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Film Soundtracks - Released November 8, 2019 | Graham Coxon

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Film Soundtracks - Released January 26, 2018 | Graham Coxon

Born in West Germany in 1969, Graham Coxon came to fame as the guitarist in Blur. But in moving from pop to music for moving pictures, Coxon has not lost one bit of his predilection for song. And so this soundtrack contains impressive homages to country, rock and folk songs from the 70s, like Angry Me and the ballad Saturday Night. Adapted from a graphic novel by Charles Forsman, this series, which came out on Netflix in 2017, jars audiences with its humorous tale of a psychopathic teenager. Despite this unusual tone, there is no hint of a pastiche in Graham Coxon's work. Everything in his music testifies to his sincere love of the music of the 1970s. ©NM/Qobuz
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Film Soundtracks - Released November 4, 2019 | Graham Coxon

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Folk/Americana - Released May 11, 2009 | Transgressive Records

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Rock - Released March 13, 2006 | Parlophone UK

Since Graham Coxon began his solo career with deliberate obscurist, alienating indie rock, it was easy to miss his transition back to the pop skills that he extravagantly displayed as the guitarist for Blur, but 2004's Happiness in Magazines was a full-bodied, full-throttle pronouncement that he had returned to the music that made his mark -- and it was damn good too, filled with tight pop songwriting and barbed-wire guitar. Its 2006 follow-up Love Travels at Illegal Speeds betters it in every respect, upping the ante in both its sound and songs. Coxon's writing is taut and precise. Where his earlier solo records felt a little haphazard, as if he was trying to rein in his natural talent for hooks, he lets them accumulate here and lets them build; consequently, this is music that has a bright immediate impact in its tunefulness, but repetition reveals how well-constructed it is. And those repeated listens don't dull the appeal of Love Travels at Illegal Speeds. Much of this is taut, tantalizing pop -- grounded in the melodicism of British Invasion but played with the nervy precision of art-punk -- and while Coxon doesn't work with much more than guitars, bass, drums and harmonies, he finds a variety of lively rhythms and unpredictable textures that not only make this sound fresh, but reveals new sounds upon repeated place. Coxon's ambitions on Love Travels at Illegal Speeds may not be grand -- he has simply made a punky pop album (which is different than punk-pop) -- but his execution is exceptional, which makes this a very appealing album. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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Rock - Released May 5, 2006 | Parlophone UK

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Rock - Released August 10, 1998 | Parlophone UK

Graham Coxon had often said he felt the loose, jagged, American-indie sound of Blur's self-titled album was "his" more so than the band's other members -- The Sky Is Too High, released between Blur and its follow-up, 13, lends credence to this statement. Most of the record is drum-less, consisting of oddly slanted constructions of electric and acoustic guitars in Coxon's trademark style (quirky, sloppy riffs and arpeggios shooting all over the fretboard) -- the real magic is the way this approach works so perfectly on strange minimal ballads like "In a Salty Sea" and "Waiting," the sorts of constructions Blur shied away from until their self-titled release. The resulting songs are reminiscent of certain pre-Blur tracks (Modern Life Is Rubbish's "Miss America," most notably), but Coxon's low-fi, personal and decidedly non-pop approach makes this sound work as a little world unto itself, rather than a brief excursion on a thoroughly pop record. On the rare tracks where Coxon switches to a driving, noisy full-band arrangement, things are equally slanted and interesting -- since The Sky Is Too High is essentially a side project, and therefore tends to restrict itself to a small, bedroom quality, one has to wonder what a proper solo release from Coxon would sound like. © Nitsuh Abebe /TiVo
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Film Soundtracks - Released January 16, 2018 | Graham Coxon

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Rock - Released December 1, 2017 | Parlophone UK

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Rock - Released June 12, 2000 | Parlophone UK

What with Blur frontman Damon Albarn stealing much of the attention for his loud-mouth antics, it seemed only natural that Graham Coxon, Blur's lead guitarist, would break out on his own for a side project. His debut solo release, 1998's The Sky Is Too High, was sort of like a collection of journal entries featuring acoustic melancholy, off-key guitar explosions and country crooning. Like The Sky, the second album reveals Coxon's appreciation for American indie rock. Whereas the first solo effort was somewhat lo-fi and reminiscent of Lou Barlow, Golden D, which is named after the musical chord, focuses on rock -- the hard and fast variety -- and suggests Sonic Youth and Sex Pistols. Standouts include "Jamie Thomas," a trashy punk thrasher that tributes his favorite skateboarder; atmospheric noodlings on "Lake"; the quirky horn-driven "Oochy Woochy"; and two Mission Of Burma covers ("Fame and Fortune" and "That's When I Reach for My Revolver." Whereas Blur hired producer William Orbit (of Madonna fame) to bring out the band's delightfully sloppy side on its last album, 13, Coxon, who produced Golden D himself, masters messiness the au natural way -- by making the album sound almost exactly as it would live. This, in fact, leads to the most impressive element of Golden D -- that Coxon is solely responsible for everything you hear -- and see -- on the dozen-track album. He provided all the vocal and instrumental work (guitar and drums, mainly). He also released the album on his own label, Transcopic, and created the cover-art work -- a mess of colorful, cartoonish-looking albeit violent scribbles. © Amy Schroeder /TiVo
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Pop - Released August 13, 2004 | Parlophone UK

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Pop - Released October 20, 2006 | Parlophone UK

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Pop - Released October 13, 2006 | Parlophone UK

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Rock - Released July 14, 2006 | Parlophone UK

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Rock - Released July 14, 2006 | Parlophone UK

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Rock - Released May 5, 2006 | Parlophone UK

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Rock - Released May 5, 2006 | Parlophone UK

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Rock - Released February 24, 2006 | Parlophone UK

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Rock - Released February 24, 2006 | Parlophone UK

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Rock - Released February 24, 2006 | Parlophone UK