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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released June 9, 2017 | Cubevision JV New Agreements

Booklet
If Ice Cube's debut was a shocking attack that proved the N.W.A legacy would be stronger divided, his sophomore effort was a new kind of superstar pulling off the miraculous, a follow-up that equals its classic predecessor and tops it in some people's books. With a million copies of Death Certificate preordered, Cube was no longer the rock critics' darling. A million people listening was dangerous, especially since he was now slithering his influence into the suburbs. If the black rage didn't get you, the misogyny of "I'm gonna do my thing, with your daughter" probably would. Here, one of rap's greatest storytellers is able to draw hatred in under a minute with the short and direct "Black Korea," an angry protest song concerning Korean grocers that got him dubbed "racist" and "Ice KKKube" by some. The track is an extreme representation of how a much sharper and cutting this album is when compared with his debut, and even though the intro announces the full-length is divided into a "Death Side" and "Life Side," both are equally bleak. With the CD format, the two sides are indistinguishable and run over the listener with fast tales of drug dealing, drive-by shootings, and women who go from "Ms. Thing to Ms. Gonorrhea." This would be numbing if it weren't for the rapper's amazing lyrics, ground-shaking delivery, and insight like when "A Bird in the Hand" deals with the irony of selling crap to buy diapers ("Gotta serve you food that might give you cancer/Cuz my son doesn't take no for answer"). A bit of sweet relief comes with the brightness of the great single "Steady Mobbin'" and with the nostalgia and slow tempo of "Doing Dumb Shit." "True to the Game" ("Ain't that a bitch/They hate to see a young nigga rich") is arguably the quintessential Cube track and if all this weren't enough already, the N.W.A diss "No Vaseline" hangs off the album like a crowd-pleasing, Brick-sampling encore. Although next year's Predator would be a bigger hit, Death Certificate brings to a close the man's trilogy of perfect albums that began with N.W.A's Compton and explodes into a supernova right here. © David Jeffries /TiVo
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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released December 7, 2018 | Cubevision JV New Agreements

Booklet
O’Shea Jackson aka Ice Cube likes to remind us who the real OG is. The last time was in 2010 with the album I Am The West which ultimately wasn’t a huge success, but things have changed since then. Already in 2015, the biopic Straight Outta Compton rekindled the flame for his former group N.W.A. among the newer generation. Then a certain Donald Trump moved into the White House. Meanwhile, Ice Cube had been focusing exclusively on Hollywood films (Rampart, 21 Jump Street, Ride Along 1 and 2, Barbershop The Next Cut, xXx Reactivated and Fist Fight) although they hardly gave the likes of Citizen Kane a run for its money. He also launched BIG3, his 3-on-3 basketball league featuring old NBA stars. You would think that hip hop has become just a vague memory for him, but Everythangs Corrupt is proof to the contrary. Right from outset with the single Arrest The President he plays the raging pitbull against the man currently living at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue in Washington. His voice is certainly no longer as aggressive as in his holy trinity of the early ‘90s (AmeriKKKa’s Most Wanted, Death Certificate and The Predator) but the ex N.W.A. member has kept his old school flow as soulful as ever, particularly in Streets Shed Tears and the cheeky Can You Dig It?. This time, there are no trap sounds, nor does it feature a whole load of young people to appeal to under-18s. Ice Cube even has one 50-year-old guest, the great Too $hort, on Ain’t Got No Haters. Obviously, with it’s 20th century vibe, this tenth album is light-years away from the sounds of XXXTentacion or Earl Sweatshirt. But by sticking to what he knows and accepting his age and his legacy, Cube has produced an album that in no way suggests it’s time to retire. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Hip-Hop/Rap - Released December 7, 2018 | Cubevision JV New Agreements

Booklet
Ice Cube's first album in eight years, Everythangs Corrupt arrives six years after it was intended to. Despite that, much of the material was clearly inspired by the political rise of Donald Trump, as well as its causes and effects, targeted most explicitly on "Arrest the President." Cube tempers all the fiery invective with a surplus of punchlines and some of his funkiest material, highlighted by "That New Funkadelic." Joined only by Too Short, with whom he rides on the celebratory veterans' anthem "Ain't Got No Haters," Cube proves throughout that he has lost none of his edge. © TiVo