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Jazz - Released January 1, 2013 | Blue Note (BLU)

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography - Hi-Res Audio
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1961 | EMI Music Special Markets

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Bandes originales de films - Released January 1, 2003 | Blue Note Records

The Final Comedown was Blue Note's first film soundtrack and a departure for both the label and Grant Green. True, many of Green's sessions from this period dipped into funk and R&B, but most of the tracks heard here are pensive mood pieces, conceived as the backing tracks to the blaxploitation film of the same name. As can be expected, there are a handful of cuts -- "Past, Present and Future," "Slight Fear and Terror," "Battle Scene" -- featuring things like staccato horn punches, dramatic tympani, and little in the way of instrumental soloing -- standard fare for the genre. Others, like the fantastic title track, showcase Green in a setting much more akin to his previous funk dates (Alive, etc.). Like any film score, The Final Comedown shifts moods as often as it revisits themes, so one should expect to hear a wide variety of styles held together by only a few common motifs. The most puzzling thing about this release, perhaps, is the fact that it was credited to Green at all. Wade Marcus composed and conducted every track and at least a few of them feature Green in nothing more than a supporting role. Recommended for fans of blaxploitation soundtracks and early-'70s jazz-funk. ~ Brandon Burke
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Jazz - Released May 21, 1971 | CM BLUE NOTE (A92)

Grant Green's early-'70s recordings for Blue Note are continually attacked by jazz critics for being slick, overly commercial sessions that leaned closer to contemporary pop and R&B than hard bop or soul jazz. There's no denying that Green, like many of his Blue Note contemporaries, did choose a commercial path in the early '70s, but there were some virtues to these records, and Visions in particular. Often, these albums were distinguished by hot, funky workouts in the vein of Sly Stone or James Brown, but that's not the case here. On Visions, the guitarist crafted a set of appealingly melodic, lightly funky pop-jazz, concentrating on pop hits like "Does Anybody Really Know What Time It Is," "Love On a Two Way Street," "We've Only Just Begun," and "Never Can Say Goodbye." Supported by minor-league players, Green nevertheless turns in an elegant and dignified performance -- after stating the melody on each song, he contributes typically graceful, memorable solos. Simply put, he sounds fresh, and his playing here is the best it has been since 1965's His Majesty, King Funk. Ultimately, Visions is a bit laid-back, and the electric piano-heavy arrangements are a little dated, but Grant Green never made a commercial pop-jazz album as appealing and satisfying as Visions. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Jazz - Released December 7, 1979 | CM BLUE NOTE (A92)

This is an album of real beauty and synergy between Green and pianist Sonny Clark, who along with Sam Jones on bass and Louis Hayes on drums rounds out the quartet. Green, an expert with standards, offers "Moon River," "On Green Dolphin Street," and "Count Every Star." This album was also released on The Complete Blue Note Recordings of Grant Green and Sonny Clark. ~ Michael Erlewine
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Jazz - Released April 11, 1980 | CM BLUE NOTE (A92)

This is a great album with the classic synergy of Green and pianist Sonny Clark, who along with Sam Jones on bass and Art Blakey complete the quartet. This album was also released on The Complete Blue Note Recordings of Grant Green and Sonny Clark. Just classic Green. ~ Michael Erlewine
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Jazz - Released February 2, 1980 | CM BLUE NOTE (A92)

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Jazz - Released September 14, 1965 | Verve Reissues

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Jazz - Released December 31, 1966 | Savoy

Recorded for Muse Records in 1967 as Grant Green was on an extended recording hiatus -- it was his only record between 1965's His Majesty, King Funk, his only album for Verve, and 1969's Carryin' On, his return to Blue Note -- Iron City actually captures the guitarist in fine form, jamming on six blues and R&B numbers with his longtime cohorts, organist Big John Patton and drummer Ben Dixon. The trio members had long ago perfected their interplay, and they just cook on Iron City, working a hot groove on each song. Even the slow blues "Motherless Child" has a distinct swing in its backbeat, but most of the album finds the trio tearing through uptempo grooves with a vengeance. Green's playing is a bit busier than normal and he solos far more often than Patton, who lays back through most of the album, providing infectious vamps and lead lines. The two styles mesh perfectly with Dixon's deft drumming, resulting in a fine, overlooked date that showcases some of Green's hottest, bluesiest playing. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Jazz - Released October 10, 1970 | EMI Music Japan Inc.

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Jazz - Released July 12, 1972 | CM BLUE NOTE (A92)

A Blue Note date with a large group including about horns, reeds, woodwinds, vibes, et al. Consists of standards and even a medley. This is not the old Grant Green. ~ Michael Erlewine
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Jazz - Released August 21, 2007 | Essential Media Group

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Jazz - Released January 1, 2007 | Blue Note Records

As part of Blue Note's Finest in Jazz series, guitarist Grant Green is spotlighted on six tracks recorded between 1969 and 1971, along with his first release for the label, "Miss Ann's Tempo," in 1961. This set is aimed at the casual funk and acid jazz fan, which is the reason his earlier hard bop material is substituted with later groove tracks like "California Green," "Cantaloupe Woman," and "Down Here on the Ground" (which was sampled by A Tribe Called Quest for their track "Vibes and Stuff"). These performances provide a decent snapshot of the guitarist's later recordings at a mid-line price. ~ Al Campbell
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Jazz - Released May 12, 2009 | Jukebox Entertainment

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Jazz - Released January 1, 1961 | EMI Music Special Markets

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Jazz - Released November 20, 2012 | UPTOWN JAZZ

Grant Green's star rose after his signing to Blue Note in 1960, though he appeared as a sideman on several releases during the 1950s. These previously unissued live recordings, made in 1959 and 1960 at the Holy Barbarian Coffee House in St. Louis, document some of his earliest work. Although the music wasn't taped professionally, the sound is quite good, with several extended performances. The St. Louis native is joined by tenor saxophonist Bob Graf (a former Woody Herman sideman who had returned to his hometown), the somewhat obscure organist Sam Lazar, and drummer Chauncey Williams, though none of the three have very large discographies. Graf's robust solo in the midtempo rendition of the standard "There Will Never Be Another You" is an immediate high point for him, though it is Green's clean, spacious solo that leaves a lasting impression, blending bop and a bluesy air, even humorously quoting from Bizet's opera Carmen. Graf's big tone is on display in the quartet's treatment of "Groovin' High" as he masters some tricky runs, followed by Green's intricate, bluesy solo. Graf doesn't try to clone John Coltrane in the band's take of "Blue Train," taking a lighter approach and detouring into a lighter setting, while Lazar's loud bursts back yet another fine Green solo, though the amateur poetry read over the ending of the song by Pete Simpson quickly grows tedious. Liner note author Bob Blumenthal discusses the confusion over the titles to three original tracks in great detail. "The Holy Barbarian Blues" is a rollicking uptempo blues, while "Caramu (Blue Caribou)" has a funky swagger. Graf dives headfirst into Lazar's "Deep" with some of his grittiest playing, while Green's elaborate bop lines foreshadow the recognition he would begin to achieve within a few short years. Like many Uptown releases, much care has been given to creating a booklet with detailed period photographs, newspaper clippings, and historical background about the long-shuttered club. This historic find should have great appeal to fans of Grant Green. ~ Ken Dryden