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Classical - Released November 13, 2020 | Naxos

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Diapason d'or
Florent Schmitt was a student of Massenet and Fauré, and winner of the coveted Prix de Rome. His impressionistic style blends influences ranging from Debussy to Wagner, with references to Stravinsky and other contemporaries. Conceived as a ballet but revised as a symphonic poem, La Tragédie de Salomé depicts Salome’s dangerous seductiveness with subtle magnificence. Narrative symbolism also applies to the evocative word painting of the exquisite Musique sur l’eau. The perilous saga of Oriane et le Prince d’Amour contrasts with the poetic tapestry of orchestral colours in Légende, in a version that replaces the original solo saxophone with violin. © Naxos
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Symphonic Music - Released October 12, 2018 | Naxos

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
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Classical - Released January 12, 2018 | Naxos

Hi-Res Booklet
Zoltán Kodály, like Bartók, investigated Eastern European folk music and drew on it in concert pieces. He retained a basically late Romantic idiom and did not think through the tonal implications of his material as Bartók did, with the result that his work has been somewhat neglected. Yet Bartók certainly knew Kodály's work, and the Buffalo Philharmonic Orchestra and conductor JoAnn Falletta perform a major service here by recording Kodály's comparatively rare Concerto for orchestra, written three years before Bartók's. Did Bartók know the work? Surely. Did he borrow from it? Probably not. But consider the second theme of the Dances of Galánta, the rhythmic shape of which is close to that of the Bartók Concerto for Orchestra finale: perhaps it was a case of covering the tracks of influence a little bit. The Variations on a Hungarian Folk Song of Kodály are also well worth a hearing: zippy little takes on the song that approach Bartók for economy. And if it's beautiful tunes you're after, the final Dances of Marosszék has one to rival anything in Bartók. A very satisfying hour-plus of Hungarian music, and Naxos gets excellent engineering results from Buffalo's Kleinhans Music Hall, one of the finer among the older American symphony halls. © TiVo