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Blues - Released April 30, 2021 | Provogue Records

How Blue Can You Get collects a selection of unreleased material from the late Gary Moore's archives. Included are takes of Freddie King's "I'm Tore Down," Elmore James' "Done Somebody Wrong," and Memphis Slim's "Steppin' Out," alongside some of Moore's own material. © Rich Wilson /TiVo
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Blues - Released January 31, 2020 | Provogue Records

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In 2009, just over a year before his untimely death, the late, great Irish bluesman played an intimate set at London's Islington Academy which has since gone down in legend among his fans. Recorded for posterity, it appeared in January 2020. Featuring Moore at the top of his game, it includes some of his best-loved tunes including "Since I Met You Baby," "I Love You More Than You'll Ever Know," "Walking by Myself," and the classic "Parisienne Walkways." © John D. Buchanan /TiVo
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Blues - Released November 24, 2017 | Sanctuary Records

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Blues - Released November 24, 2017 | BMG Rights Management (UK) Limited

Blues and Beyond is a compilation box set assembling various recordings from legendary Northern Irish singer/songwriter and blues guitarist Gary Moore. The collection features previously unheard material as well as live renditions of the hits "Still Got the Blues" and "Parisienne Walkways." I Can't Wait Until Tomorrow, an authorized biography written by music journalist Harry Shapiro, is also included. © Rob Wacey /TiVo
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Blues - Released March 12, 2001 | Castle Communications

Six years after his successful tribute to Peter Green, Gary Moore follows with another solid electric blues-rock effort that falls squarely in line with his similarly themed albums Still Got the Blues, After Hours, and Blues Alive. Although he adds brass on a rollicking version of B.B. King's "You Upset Me Baby," Moore predominantly sticks to the basics here, pounding out energetic and full-bodied blues-rock and leading a stripped-down trio with a journeyman's enthusiasm and his trademark thick, sustained guitar solos slashing through the proceedings. The majority of the tracks are originals, although even the best of them sound suspiciously like rewritten blues standards. "Cold Black Night" is little more than a speeded-up "Messin' With the Kid," and "Picture of the Moon" sounds awfully similar to Moore's own "Still Got the Blues." And whether the world needs yet another version of "Stormy Monday" or "I Ain't Got You" is debatable. But Moore pulls off even the most clichéd material with his phenomenal prowess; supple, identifiable vocals; and a guitar tone that effortlessly shifts from a Santana/Peter Green-styled hovering intensity to a slashing Stevie Ray Vaughan attack. While Moore isn't redefining the genre or even his own approach to it, he's adding his stamp to blues-rock with Back to the Blues. Consistently rugged, moving, and heartfelt, the album is a reminder that even without reinventing an established musical style, an artist can effectively work within its boundaries to produce a satisfying, if not quite fresh, interpretation relying solely on talent and passion. © Hal Horowitz /TiVo
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Blues - Released January 1, 1989 | Virgin Catalogue

Gary Moore's 1989 release, After the War features a return to the metal guitar riffing of his '80s records ("Speak for Yourself" and "Running from the Storm"), while continuing to explore more conventional pop dynamics with mixed results. It works great on "Ready to Love," and, after dedicating his last album to fallen childhood friend and musical partner in crime, Phil Lynott, Moore finally honors him in song with the moving "Blood of Emeralds." As it turned out, this would be Moore's last hard rock album before he became a born-again bluesman. © Eduardo Rivadavia /TiVo
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Blues - Released September 22, 2008 | Mercury Studios

Another year, another Gary Moore blues-rock album nearly interchangeable with the last. That's no problem for fans or even newcomers, because despite the surface similarities between releases, Moore never seems to be going through the motions for the sake of further bulking up his already substantial catalog. His tough guitar lines remain biting yet classy, and his underappreciated voice is strong and convincing on originals and covers that nail all of the blues-rock bases without sounding rote. While there are no surprises here, Bad for You Baby is far from a disappointment. Moore continues a string of rugged, post-hard rock, power blues that he has carved his niche in since 1990's Still Got the Blues. He applies his throaty vocals and feral guitar to a pair of Muddy Waters tunes to impressive effect. No one will mistake his versions of Waters' "Walking Through the Park" or "Someday Baby" for the classic Chess era nuggets they are. Yet Moore's rocked up attack hits the mark for being relatively faithful to their melodies even as he wields his power blues sledgehammer. Moore boogies through J.B. Lenoir's "Mojo Boogie" like he invented the style, and even if his husky vocals will never be mistaken for Lenoir's reedy, high pitched singing, he tears into the tune with enough energy to shake up anything in the Johnny Winter songbook. Guitar shredders will thrill to the hot fret acrobatics of the double-time "Down the Line," and those who thought Led Zeppelin's first album was their finest hour should chow down on the hard rocking Jimmy Page-isms of "Umbrella Man." Moore writes one for the ladies on the sweet ballad "Holding On," which won't win any awards for lyrical complexity but boasts a lovely melody and Otis Taylor's daughter, Cassie, on backing vocals. Cassie returns with her dad (plucking nearly inaudible banjo) for the swamped up "Preacher Man Blues" that features some surprisingly effective harp from Moore, the only time he plays it on this disc. Al Kooper's slow, yearning "I Love You More Than You'll Ever Know" from the New Yorker's Blood, Sweat & Tears stint is given an extended, nearly 11-minute treatment that's as compelling as BS&T's. Those hoping for Moore to expand his horizons will need to wait a little longer, but for existing followers and especially those new to his gutsy approach, Bad for You Baby more than fills the bill. © Hal Horowitz /TiVo
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Blues - Released September 22, 2014 | Eagle Rock - Eagle Records

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Blues - Released June 7, 2004 | Castle Communications

After a brief return to his hard rock roots in 2002's Scars, guitarist Gary Moore comes back to the blues where his heart seems to be. But really, Moore's forte is his knack of combining the meaty licks and rugged tone from his gutsy rock to energize the electric blues music he has embraced since 1990's Still Got the Blues. To that end, Scars' drummer Darrin Mooney returns and Bob Daisley, veteran of such thundering outfits as Ozzy Osbourne's band, Uriah Heep and Rainbow, joins on bass. Hence this album's title is appropriate, since the power trio format pounds out this music with clenched-fist authority. Moore is an exceptionally tasty musician but even when the amps are turned up to eleven, as they are for most of this disc, there is feeling in his fiery licks. The originals that dominate are little more than rewritten established blues riffs and his songs are predominantly vehicles for his explosive, wah-wah-heavy attacks. Covers of Willie Dixon's "Evil" and "I Can't Quit You Baby" don't take the tunes anywhere they haven't been before (the latter copies Led Zeppelin's version almost down to the note) but Moore wrings enough guts out of them to make his renderings well-worth hearing, if not essential. A crawling take on Percy Mayfield's "Memory Pain" drags the standard on to Moore's playing field, but maintains the original's sense of sorrow. The guitarist's understated imprint is also evident on ballads like "That's Why I Play the Blues" where his low-key vocals and lighter touch are surprisingly poignant. He seems to be having a ball throughout, singing and playing with the loose authority that only 35 years as a professional musician allows. Moore is especially convincing and enthusiastic on the jazzy, walking bass propelled "Can't Find My Baby," a nice change-up from the album's predominantly charging tone. The creeping menace of the closing "Torn Inside" also shows how Moore uses subtle dynamics and a less-is-more tactic borrowed from his mentor Peter Green, to ramp up the drama. There's nothing here Moore hasn't done previously, but it's another stellar entry into his bulging catalog and a great place for hard rock fans to jump aboard the blues train. © Hal Horowitz /TiVo
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Blues - Released January 1, 1984 | Virgin Catalogue

This album is a jaw-dropping affair for anyone who believes that Eddie Van Halen is the ultimate guitar-shredding experience. Gary Moore's classic live album We Want Moore! is about as good as it gets. Drawing mainly from the Irish guitarist's previous two studio albums, every cut gets a shot in the arm from Moore's extended soloing, most notably the Yardbird's "Shapes of Things" at almost nine minutes. Recorded in places as distant as Tokyo, Glasgow and Detroit, the performances also benefit from the impressive vocal tag team between Moore and rhythm guitarist Neil Carter. © Eduardo Rivadavia /TiVo
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Blues - Released January 1, 2008 | Mercury Studios

Another year, another Gary Moore blues-rock album nearly interchangeable with the last. That's no problem for fans or even newcomers, because despite the surface similarities between releases, Moore never seems to be going through the motions for the sake of further bulking up his already substantial catalog. His tough guitar lines remain biting yet classy, and his underappreciated voice is strong and convincing on originals and covers that nail all of the blues-rock bases without sounding rote. While there are no surprises here, Bad for You Baby is far from a disappointment. Moore continues a string of rugged, post-hard rock, power blues that he has carved his niche in since 1990's Still Got the Blues. He applies his throaty vocals and feral guitar to a pair of Muddy Waters tunes to impressive effect. No one will mistake his versions of Waters' "Walking Through the Park" or "Someday Baby" for the classic Chess era nuggets they are. Yet Moore's rocked up attack hits the mark for being relatively faithful to their melodies even as he wields his power blues sledgehammer. Moore boogies through J.B. Lenoir's "Mojo Boogie" like he invented the style, and even if his husky vocals will never be mistaken for Lenoir's reedy, high pitched singing, he tears into the tune with enough energy to shake up anything in the Johnny Winter songbook. Guitar shredders will thrill to the hot fret acrobatics of the double-time "Down the Line," and those who thought Led Zeppelin's first album was their finest hour should chow down on the hard rocking Jimmy Page-isms of "Umbrella Man." Moore writes one for the ladies on the sweet ballad "Holding On," which won't win any awards for lyrical complexity but boasts a lovely melody and Otis Taylor's daughter, Cassie, on backing vocals. Cassie returns with her dad (plucking nearly inaudible banjo) for the swamped up "Preacher Man Blues" that features some surprisingly effective harp from Moore, the only time he plays it on this disc. Al Kooper's slow, yearning "I Love You More Than You'll Ever Know" from the New Yorker's Blood, Sweat & Tears stint is given an extended, nearly 11-minute treatment that's as compelling as BS&T's. Those hoping for Moore to expand his horizons will need to wait a little longer, but for existing followers and especially those new to his gutsy approach, Bad for You Baby more than fills the bill. © Hal Horowitz /TiVo
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Blues - Released January 1, 2008 | Mercury Studios

Since the early '90s Belfast guitar whiz Gary Moore has returned again and again to the blues, leaving his metal phase far behind. Old New Ballads Blues is exactly what the title says it is, a mix of old blues (covers of songs by Elmore James, Willie Dixon, and Otis Rush), new blues (five Moore originals), ballads (half the album) and, well, blues (by one definition or another, everything here passes for blues). The real surprise is that the strongest songs are the original Moore-penned ballads, as Moore gives powerful and atmospheric performances (both vocally and as a guitarist) on "Gonna Rain Today," "No Reason to Cry," and a solid horn-augmented remake of one of his best songs, "Midnight Blues," from what is easily his best album, 1990s million-selling Still Got the Blues. The James and Dixon covers ("Done Something Wrong" and "You Know My Love" respectively) seem disappointingly by-the-numbers, while the Rush song, "All Your Love," fares a bit better, but Moore's own compositions shine brightest here, giving him plenty of room to weep on the old Les Paul, which is a very good thing, since vocals have never been Moore's strongest suit and his lyrics are often on the slight side. All of that vanishes when his guitar takes over a song, and on the instrumental "Cut It Out," Moore's muscular guitar tone says as much or more about life inside the blues as any of the vocal numbers. © Steve Leggett /TiVo
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Blues - Released November 24, 2017 | Sanctuary Records

Blues and Beyond is a compilation box set assembling various recordings from legendary Northern Irish singer/songwriter and blues guitarist Gary Moore. The collection features previously unheard material as well as live renditions of the hits "Still Got the Blues" and "Parisienne Walkways." I Can't Wait Until Tomorrow, an authorized biography written by music journalist Harry Shapiro, is also included. © Rob Wacey /TiVo