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R&B - Released June 17, 2011 | Blues Babe Records

Distinctions 4F de Télérama - Sélection Les Inrocks
Jill Scott has been through many changes since 2007's The Real Thing: Words & Sounds, Vol. 3: a divorce, a brief but intense love affair that produced a child, acting roles in Tyler Perry's Why Did I Get Married? and Hounddog, her starring role in HBO's The No. 1 Ladies' Detective Agency, and signing with Warner Bros. The Light of the Sun is a record of the rocky road to empowerment. Scott and Lee Hutson, Jr. are the album's executive producers; they also collaborate in songwriting and arrangements on numerous selections. Opener "Blessed," produced by Dre & Vidal, kicks it off in slippery, hip-hop soul style; a harp, strings, and a fluttering dubwise bassline underscore the shuffling rhythm. Scott expresses spoken and sung gratitude for and about her new baby, career, life, and support system. Poetry and song are woven with elegance in a nocturnal groove. The hit pre-release single "So in Love," produced by Kelvin Wooten, is a modern Philly soul fan's dream, with its lithe, fingerpopping bassline, shimmering drums, and seeming bliss arising between Scott and Anthony Hamilton, who turn in a grand duet performance. "Shame" (featuring Eve & the A Group), is grand, old-school funk with killer backing vocals that range from P-Funk-esque vocal choruses to doo wop with sampled classic ska as Scott raps defiantly with Eve. One of the sleepers on the set is the stunning "La Boom Vent Suite," a sultry number produced by Scott and Hutson. It's a militant, funky soul, kiss-off tune, that declares: "I've been waiting for so long/but somebody else has been sniffing at my dress." "Hear My Call" is literally a prayer for healing; with its elegantly arranged strings, it's as heartfelt and humble as desperate need can be. There is one misstep here: "So Gone (What My Mind Says)" didn't require Paul Wall's tired, generic, boastful rapping to work. That said, the rhythm collision with human beatbox Doug E. Fresh on "All Cried Out Redux," complete with ragtime piano sample, is a novelty number that works. After the album's first third, it's all Scott, and (mostly) all sublime. The sparsely produced "Quick" (produced by Wayne Campbell) records the heartbreak in the brief relationship that produced her son. "Making You Wait" is another self-determination anthem that addresses romance, with spacious Rhodes and synth strings weaving beats together. Scott lays down the spoken word "Womanifesto" that recalls the poetry of her early career, just before the steamy, sexual "Rolling Hills" touches on jazz, blues, and late-'70s soul with effortless ease to close it. On The Light of the Sun, Scott sounds more in control than ever; her spoken and sung phrasing (now a trademark), songwriting, and production instincts are all solid. This is 21st century Philly soul at its best. ~ Thom Jurek
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R&B - Released June 17, 2011 | Blues Babe Records

Distinctions 4F de Télérama - Sélection Les Inrocks
Jill Scott has been through many changes since 2007's The Real Thing: Words & Sounds, Vol. 3: a divorce, a brief but intense love affair that produced a child, acting roles in Tyler Perry's Why Did I Get Married? and Hounddog, her starring role in HBO's The No. 1 Ladies' Detective Agency, and signing with Warner Bros. The Light of the Sun is a record of the rocky road to empowerment. Scott and Lee Hutson, Jr. are the album's executive producers; they also collaborate in songwriting and arrangements on numerous selections. Opener "Blessed," produced by Dre & Vidal, kicks it off in slippery, hip-hop soul style; a harp, strings, and a fluttering dubwise bassline underscore the shuffling rhythm. Scott expresses spoken and sung gratitude for and about her new baby, career, life, and support system. Poetry and song are woven with elegance in a nocturnal groove. The hit pre-release single "So in Love," produced by Kelvin Wooten, is a modern Philly soul fan's dream, with its lithe, fingerpopping bassline, shimmering drums, and seeming bliss arising between Scott and Anthony Hamilton, who turn in a grand duet performance. "Shame" (featuring Eve & the A Group), is grand, old-school funk with killer backing vocals that range from P-Funk-esque vocal choruses to doo wop with sampled classic ska as Scott raps defiantly with Eve. One of the sleepers on the set is the stunning "La Boom Vent Suite," a sultry number produced by Scott and Hutson. It's a militant, funky soul, kiss-off tune, that declares: "I've been waiting for so long/but somebody else has been sniffing at my dress." "Hear My Call" is literally a prayer for healing; with its elegantly arranged strings, it's as heartfelt and humble as desperate need can be. There is one misstep here: "So Gone (What My Mind Says)" didn't require Paul Wall's tired, generic, boastful rapping to work. That said, the rhythm collision with human beatbox Doug E. Fresh on "All Cried Out Redux," complete with ragtime piano sample, is a novelty number that works. After the album's first third, it's all Scott, and (mostly) all sublime. The sparsely produced "Quick" (produced by Wayne Campbell) records the heartbreak in the brief relationship that produced her son. "Making You Wait" is another self-determination anthem that addresses romance, with spacious Rhodes and synth strings weaving beats together. Scott lays down the spoken word "Womanifesto" that recalls the poetry of her early career, just before the steamy, sexual "Rolling Hills" touches on jazz, blues, and late-'70s soul with effortless ease to close it. On The Light of the Sun, Scott sounds more in control than ever; her spoken and sung phrasing (now a trademark), songwriting, and production instincts are all solid. This is 21st century Philly soul at its best. ~ Thom Jurek
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$12.99

R&B - Released July 24, 2015 | Blues Babe Records - Atlantic

Hi-Res
After the 2011 album The Light of the Sun, Jill Scott advanced her acting career with roles in Steel Magnolias, Baggage Claim, and With This Ring. She also transferred her Blues Babe label from Warner Bros. to Atlantic and worked on her fifth proper studio album. A month ahead of its release, just after the second single reached the public, Hidden Beach just happened to issue Golden Moments, a compilation of highlights from Scott's "Words and Sounds" era. Should there be a second Jill Scott anthology, several cuts from Woman would make for obvious selections. The early singles -- a wailing update of Jerry Ragovoy's deep gospel-soul composition "You Don't Know Nothing About Love" and the relaxed breakbeat-propelled resignation of "Fool's Gold" -- are among the high points. Third single "Closure," produced by David Banner and Andre "Dre" Harris with references to Curtis Mayfield and Larry Graham, is among Scott's funkiest and funniest songs. The way she dismisses a lover -- she addresses him like a pet -- should be as remembered as any given line from "Gettin' in the Way." Other standouts are the result of smart pairings with younger talent. For the tranquil ballads "Lighthouse" and "Cruisin'," Scott teams up with fellow Philadelphian Andrew Wansel, the son of Dexter Wansel, while the 9th Wonder-produced "Beautiful Love," full of snaking keyboard lines, is a duet with BJ the Chicago Kid, too fine to be placed last on an hourlong album. Woman is so varied that it resembles a compilation itself, albeit one that's scattered in both sound and quality. More than any other Jill Scott album -- each one is either nearly or well over an hour in length -- its impact would likely deepen with some trimming and resequencing. Nonetheless, there's enough high-quality content to sustain Scott's status as one of the most unique and powerful voices in R&B. ~ Andy Kellman
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R&B - Released July 24, 2015 | Blues Babe Records - Atlantic

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R&B - Released July 18, 2000 | Hidden Beach Records

Though start-up label Hidden Beach and its manufacturer/distributor Sony may have been hoping for another Lauryn Hill in this eloquent young African-American from a Middle Atlantic state, Jill Scott turns out to be something of a hip-hop Patti Smith, a street poet who, on her first album, hasn't quite made the transition from spoken word performances to music, despite an excellent singing voice. With any luck, she will retain her sense of the power of words, since the best parts of this album are the ones when she lets fly, drunk on her verbal virtuosity. Producer Jeff Townes (of DJ Jazzy Jeff and the Fresh Prince fame) and his team of associates from the A Touch of Jazz production company set up sympathetic musical backgrounds for Scott that support her without requiring her to fit her spoken and sung excursions into strict meter. That gives her range to pursue her interests, which include a strong sense of her north Philadelphia neighborhood and such idiosyncratic concerns as food, with many meals listed in detail. But the album has a story to tell, and for the most part it is a love story. Scott describes a relationship from many different angles, including an encounter with her boyfriend's ex in a super market ("Exclusively") and her warnings to that girl (or some other) to stay away ("Gettin' in the Way"). She also breaks painfully from an old boyfriend in favor of the new one ("I Think It's Better"), but mostly she celebrates the relationship ("A Long Walk," "He Loves Me (Lyzel in E Flat)," "It's Love," "The Way"). But with "Honey Molasses," things turn sour, and on "Love Rain" and "Slowly Surely," she frees herself, concluding that "One Is the Magic #" and toward the end of the album moving on to social concerns with "Watching Me" and "Brotha." This narrative structure gives Scott ample room to express a variety of emotions and to display her "verbal elation." Like many poets, she sometimes delights in a torrent of words for their own sake, but it's hard to fault her when the result is such a fully articulated world view. There is no existing slot in R&B/hip-hop into which this album fits, which only means a new one will have to be created. (The CD marks a new complexity in the use of bonus and hidden tracks. After the 17th track, "Show Me," there are 26 four-second blank tracks, followed by a 44th track, the bonus song, "Try." One minute after this song ends, there is a hidden selection, an alternate version of "Love Rain" that features Mos Def.) ~ William Ruhlmann
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R&B - Released January 30, 2007 | Hidden Beach Records

R&B - Released April 29, 2015 | Blues Babe Records - Atlantic

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R&B - Released April 26, 2011 | Blues Babe Records

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R&B - Released August 31, 2004 | Hidden Beach Records

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R&B - Released November 20, 2001 | Hidden Beach Records

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R&B - Released September 28, 2018 | Hidden Beach Records

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Soul - Released August 29, 2011 | Hidden Beach Records (US)

Booklet
After a host of successful albums and numerous singles, singer, songwriter, author, and actress Jill Scott jumped from Hidden Beach to Warner Bros to release her stellar Light of the Sun album in June, 2011. While she was recording, her former label initiated a lawsuit claiming that she owed them three albums. The suit was settled quietly, with neither party commenting on the outcome. Apparently, what Hidden Beach received in the deal was the right to issue The Original Jill Scott from the Vault, Vol. 1, released hot on the heels of the number one single from Light of the Sun, “So in Love," which spent eight weeks at number one on Billboard's Urban chart, and the follow-up, "So Gone (What My Mind Says),” with Paul Wall. By and large, From the Vaults recordings usually consist of dead dogs, outtakes, demos, or material regarded as substandard. Not so here. Many of these tracks are finished masters, and virtually everything will delight hardcore Scott fans. The album contains a dozen tracks showcasing Scott in excellent voice, collaborating with many of the producers who helped to establish her name. The material ranges from a piano mix of "The Light" with Dre & Vidal and the slippery meld of neo-soul and hip-hop on "I Don't Know (I Gotta Have You)" produced by Ivan Barias, to a stellar, funky, but reverent cover of Bill Withers' "Lovely Day," produced by Jazzy Jeff, with an excellent string and horn chart just behind the beats. "Wake Up Baby," with Ronald "P-Nutt" Frost, is an old-school soul tune, layered with tasty guitar and steady, laid-back nocturnal beats, and an infectious melody. It's a production demo, but a final mix couldn't have been much different. Another production demo, "Running Away" (with a scratch vocal that becomes a live one), also allows the flow of studio sound to come through, making for a fascinating aural peek of Scott at work. Certainly, The Original Jill Scott from the Vault, Vol. 1 is a fan's collection; that said, it doesn't diminish Scott's reputation or come off as a label rip-off. Instead, it enhances the listener's idea of her perfectionist work ethic. It's not only listenable as an "in process" document, but offers a slew of tracks in various stages that are simply a pleasure to listen to. ~ Thom Jurek
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R&B - Released August 30, 2011 | Hidden Beach Records (US)

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Dance - Released June 26, 2012 | Hidden Beach Records (US)

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R&B - Released November 20, 2001 | Hidden Beach Records

House - Released August 8, 2016 | T's Box

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R&B - Released September 25, 2007 | Hidden Beach Records

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R&B - Released February 5, 2008 | Hidden Beach Records

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R&B - Released April 12, 2011 | Hidden Beach Records (US)

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R&B - Released November 20, 2001 | Hidden Beach Records