Cantatas, Vol. 2, should more or less deliver what the others in the same series put forth. However, if the listener is only looking for a recording of one or even all of these pieces, weighing one's relative options might not be a fruitless task. © TiVo
From
CD$12.99

Classical - Released January 20, 1993 | Decca Music Group Ltd.

From
CD$14.99

Cantatas (sacred) - Released September 1, 2010 | SDG

Booklet
From
CD$14.99

Classical - Released January 1, 2009 | SDG

The Bach cantata pilgrimage of conductor John Eliot Gardiner, with his Monteverdi Choir and English Baroque Soloists, began on Christmas of 1999 and continued through the year 2000. At first the musicians retraced some of Bach's steps through northern Germany, then performed in a variety of churches in England and northwestern Europe, matching the cantatas as closely as possible to the events in the liturgical year for which they were intended. It was an impressive logistical undertaking, supported financially by the Prince of Wales, among others, and the handsomely packaged live recordings that emerged from the project have taken several years to appear. This one is an excellent example of why they were worth the wait. There's nothing so radical about Gardiner's interpretations; he uses a moderate-sized choir at a time when the cutting-edge favors very small groups or even one voice per part, and his soloists, while more than competent, aren't the sort around whom a performance can be organized, as with some of the recent Bach cantata discs directed by Ton Koopman. Where Gardiner excels is in the pure human understanding of the texts Bach sets and of his response to them. Hear the almost sarcastic tone of the opening bass aria of the Cantata No. 181, Leichtgesinnte Flattergeister, BWV 181 (CD 2, track 6, the only possible complaint against the packaging is that there is no full tracklist other than the German and English texts of the cantatas themselves), or the militantly anti-Catholic and anti-"Turkish" (it's not only the Jews who get rough treatment from Bach) Cantata No. 126, "Erhalte uns, Herr, bei deinem Wort," BWV 126. Here Gardiner pushes tenor James Gilchrist to the absolute limit in the at first deceptively prayerful but soon over-the-top aria "Sende deine Macht von oben" (CD 2, track 12); Gardiner's conception of the overall mood rules the interpretation. He expands on those conceptions, taking into account historical and musicological matters, in booklet notes, based on his own journals during the trip, and these are in many cases worth the purchase price by themselves; they offer exceptional syntheses of technical and critical perspectives. Gardiner's Bach series isn't the most "perfect" available, but it may be the most profound. The sound in both these locations (one in the Netherlands, one in Britain) is clear, aided perhaps by backup rehearsal recordings made in case of fluffed notes or coughing audiences. © TiVo
From
CD$21.99

Classical - Released June 30, 2009 | Warner Classics International