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Symphonic Poems - Released May 26, 2009 | Chandos

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 4 étoiles Classica - Hi-Res Audio
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Symphonic Music - Released January 1, 2006 | Chandos

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 4 étoiles du Monde de la Musique - Hi-Res Audio
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Symphonic Music - Released September 1, 2007 | Chandos

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 4 étoiles du Monde de la Musique - Hi-Res Audio
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Symphonic Poems - Released May 1, 2007 | Chandos

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - Hi-Res Audio
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Symphonic Poems - Released November 18, 2008 | Chandos

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - Hi-Res Audio
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Classical - Released June 4, 2013 | Chandos

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions Gramophone Editor's Choice - 4 étoiles Classica
The interwar Italian music of Alfredo Casella, highly eclectic in nature, has enjoyed a certain vogue, and the series of Casella recordings by the BBC Philharmonic under Gianandrea Noseda has been widely praised. The present release, covering a span of three decades and three different styles in Casella's career, may be optimal for those hoping to sample a single album. The most intriguing find here is the symphonic poem Italia, Op. 11, which shares with Richard Strauss' Aus Italien a lengthy quotation from the Neapolitan popular song Funiculi, Funiculà, and would seem to have been inspired by it. But Casella's work has an entirely different tone from the sunny Italian dream indulged in by Strauss. It might be called an anti-travelogue, with references to several rather grim Sicilian folk songs (the booklet notes by Gerald Larner are helpful here but not essential: the moods of the music hold up on their own) and Funiculi, Funiculà gathering a frenzied energy that may bring Ravel's La valse to mind. The Introduzione, Corale e Marzia, Op. 57, was completed in 1935 but reflects Casella's preoccupation with Stravinsky's music during the 1920s. The marquee work, the Sinfonia, Op. 63 (also known as the Symphony No. 3), is an odd mix, applying Stravinsky's neoclassicism to a patriotic idiom in the run-up to World War II. The effect is something like an Italian Copland, and probably Casella suffers from the comparison, although your mileage may vary. Noseda gets committed, enthusiastic performances from the workhorse musicians of the BBC Philharmonic Orchestra, and there are at the very least several worthwhile additions to the 20th century orchestral repertoire here. © TiVo
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Classical - Released May 1, 2012 | Chandos

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - 4 étoiles Classica
Italy's Alfredo Casella has been talked up as the great unknown composer of the first half of the 20th century. He was influenced by Debussy, Mahler, Schoenberg, and Stravinsky in turn, yet he mixed and matched elements of their styles with a distinctive formal imagination. Casella was largely responsible for the reintroduction of Vivaldi to the musical world, and some of the neo-classic music he composed later in his career had direct Baroque references. This album lacks that aspect of his work, but these three pieces, each made up of short chunks of music, probably offer an easier introduction to Casella than do the weightier symphonies. The Concerto for orchestra, loosely neo-classical, appeared in 1938 and thus lay between Hindemith's and Bartók's works with the same title. A notte alta (1921), with a solo piano part tracing a noctural meeting between two lovers, was likely inspired by Schoenberg's Verklärte Nacht. In between the two come the Symphonic Fragments from La Donna Serpente, a set of orchestral excerpts from a failed opera. The Concerto for Orchestra, with its combination of unusual movement forms and brilliant orchestration, is the strongest of the three works. Sample the middle movement, a passacaglia that blooms into a constantly evolving set of 14 variations. A notte alta, designated "Poema musicale per pianoforte ed orchestra," is evocatively handled by pianist Martin Roscoe, and the work of the BBC Philharmonic under the indefatigable Gianandrea Noseda is consistently strong. It's a little hard to tell where the personal artistic compulsion lies in Casella's music, but everything here is worth hearing. © TiVo
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Symphonic Music - Released January 26, 2010 | Chandos

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason - Hi-Res Audio
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Classical - Released February 21, 2020 | National Symphony Orchestra

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
It will be interesting to compare the Billy The Kid from this new recording – captured live in June 2019 – by Gianandrea Noseda, whose insatiable curiosity for international music (this is after all a seminal piece of American repertoire written by Copland in 1938) was evidenced by his magnificent collection of Italian music for Chandos, with the older version by Morton Gould for RCA in 1958. Less concerned with the narrative and evocative aspects of ballet, the Italian maestro conducts Billy The Kid like a grand symphonic suite, nonetheless relishing the marvellous originality the American composer employs in his orchestration. Familiar with the music of Central Europe, Gianandrea Noseda also presents a sleek and light (initial Allegro molto) version of Dvořák’s Ninth Symphony with beautiful polyphonic counterpoints at the head of his new orchestra, the National Symphony Orchestra in Washington. Some might say that the sound recording lacks definition, but you can only admire Noseda’s constantly fluid and flexible rhythm, vivacious and singing. This first release on the American orchestra’s label leaves you impatient and wanting more! © Pierre-Yves Lascar/Qobuz
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Classical - Released October 4, 2019 | LSO Live

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
Shostakovich at one point thought his Fourth Symphony was the best thing he’d ever written. Extravagant and challenging in equal measure, it’s a work of epic proportions, requiring over 100 musicians including large percussion and brass sections. Owing to Soviet censure, the work went unperformed for almost 30 years after it was completed, until in 1961 it was revealed as one of the significant milestones of the composer’s output, the work that solidified him as a master symphonist. © LSO Live
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Classical - Released June 1, 2006 | Chandos

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Symphonic Poems - Released August 1, 2005 | Chandos

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Classical - Released May 3, 2011 | Chandos

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The abundant concert works of Italian composer Nino Rota continue to surface in recordings, many on major labels. Doubtless this is partly because Rota carries marquee value from his association with the Godfather films, but his music, although surely a mixed bag, is often just plain fun. You can break it down into three general categories, which don't necessarily correspond to individual works but are heard in combination. First is the group of marvelously cinematic tunes that make this release of interest to the still-numerous fans of Rota's film music; the Concerto Soirée for piano and orchestra offers a generous selection. Second, Rota made various attempts to master styles from the straight classical sphere. He avoided modernist idioms, but the Symphony No. 3 in C major, composed in 1956, is a competent essay in French-style neo-classicism in its outer movements. Finally there are pieces that show a style that's distinctively Rota's, and these are the best of all. Sample the gorgeously lyrical but not all sentimental slow movement of the Symphony No. 3 (track 11) or the witty Divertimento concertante for double bass and orchestra, whose interplay between the solo instruments and the orchestral brasses reveals a humor different from the light melodies in Rota's film scores. Nothing here is groundbreaking, but conductor Gianandrea Noseda and the Filarmonica '900 del Teatro Regio, Turin, with Irish pianist Barry Douglas in the Concerto Soirée, deliver vigorous renditions in keeping with the spirit of the music. Recommended especially for film music fans. © TiVo
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Classical - Released November 13, 2015 | Chandos

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 4 étoiles Classica
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Symphonies - Released October 5, 2018 | LSO Live

Hi-Res Booklet Distinctions 5 de Diapason
Composed against a cataclysmic backdrop of Stalinist oppression and the Second World War, Shostakovich's Eighth Symphony is a deeply affecting poem of suffering. The composer described it as 'an attempt to reflect the terrible tragedy of war', and it contains some of the most terrifying music he ever wrote. Here, Gianandrea Noseda conducts the London Symphony Orchestra with intensity and understanding, allowing the music to tell its own story as it travels from darkness into light, yearning more for peace than for victory. One of the leading conductors of his generation, Gianandrea Noseda holds several high-profile international positions in addition to his role as Principal Guest Conductor of the London Symphony Orchestra, including Music Director of the National Symphony Orchestra in Washington DC. His previous releases on LSO Live include acclaimed interpretations of the Verdi Requiem and Britten War Requiem, and this recording follows the digital release of Shostakovich: Symphony No 5, which will receive a full release in October 2019 coupled with the composer's First Symphony. © harmonia mundi
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Classical - Released June 29, 2010 | Chandos

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Classical - Released September 3, 2013 | Chandos

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Violin Concertos - Released May 1, 2005 | Chandos

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Symphonic Music - Released June 30, 2009 | Chandos

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Symphonic Music - Released January 4, 2011 | Chandos

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