Similar artists

Albums

$12.99

Rap/Hip-Hop - Released October 13, 2017 | Guwop Enterprises - Atlantic

$12.99

Rap/Hip-Hop - Released December 7, 2018 | Guwop Enterprises - Atlantic

There is just under one year between Evil Genius and Gucci Mane’s last album El Gato: The Human Glacier. Yes, really, one year. If this were any other artist we wouldn’t think anything of it, but Gucci Mane fans are used to the Atlanta rapper releasing albums at a rate of knots. Since his release from prison in May 2016, Gucci Mane has released four studio albums, two mixtapes and an EP (not including this release). And he hasn’t only been working at this pace since his release from prison, ever since 2005 with the release of his debut album Trap House he has been pumping out albums like nobody’s business, Evil Genius going down as his thirteenth studio album. With almost thirty credited producers, Gucci Mane’s latest album sticks to the trap style that he was key in shaping. Apart from one or two tracks there aren’t many surprises here, Wake Up in the Sky with Bruno Mars and Kodak Black being one of these exceptions bringing a slight soul twist to the album. Despite the generous (by Gucci Mane’s standards) amount of time he gave himself to conceive this album, it doesn’t really stand out from the crowd. If you’re not fussed about innovation and you just want to hear some classic Gucci, this album ticks both boxes with trap anthems such as Off the Boat and Just Like It (featuring 21 Savage) which glamourize a criminal lifestyle. If you were expecting something fresh and new after the rapper’s year long silence then you may be disappointed. As well as the previously mentioned collaborators, this record includes appearances from Quavo, Migos and Lil Skies amongst others. Although Gucci Mane seems to have settled down a bit in his personal life (now married to Keyshia Ka’oir), the old Gucci still seems to be handling the musical side of things. And why not? It’s by being the old Gucci that he became one of the most influential rappers of his time. © Euan Decourt/Qobuz
$0.99

Rap/Hip-Hop - Released September 14, 2018 | Guwop Enterprises - Atlantic

$12.99

Rap/Hip-Hop - Released December 22, 2017 | Guwop Enterprises - Atlantic

It would be an understatement to call Gucci Mane prolific. Since he left prison in 2016, this grand-master of Atlanta rap, who could easily be the most influential rapper of the last ten years, has brought out three official studio albums, two mixtapes, an EP and a successful autobiography, and he has collaborated with all the superstars of rap and pop (from Migos to N.E.R.D by way of Selena Gomez). We are now used to his insane work schedule (which he has kept up since 2005!), but we have not seen such consistency for a long time. Having made the leap from being the rapper's rapper to being a global popstar, Radric Davis isn't resting on his laurels. His twelfth album, El Gato: The Human Glacier, recorded over two days with the trusty Southside working on the production with no outside assistance, comes only months after the immense commercial success of Mr Davisand its plethora of guests. This is at once a return to the fundamentals of this dadaist, faintly absurd, patchworked street rap, which has made Gucci a legend but also a fine rejoinder to the whispered suggestion that the Atlanta sound is getting stale these days. In eleven tracks and a little more than half an hour, Southside and Guwop manage to update the trap operating system, providing several very high-quality productions (the winning TYT and Sea Sick and the great outro in particular will reward repeated listenings). Hats off. © DB/Qobuz
$1.49

Rap/Hip-Hop - Released August 9, 2018 | Guwop Enterprises - Atlantic

$12.99

Rap/Hip-Hop - Released July 22, 2016 | Guwop Enterprises - Atlantic

After three years behind bars, Atlanta rapper Gucci Mane emerged to a scene that had transformed in his absence. With the mainstreaming of trap music and the rise of mushy-mouthed lyrical slurring, he needed to remind the world of his presence. On Everybody Looking, Gucci Mane reasserted his position as a pioneer of the subgenre. Newly sober and slimmed down, Gucci purged years of pent-up emotion over 14 hungry tracks, which were recorded in less than a week. Despite the consistent flow of mixtapes that he somehow issued while in prison, Everybody Looking is the true follow-up to 2011's The Return of Mr. Zone 6, with hypnotic production courtesy of familiar faces Mike Will Made-It and Zaytoven. The beats are meaty and the bars packed with some of Gucci's most boastful and defiant lyrics. From the opening "No Sleep" -- where he proclaims "I can't even sleep I got so much to say!" before laying into the feds, cops, and district attorney who put him away -- it's apparent that Gucci is working through his bitterness, but he doesn't waste too much time dwelling on that part of his past. Instead, he makes sure to remind the youngsters of his own legacy in the game ("All My Children" being the clearest salvo). On "Guwop Home," he even enlists spiritual spawn Young Thug on a master-apprentice duet. Kanye West drops in on vulgar highlight "Pussy Print" while Drake -- who also owes a lot to Gucci -- lends his nasally flow to "Back on Road." Unlike career highlight The State vs. Radric Davis, Everybody Looking doesn't rely on excessive guest spots. Aside from the three high-profile appearances, everything else here is Gucci. The booming "Waybach," the menacing "Pop Music," and the defiant "Richest Nigga in the Room" are all highlights, but as far as emotional payoff, "1st Day Out That Feds" is the big winner. The first song he recorded after his release on May 26, 2016, "1st Day" reflects on the wave of changes and emotions in his post-incarceration life. He raps, "I did some things to some people that was downright evil/Is it karma coming back to me, so much drama/My own mama turned her back on me, and that's my mama!" This introspection cuts through the typical boasting and call-outs, providing insight into Gucci's state of mind. It's cathartic, effective, and one of the better songs in his catalog. By the end of this comeback, he plants his flag firmly with the declaration that he is a "T-R-A-P-G-O-D." It's hard to argue the claim, as Everybody Looking is one of the best examples of Gucci Mane's contributions to rap in his highly prolific catalog. ~ Neil Z. Yeung
$12.99

Rap/Hip-Hop - Released May 27, 2017 | Guwop Enterprises - Atlantic

$1.49

Rap/Hip-Hop - Released August 19, 2017 | Guwop Enterprises - Atlantic

$3.99

Rap/Hip-Hop - Released September 13, 2005 | Big Cat

$12.99

Rap/Hip-Hop - Released December 17, 2016 | Guwop Enterprises - Atlantic

Prolific trap icon Gucci Mane ended an eventful 2016 with his third solo LP of the year, The Return of East Atlanta Santa. His tenth studio effort overall, the album is the third installment in Guwop's East Atlanta Santa series and features production from familiar faces like Metro Boomin, Zaytoven, Mike WiLL Made It, and more. Drake, Bryson Tiller, and Travis Scott also join Gucci Claus on a trio of singles. The Return of East Atlanta Santa debuted at 16 on the Billboard 200 and in the Top Ten of the R&B/hip-hop chart. ~ Neil Z. Yeung
$4.99

Rap/Hip-Hop - Released June 9, 2015 | RBC Records

$1.49

Rap/Hip-Hop - Released September 13, 2017 | Guwop Enterprises - Atlantic

$1.49

Rap/Hip-Hop - Released November 26, 2016 | Guwop Enterprises - Atlantic

$1.49

Rap/Hip-Hop - Released March 3, 2018 | Guwop Enterprises - Atlantic

$11.99

Rap/Hip-Hop - Released May 24, 2005 | Big Cat

For Atlanta MC Gucci Mane, the road to the release of his debut, TRAP HOUSE, was, to say the least, a bit bizarre. First there was a dispute over the underground hit "Icy," a collaboration with Young Jeezy of Boyz N Da Hood, with Gucci denying Def Jam the rights to put the track on the latter's debut record, which led to an exchange of accusatory mixtape tracks. Then, the week before TRAP HOUSE dropped, Gucci Mane found himself surrendering to murder charges. Controversy has rarely hurt record sales, but the album ultimately stands or falls on the strength of Mane's rap skills. To that effect, he is a charismatic rapper who rhymes with an agreeable rawness about rising from life on the streets. There is no smoke-and-mirrors obfuscation to his style; "Lawnmower Man" simply speaks of his prowess, "Black Tees" plainly, playfully swipes at the Dem Franchize Boyz hit "White Tees." The controversial "Icy" employs an electronic beat as spare as Mane's style for an effective paean to the streets. Across all the tracks, Gucci Mane's breezy demeanor contrasts his hard lyrics for a capable debut.
$1.49

Rap/Hip-Hop - Released April 15, 2017 | Guwop Enterprises - Atlantic

Rap/Hip-Hop - Released October 15, 2016 | Guwop Enterprises - Atlantic

Download not available
Just months after the release of his triumphant post-prison comeback, Everybody Looking, the ever-prolific Gucci Mane returned with Woptober. Guwop's tenth official album is -- as the solid-ice bust on the album cover suggests -- an icy-cold affair. Proving that incarceration couldn't slow him down, the 13 tracks are packed with typical boasts, all come-at-me defiance and bravado. Since his catalog can be daunting for the casual listener -- dozens of mixtapes were issued during his two years behind bars alone -- it's worth pointing out the highlights. "Bling Blaww Burr" menaces with horror movie production courtesy of Metro Boomin and a fearsome turn from Young Dolph. The only other guest on Woptober is Rick Ross, whose booming delivery elevates the catchy single "Money Machine." Haunted by money, drugs, and women, the two kings sound almost weary with power. Gucci's frequent collaborator Zaytoven lends his trademark production to a handful of tracks, the best of which is the popping "Icy Lil Bitch." Beside the typical themes commonly found on a Gucci Mane record, "Addicted" stands out for its startling self-reflection. Like a peek into his diary, "Addicted" is a confessional that tackles a litany of sins: addiction, sex, diamonds, guns, gambling, cars, you name it. As he admits to a laundry list of vices, he's also atoning, taking responsibility for everything he's done wrong. It's a nice change of pace for the trap master. When the required brags and posturing die down, this honesty is refreshing and moving. When wading through his massive repertoire, this is the standout that makes Woptober worth it. ~ Neil Z. Yeung
$1.49

Rap/Hip-Hop - Released February 25, 2017 | Guwop Enterprises - Atlantic

$1.49

Rap/Hip-Hop - Released December 1, 2018 | Guwop Enterprises - Atlantic

$4.99

Rap/Hip-Hop - Released December 11, 2015 | RBC Records

News feed Prev. Next