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Alternative & Indie - Released October 30, 2015 | Beggars Banquet

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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The Pleasure Principle was an important point of departure for Gary Numan, and a significant breakthrough moment in the context of his long and storied career. Released about six months after Replicas, it was an instant commercial success, quickly reaching the dizzy heights of number one in the UK Charts. On this record, his third solo effort (and first under his own name), Numan abandoned guitars completely, instead embracing a more synthetic style of production. The album heralded the purely electronic, distinctly robotic sound that this modern icon has become most famous for today. Numan employed a variety of Moog synthesizers to realise The Pleasure Principle, achieving his trademark sound largely by use of the distinctive ‘Vox Humana’ setting. Throw in a healthy dose of production trickery; including flanging, phasing, layers of reverb, and some solo violin, and you are the rest of the way there! Numan was influenced by the greatest pioneers of electronica - Kraftwerk’s epochal Autobahn ghosts the track ‘Cars’ (the very same synths were used!) – and, subsequently, he influenced a generation of new artists. Numan blazed a trail for Nine Inch Nails’s industrial rock, Afrika Bambaataa’s hip-hop explosion, and even early-2000s club bangers like Basement Jaxx’s immortal ‘Where’s Your Head At?’ A pleasure indeed.
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Electronic/Dance - Released December 10, 2018 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Limited

Prominent synth pop/new Wave artist Gary Numan presents his latest live album, Savage: Live at Brixton Academy. Recorded during the first leg of his Savage tour, it contains plenty of Numan's classic tracks as well as several cuts from his latest album, Savage (Songs from a Broken World). ~ Liam Martin
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Electronic/Dance - Released December 16, 2018 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Limited

Long gone are the times when Gary Numan juggled with his Minimoog, Polymoog and other ARP Odyssey. Great guru of the synth pop at the end of the seventies and the start of the eighties, the expert in new wave keyboard orgies remains nonetheless a master of the all synth. As proof, this 21th studio recording of the Londoner, which is actually a concept album about the mix of Western and Eastern cultures in a post-apocalyptic world that has become a desert because of global warming. David Bowie’s influence (who has always followed him like a shadow) is of course there. But Numan remains a true director/sound producer able to set up a personal mood in only two measures. And this Savage is no exception to the rule. © CM/Qobuz

Alternative & Indie - Released March 25, 1997 | Beggars Banquet

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Alternative & Indie - Released January 19, 2018 | Beggars Banquet

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Alternative & Indie - Released December 10, 1997 | Beggars Banquet

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One of the downsides of the new romantic movement is that its groups tended to be more exciting in a video or in the studio than they were in the live arena. One of the rare exceptions to this rule was Gary Numan, a performer whose canny blend of synthesizer textures and conventional rock band instrumentation allowed his music to translate itself to a live format with ease. As a result, he was a popular concert attraction in his native England and listeners can get a good idea of his live skills with Living Ornaments '79. This album, the full set from a September 1979 performance at the Hammersmith Odeon, finds Numan taking a generous selection of tunes from all his albums up to that point and delivering them with a carefully controlled mixture of style and power. Many of the songs are much more energetic than their studio counterparts: the muscular rhythm guitar riffs that propel "Something's in the House" take on a new power in the live arena, and "Me I Disconnect From You" runs twice as fast as its studio incarnation. Other songs on Living Ornaments '79 benefit from new arrangements; the most notable transformation in this area is "Bombers," which is transformed from the fast, guitar-based punk-pop of its studio version into an atmospheric, ballad-paced track where spacy synthesizers replace the guitar riffs. Numan also turns in a surprisingly effective cover of "On Broadway" that culminates in an unexpected, electic violin solo. The remainder of the tracks continue in the same vein as these highlights, effectively mixing live energy with the icy electronic affectations that make Numan's studio classics so interesting. In short, Living Ornaments '79 is a solid live document of Gary Numan in his hitmaking prime and a worthwhile supplement to his studio work for fans. ~ Donald A. Guarisco
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Electronic/Dance - Released December 10, 2018 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Limited

Alternative & Indie - Released October 30, 2015 | Beggars Banquet

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Alternative & Indie - Released August 1, 2005 | Beggars Banquet

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Electronic/Dance - Released July 6, 2017 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Limited

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Electronic/Dance - Released October 4, 2018 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Limited

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Alternative & Indie - Released January 1, 1989 | I.R.S. Records

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Electronic/Dance - Released November 9, 2018 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Limited

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Alternative & Indie - Released January 1, 1989 | I.R.S. Records

Numan has mentioned that he had a terrible time with his deal with IRS, and this live album reflects that. Poorly produced and unenthusiastic, definitely the worst of Numan's various live albums. ~ Steven McDonald
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Pop - Released August 1, 2013 | Castle Communications

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Alternative & Indie - Released January 1, 1991 | Capitol Records

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Electronic/Dance - Released August 21, 2017 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Limited

Alternative & Indie - Released December 9, 2002 | Beggars Banquet

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Alternative & Indie - Released January 1, 2000 | Eagle Rock

One has to give credit to an '80s new wave musician who can adapt and create contemporary-sounding music. There are icons from that era who continue to release new recordings -- Depeche Mode and the Cure, for example -- but don't evolve musically; the sound is unchanging as if they were still back in the decade. This is not a bad thing, however; core listeners are usually who buy these artists' newly released albums and they don't generate new fans. That said, hats off to '80s Brit popster Gary Numan, best known for the hit "Cars," who offers up a modernized industrial-goth set in Pure. The album can comfortably sit alongside Marilyn Manson and Nine Inch Nails on store shelves. Pure doesn't drive like the industrialized adrenaline rush that is, say, Orgy, but the tracks' lingering and creepy pace leaves behind a different kind of impact -- it's more haunting than relentless. You can hear traces of that Brit-pop accent when Numan sings full on, as evidenced on, ironically, a song called "Listen to My Voice," but, otherwise, his vocals are just downright eerie. Pure is good, dark mood music, seasoned with menacing basslines, electronic crashes and spikes, and slow-grinding guitars. It's an effective pairing -- ghostly voice coupled with industrialized music; oftentimes this genre features scream-singing. "Little Invitro" offers the album's darkest moment, lyrically and musically, describing a couple's guilt over an abotion. The song lingers long after the last note resonates. Numan still demonstrates his savvy on the synths, drawing up unique bell, string, and distorted voice sounds, but in a contemporary playing style. This is far from "Cars." Still, remove the Numan name, and one might chalk up Pure to be another industrial-goth album; there is nothing groundbreaking here. However, unlike some other artists from his '80s days, Numan has successfully adapted with the times, and there's something to be said for that. ~ Liana Jonas
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Electronic/Dance - Released November 9, 2018 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Limited