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Reggae - Released March 15, 2010 | Trojan Records

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Reggae - Released February 10, 2012 | VP

Though he kind of shot himself in the foot by deriving his stage name so obviously from that of the legendary U-Roy, Roy Reid nevertheless went on to become one of the most influential reggae DJs (or rappers) of the 1970s, arguably the classical period of his chosen specialty. He was a hugely popular feature of King Tubby's Hi-Fi sound system, and recorded for many of the top producers of the day, most notably Bunny Lee, Gussie Clarke, and Lee "Scratch" Perry. He also cut 11 tracks for a young producer named Winston Holness, aka Niney the Observer. All of those tracks were compiled onto a single CD for inclusion in the VP label's excellent Deep Roots Observer Style box set, and was subsequently released separately on vinyl as well. The rhythms over which he chats are mostly derived from the hit records Holness was making with Dennis Brown at the time; in fact, the "Wolves & Leopards" rhythm shows up twice here, once on the very fine "Step On the Dragon," then again on "Sister Maggie Breast." The "Up Park Camp" rhythm makes an inevitable appearance as well, supporting an excellent toast on "Point Blank Observer Style." But the most enjoyable entry comes right near the end, with "Jah Is My Light/Wicked Eat Dirt," a showcase track on which Leroy Smart sings, and which segues immediately into a dub mix over which I-Roy toasts in psalm-like mode. Brilliant. © Rick Anderson /TiVo
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Reggae - Released December 31, 1992 | Gorgon Records

Like most Jamaican stars, I-Roy was prolific to the point of deluging the market with releases, but unlike many other artists, most of his work during the apex of his career was all of decidedly high caliber. A box set is desperately needed to round up the best of his work during the '70s, but as that's unlikely, Don't Check Me With No Lightweight Stuff is an excellent start. The title, incidentally, is taken from a spoken line in the intro to "Look a Boom," and is appropriate, as the set rounds up 16 heavy-hitting numbers. The collection draws exclusively from 1972-1975, the period between his breakthrough in Jamaica and his inking a deal with Virgin Records. Across this three-year period, I-Roy unleashed scores of singles, self-producing some while also cutting records for virtually every producer on the island. However, this is by no means a greatest-hits collection, as a number of the DJ's biggest smashes, "Black Man Time," "Monkey Fashion," and "Tripe Girl," are missing. However, you do get "Buck and the Preacher," an equal chart-buster, the seminal "Sidewalk Killer," and "Holy Satta," his Psalm-filled version of the Abyssinians' masterpiece, "Satta Massa Gana." One of I-Roy's many fortes was his thematic diversity, and his toasts ranged from Rasta-fired preaching inspired by the Psalms, strong societal messages, and chatty pieces on more popular concerns to sharp, rousing cuts aimed at firing up the crowds at the sound systems. This set showcases his versatility, his excitement at the latest black films ("Superfly" and the aforementioned "Buck and the Preacher"), keenness for literacy ("Sound Education"), condemnations of anti-social behavior ("Noisy Place" and "Hot Stuff"), and warnings to the wicked ("Double Warning" and "Hospital Trolley"). The DJ pays his respects to saxophonist Tommy McCook on "Sidewalk Killer," and offers comfort to a boxing great on the superb "Don't Get Weary Joe Frazier." Every one of the numbers boasts a superb musical accompaniment, all skillfully reworking rhythms into sizzling mixes that provide the perfect template for I-Roy's toasts. As one has come to gratefully expect from the Blood & Fire label, the album includes a sumptuous booklet, with a bio written from an interview with the late DJ, plus information on each track. By far, Don't Check Me is the best collection of the artist currently available. © Jo-Ann Greene /TiVo
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Reggae - Released October 15, 2013 | Alexander Music Group

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World - Released March 28, 2006 | Charly Records

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Ska & Rocksteady - Released August 4, 2014 | Burning Girl Releases

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Reggae - Released January 1, 2000 | Virgin Records

Not as even as predecessors like Truths and Rights, but has some good moments. There's more than enough examples of I Roy's elementaryish rhymes; kids could jump rope to "Sister Nelly" and "Tiddele Bop," two humorous numbers that I Roy must have spent hours on in order to get the rhymes tight. The reading level of his lyrics rises on "Move Up Rasta Man," "Jordan River," and "Peace in the City," the first two in particular show advance poetic skills. A strong reggae skank, provided by guitarist Earl "Chinna" Smith, underlines every track. Far from classic, but one fans will want in their collection. © Andrew Hamilton /TiVo
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Reggae - Released January 20, 2015 | Gorgon Records

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Reggae - Released March 21, 2011 | Charly Records

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Dub - Released September 30, 2016 | Justice

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Reggae - Released January 25, 2019 | Gorgon Recordings

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Reggae - Released April 17, 2012 | Attack

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Reggae - Released January 16, 2012 | Attack

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Reggae - Released August 15, 2012 | Culture Town

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Reggae - Released February 16, 2012 | Attack

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Reggae - Released January 16, 2012 | Attack

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Reggae - Released January 16, 2012 | Attack

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Reggae - Released January 16, 2012 | Attack

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Dub - Released February 20, 2014 | Authentic Jamaican Music

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Reggae - Released December 10, 2011 | Original Jamaican Music