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R&B - Released August 30, 2005 | Rhino Atlantic

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Pop - Released January 1, 2000 | The Right Stuff

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R&B - Released March 20, 2020 | Sunset Blvd Records

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Rock - Released January 1, 1996 | EMI Music Special Markets

The first of Freddie King's three albums for Leon Russell's Shelter label set the tone for his work for the company: competent electric blues with a prominent rock/soul influence. King sings and plays well, but neither the sidemen nor the material challenge him to scale significant heights. Part of the problem is that King himself wrote none of the songs, which are divided between Chicago blues standards and material supplied by Leon Russell and Don Nix. The entire album is included on the compilation King of the Blues. © Richie Unterberger /TiVo
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R&B - Released January 1, 1972 | The Right Stuff

Similar to his first Shelter outing (Getting Ready), but with more of a rock feel. That's due as much to the material as the production. Besides covering tunes by Jimmy Rogers, Howlin' Wolf, and Elmore James, King tackles compositions by Leon Russell and, more unexpectedly, Bill Withers, Isaac Hayes-David Porter, and John Fogerty (whose "Lodi" is reworked into "Lowdown in Lodi"). King's own pen remained virtually in retirement, as he wrote only one of the album's tracks. Reissued in its entirety on King of the Blues. © Richie Unterberger /TiVo
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R&B - Released April 8, 2008 | Rhino Atlantic

The King Curtis-produced set employs heavyweight NYC session cats and adds a very slight tinge of contemporary rock tonality. © TiVo
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Blues - Released August 4, 2014 | Rhino Atlantic

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"...King's unforced singing has rarely been captured so happily on record before and his playing is nonpareil all the way through....a superb album of modern blues...performed with taste, vitality, and above all imagination..."
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Blues - Released January 1, 1974 | Special Products

Produced in part by Mike Vernon, who worked on The Legendary Christine Perfect Album, this is an entertaining and concise package of ten songs performed by the late Freddie King and a slew of guests. Opening with Gonzalez Chandler's "Pack It Up," featuring the Gonzalez Horn Section, the youthful legend was only 40 years of age when he cut this career LP two years before his death. Though no songs went up the charts like his Top Five hit in 1961, "Hide Away," Burglar is one of those gems that journeymen can put together in their sleep. Tom Dowd produced "Sugar Sweet" at Criteria Studios in Miami, FL, featuring Jamie Oldaker on drums, Carl Radle on bass, and guitarists Eric Clapton and George Terry, which, of course, makes this album highly collectable in the Clapton circles. The sound doesn't deviate much from the rest of the disc's Mike Vernon production work; it is pure Freddy King, like on the final track, E. King's "Come On (Let the Good Times Roll)," where his guitar bursts through the horns and party atmosphere, creating a fusion of the pure blues found on "Sugar Sweet" and the rock that fans of Grand Funk grooved to when he opened for that group and was immortalized in their 1973 number one hit "We're an American Band" a year after this record's release. Sylistically, Freddie King is from the same school as Buddy Guy, two men instrumental in bringing this art form to a mass audience. King stretches those sounds with great fervor on the Hayes/Porter number "I Had a Dream," containing the strength Mark Farner said the blues artist displayed in concert, which could snap a guitar neck. The voice of Freddie King is what drives J.J. Cale's "I Got the Same Old Blues," the horns and the guitar battling between verses and uniting to ooze under the guitarist's vocal expression. Rhythm guitarist Bob Tench, producer Mike Vernon, bassist DeLisle Harper, drummer Steve Ferrone, and pianist Roy Davies all co-write "Texas Flyer" with Freddie King, a prime example of the modern blues this artist was developing. With Brian Auger and Pete Wingfield contributing to the title track, Jerry Ragovoy's "She's a Burglar," this project stands as a solid representation of an important musician which is as enjoyable as it is historic. © Joe Viglione /TiVo
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Blues - Released September 17, 2001 | Fuel Records

Hip-O's Ultimate Collection is one of the first truly comprehensive overviews of Freddie King's career, starting with his seminal recordings for Federal and running all the way to his final recordings for RSO in the mid-'70s. This is a mixed blessing. On one hand, it's nice to have a disc that tells the whole story, but the shifting production values and performance aesthetics make for slightly uneven listening. Throughout it all, though, King's playing shines and it's clear that even if his material and approach wavered toward the '70s, there was plenty to enjoy within his musicianship. Nevertheless, this is a place to go when you want to dig a little deeper, when you want a map of his entire career; if you want to delve in, head toward Rhino's collection of his Federal/King sides. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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R&B - Released January 1, 1973 | The Right Stuff

King's last Shelter album was his most elaborately produced, with occasional string arrangements and female backups vocals, although these didn't really detract from the net result. Boasting perhaps heavier rock elements than his other Shelter efforts, it was characteristically divided between blues standards (by the likes of Willie Dixon and Elmore James), Leon Russell tunes, and more R&B/soul-inclined material by the likes of Ray Charles and Percy Mayfield. It's been reissued, along with his other Shelter albums, on the King of the Blues anthology. © Richie Unterberger /TiVo
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Blues - Released August 24, 2006 | Fuel 2000

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Blues - Released January 1, 2006 | Shout Factory

This Atlanta concert wasn't issued in recorded form for two decades. Archival releases of this sort tend to be for collectors only, but this is a cut above the standard. The sound is very good, the band is pretty tight, and Freddie King solos with fire and sings with conviction, sticking mostly to covers of warhorses like "Dust My Broom," "Key to the Highway," and "Sweet Home Chicago." It's a better deal, in fact, than his studio albums for Shelter in the early '70s, boasting a no-frills small-combo approach that is far more suitable. As a neat bonus, it also contains two solo acoustic performances recorded at a Dallas radio station in the 1970s. © Richie Unterberger /TiVo
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Blues - Released August 4, 2014 | Rhino Atlantic

"...King's unforced singing has rarely been captured so happily on record before and his playing is nonpareil all the way through....a superb album of modern blues...performed with taste, vitality, and above all imagination..." © TiVo
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Blues - Released May 30, 2002 | Fuel Records

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R&B - Released March 27, 2020 | Sunset Blvd Records

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released July 17, 2017 | Sony Music Entertainment

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Blues - Released August 1, 2007 | Synergie OMP

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Blues - Released June 1, 2014 | RockBeat Records

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Blues - Released February 2, 2012 | Airline Records

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Blues - Released November 18, 2012 | Carter Lane - OMiP