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Country - Released April 10, 2020 | BMG Rights Management (US) LLC

The years started piling up for John Anderson. He spent the better part of four decades on the road, with his glory days of the early '80s laying the groundwork for years of touring and the occasional comeback, and he seemed on track to stay on this course until a serious health scare in the late 2010s. Anderson kept the details of his health quiet, but during his recovery something serendipitous happened. Dan Auerbach -- the lead Black Key who had also become a Nashville impresario with his Easy Eye Sound studio and label -- reached out to Anderson as a fan, but he soon became a collaborator, co-writing the ten songs that comprise Years with the hardcore country singer and producing the album as well. Allusions to survival are scattered throughout Years but it's hard to call it a confessional album; if Anderson has a difficult time disclosing the details of his health in public, he's certainly not going to do it on a record. Such open-ended sentiments are ideal for songs, however, since they help turn the specific into the universal, and that's a trick that Anderson pulls off with Years. He sounds reflective, grateful to still be here singing songs, and wise enough to let plenty of light into his ruminations. Much of that sweetness is due to Auerbach's decision to pitch the production of Years somewhere between the gently rolling progressive country of the dawn of the '70s and the smooth barroom country that's Anderson's specialty. This means Years is a bit more ornate than most Anderson records, yet the layers of guitars and keyboards give the vocalist a rich, sympathetic bed to sing with nuance and grace. His performance, combined with the elegant sweep of Auerbach's production and the emotive songs, turn Years into a minor latter-day masterpiece from the country singer. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Country - Released April 10, 2020 | BMG Rights Management (US) LLC

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Country - Released September 1, 2002 | RLG - BMG Heritage

John Anderson burst on the country music scene in the late '70s as one of the first of the new breed of singers known as "new traditionalists." They were dedicated to playing country the way Hank and Merle and Lefty did, and to keeping the traditions of real country alive. This collection of hits by Anderson focuses on his time at BNA Records in the 1990s. His hitmaking days had seemed over before he joined BNA, but soon he found himself back at the top of the charts. Collected here are his two number ones, "Straight Tequila Night" and "Money in the Bank"; the title track to his double platinum record, Seminole Wind; five more Top Ten hits; and five rare B-Sides. This disc is an ideal compilation of 1990s John Anderson and is highly recommended to lovers of traditional country music. © Tim Sendra /TiVo
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Country - Released January 1, 1997 | Special Products

Although it suffers a little bit from uneven material, Takin' the Country Back is one of John Anderson's best latter-day efforts, thanks to his impassioned vocals and the clean, muscular production from Keith Stegall. © Thom Owens /TiVo
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Country - Released September 16, 2002 | BNA Records Label

Greatest Hits is a 15-track compilation that features John Anderson's '90s hits for BNA Records, as well as selections from his '80s work for RCA Records. The result is a career-spanning compilation that touches on most of Anderson's best work, including hit singles like "Swingin'" and "Money in the Bank." Consequently, it's the best place to get acquainted with one of the trailblazing new traditionalists of the '80s. © Thom Owens /TiVo
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Classical - Released November 1, 1997 | Nimbus Records

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Country - Released March 17, 1998 | BNA Records Label

Super Hits contains ten tracks from John Anderson's RCA recordings, mixing latter-day hits with re-recordings of early hits like "Swingin'." Among the featured songs are "My Kind of Crazy," "Paradise," "I Wish I Could Have Been There," "Money in the Bank," "I've Got It Made," and "Seminole Wind." © Thom Owens /TiVo
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Country - Released July 3, 1993 | BNA Records Label

Solid Ground is a fitting title for this album, as John Anderson was surely in his stride when he recorded this follow-up to his comeback, Seminole Wind. Anderson's strongest point is that he comes across as an honest-to-God good ol' boy -- which many posers of contemporary country only claim to be -- and nowhere is this more evident than on the first track, "Money in the Bank." He turns the thankful tune into gold with his trademark twang, then turns right around and nails an ode to regret for what his success has cost him on "I Wish I Could Have Been There.." Though there aren't any tracks as immediately accessible as "Straight Tequila Night," "Let Go of the Stone," "Look Away," or the title track, the cuts on this album are more assured, finding Anderson maturing as both a vocalist and a producer. Though he co-wrote only four of the ten tracks, he owns all of them, making this a classic country album of the early '90s. © Bryan Buss /TiVo
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Country - Released January 3, 2006 | Rhino Atlantic

The occasional use of strings in this album was probably master-minded by former Don Law protege Frank Jones, who co-produced it. Twin fiddles and steel guitar dominate, though, especially in a remake of Ferlin Husky's "The Waltz You Saved for Me," featuring Emmylou Harris. It includes "Swingin'" and a new version of Lefty Frizzell's "Long Black Veil" -- the very last track recorded in the legendary Columbia Studio B. © Tom Roland /TiVo
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Country - Released February 26, 1996 | BNA Records Label

Featuring guest appearances by Levon Helm and Mark Knopfler, John Anderson's Paradise is a typically consistent effort from the singer, featuring a handful of great songs that cancel out the fair amount of filler on the record. © Sara Sytsma /TiVo
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Country - Released May 26, 2015 | Bayou Boys Music Group LLC

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Country - Released September 18, 2007 | Rhino - Warner Records

John Anderson probably knew he was leaving Warner Bros. when he cut Countrified, which is not to say he was coasting when he recorded it. He produced the set with Jim Ed Norman and cut several tunes with his touring band. It may be the most country album he made for Warner since his first albums, but it was too little, too late. "Countrified" is a string of country songwriting clichés, somewhat redeemed by Anderson's over the top vocals, "Wife's Little Pleasures" is better, a song about a drunk making amends for his sins by paying a punishing alimony to his ex, with a darkly humorous lyric, and "Honky Tonk Crowd" is an unusually understated drinking song with some boozy fiddle fills. The album's best and most atypical number is "Yellow Creek," a ghost story about a cowboy haunted by the spirits of the Native Americans who once lived on his land. Anderson's subdued delivery makes the song especially poignant. Other winners include "Do You Have a Garter Belt," a salacious, bluesy rocker with some stinging lead guitar and Anderson blowing some credible blues harp; Merle Haggard's "The Fightin' Side of Me" played in that lazy, stomping Waylon Jennings beat and featuring an Anderson vocal that owes much to Haggard's phrasing; a down-and-dirty R&B version of the Bo Diddley/Willie Dixon classic "You Can't Judge a Book by the Cover" with some slashing ice-and-fire guitar work; and a sanctified take on Thomas A. Dorsey's "Peace in the Valley," a fine tune to end his last Warner album on a graceful note. © j. poet /TiVo
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Country - Released September 16, 2002 | BNA Records Label

Essential contains 16 well-chosen tracks taken from John Anderson's early- to mid-'80s recordings on Warner Bros., including the modern honky tonk hits "Straight Tequila Night," "Let Go of the Stone," "Money in the Bank," and his biggest country crossover smash, "Swingin'." This is an adequate compilation, but it's missing too many hits to be comprehensive. Pick up the double-disc John Anderson Anthology instead. © Al Campbell /TiVo
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Country - Released March 27, 2000 | Columbia Nashville

Columbia Records, which signed John Anderson to his fifth major-label affiliation in 2000, must figure that it is once again time for the veteran country singer to make one of his comebacks. Anderson struggled early in his career until early 1981, when he began a string of hits with "1959." He cooled off in the mid-'80s, switched labels several times, and returned to the top of the charts in 1992 with "Straight Tequila Night," leading to another string of hits that lasted into 1995. Another couple of label switches landed him at Columbia for the 2000 chart single "Nobody's Got It All," followed by this identically titled album, his first new collection in nearly four years. But in or out of commercial favor, Anderson takes pretty much the same approach. His up-tempo songs have a honky-tonk feel, but he really shines on the ballads, which prominently feature steel guitar and fiddle in traditional country style. It's his voice, a vulnerable, slightly wheezy tenor, that works better on the slow material, whether it's a typically sentimental, quasi-religious country tearjerker like "The Call" or one of Anderson's many conservative reflections on how much better life used to be, such as "I Ain't Afraid of Dying." Producers Blake Chancey and Paul Worley (country's hottest production team of the late '90s, due to their work with the Dixie Chicks) try to vary things, having Anderson turn nearly comic on "The Big Revival" and reach for crossover with Bruce Springsteen's "Atlantic City" (which only emphasizes Anderson's vocal similarity to Levon Helm, who has recorded the same song with the Band) and giving the singer an up-tempo, horn-filled arrangement on the album's second single, "You Ain't Hurt Nothin' Yet." But the real potential hits are romantic ballads like "I Love You Again" and mid-tempo numbers like the rueful "It Ain't Easy Being Me" (with its witty tag line, "I've had to work to be the jerk I've come to be"). And a hit is what Anderson needs to turn his career around one more time. © William Ruhlmann /TiVo
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Country - Released April 10, 2007 | Rhino - Warner Records

His second album (obviously), this traditionally minded package contrasted with the bulk of the material released in the same Urban Cowboy-influenced time period. His cover of Lefty Frizzell's "I Love You a Thousand Ways" shows his roots nicely, and "I'm Just an Old Chunk of Coal (But I'm Gonna Be a Diamond Someday)" is simply classic. © Tom Roland /TiVo
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Country - Released March 2, 2007 | Rhino - Warner Records

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Country - Released September 11, 1984 | Warner Records

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Country - Released September 18, 2007 | Rhino - Warner Records

John Anderson was just coming off his monster hit "Swingin'" when this set came out in 1983, perhaps giving him the courage to record a couple of bluesy rock & roll tunes, although most of the material is cut from the hardcore cloth Anderson had become famous for. "Black Sheep" is a growling rocker about hard luck and hard times written by Hollywood writer Danny Darst and director Robert Altman, who knew a thing or two about Nashville. It was a number one single. "Haunted House" is a novelty hit that gets trotted out every Halloween. Anderson's version is as much honky tonk as rock, with snappy solos from Mike Jordan's piano and Vern Pilder's twangy guitar. "Let Somebody Else Drive" became a signature tune for Mothers Against Drunk Driving, but Anderson's growling vocal implies more than a passing knowledge of boozy good times. Anderson's own "Things Ain't Been the Same Around the Farm" sounds like the boy moved a rockin' R&B band into the spread after baby split. Fiddles keep it country, but the female backing vocals suggest Memphis soul music. The title track sports a bit of easy listening sax and a chooglin' backbeat as well as pedal steel supporting Anderson's vocal, as much soul as country. The country tracks mine several traditional styles. "Blue Lights and Bubbles" is a drinking song delivered with a bit of Texas swing, "Look What Followed Me Home" and Anderson's "Call on Me" are lovesick waltzes, the latter one of Anderson's best love ballads. "An Occasional Eagle" is a moving love song to the wildlife of Alaska and our national bird, while "Old Mexico" combines R&B, country, and a bit of Tejano funk to tip its cowboy hat to drinking and good times. This is another great Anderson album without a weak track. © j. poet /TiVo
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Country - Released June 2, 2009 | Rhino - Warner Records

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Country - Released May 9, 2011 | The Dave Cash Collection - OMP