Categories :

Similar artists

Albums

CD$12.99

Pop - Released August 16, 2019 | Polydor Records

English singer/songwriter Frank Turner was wise enough to anticipate the heat he might get for delivering No Man's Land, an album of original songs based on the lives of historic women. Produced by Catherine Marks and performed by a crack band of all-female musicians, Turner also recorded a 13-episode podcast corresponding to each of his songs' subjects; he's also written a blog post about his motivations. While his attendant media and perceived apologia seem, on the surface, to amount to self-justification, as an artist he can write about who and what he wants and let the critical chips fall where they may. "Jinny Bingham's Ghost" is a galloping folk-punk tune that revives the legend about an abused 17th century landlady who poisoned and cooked male perpetrators and was ultimately condemned as a witch. Turner connects the tale to the rock & roll dive bar on the site of her tavern and its current role as "a sanctuary for all broken boys and girls." The jangly, hook-laden rock single "Sister Rosetta" is a tribute to Sister Rosetta Tharpe, the legendary blues and gospel guitarist and singer who pre-figured rock & roll and influenced everyone from Chuck Berry and Little Richard to Johnny Cash and Elvis. The Celtic folk-rock of "I Believed You, William Blake" is perceived through wife Catherine Blake's eyes. She took an active role in the production of his engravings and illuminated books, ran the household finances, and offered foundational support. Via Turner's account, Mrs. Blake righteously claims the poet's debt to her belief in him when society thought him mad. The lithe "Nica," complete with ragtime horn charts, is inspired by jazz patron and baroness Pannonica de Koenigswarter (née Rothschild), a fierce French Resistance fighter who also used her wealth and influence to promote jazz during the bebop era; later she cared for Charlie Parker and Thelonious Monk at the end of their lives. "A Perfect Wife," a lovely folk waltz, is an account (first person) from Nannie Doss, the American serial killer who took the lives of 11 men who abused her. Musically, "Silent Key," about the last moments in the life of teacher and astronaut Krista McAuliffe, is arguably the loveliest tune on the set, with parlor strings, acoustic guitars, and a female backing chorus. The set's anthem is "The Lioness," a tribute to 20th century Egyptian proto-feminist Huda Sha'arawi. The set closes with "Rosemary Jane," a tribute to Turner's mother. It's the other side of the coin to 2007's excoriating "Father’s Day" and places him on the side of the family matriarch and his sisters. While the male gaze is undeniable, Turner acknowledges it openly and it doesn't overshadow the lyrical and musical qualities in these songs themselves. He tells these stories (many of them dark and tragic) with empathy, tenderness, and a desire to illuminate curiosity about his subjects, making No Man's Land a welcome addition to Turner's catalog. ~ Thom Jurek
HI-RES$14.99
CD$12.99

Alternatif et Indé - Released December 13, 2019 | Polydor Records

Hi-Res
CD$12.99

Alternatif et Indé - Released May 4, 2018 | Polydor Records

CD$16.49

Alternatif et Indé - Released November 24, 2017 | Polydor Records

Over the last 12 years, Bahrain-born, British singer/songwriter Frank Turner has built a rapport with his devoted audience. The bond between them is unbreakable and feels almost sacred. The double-length Songbook is an overview of the 2000s, and marks the anniversary of the arrival of his solo debut, Sleep Is for the Week. Far from his first compilation, one might wonder -- initially -- what separates this set from the various Three Years compilations or Ten for Ten. But this set offers a twist that makes it worthy of purchase for both longtime fans and newbies. With 29 tracks spread over two discs, it's almost too much of a good thing. Disc one is, for the most part, a proper remastered overview of highlights from the 2000s. Evidence lies in the opener, and one of the most beloved songs in Turner's catalog: "Four Simple Words," one of the more poignant and incisive songs about millennials yet written. 17 of the next 18 cuts contain the "hits" and deep tracks that have helped establish Turner as one of the U.K.'s most masterful songwriters. There are the mandatory audience-participation jams such as "Get Better" alongside the wiseacre "I Knew Prufrock Before He Got Famous," the jaunty solo electric rocker "Long Live the Queen," and gentler options including "Mittens," "Photosynthesis," and "The Opening Act of Spring." There's also a new track to close the disc out in the polished yet searing love song "There She Is." Fans know that Turner's career has had its share of romantic ups and downs, but this number, with its relatively slick production and a vocal and arrangement that suggests prime-era Robert Smith and the Cure, is a keeper. Disc two is the real gem, however, and it's the one for seasoned fans. It offers ten tracks -- some repeats from disc one, and some different selections -- that have been reworked, sometimes radically. That said, there isn't a duff choice in the bunch. Check both versions of "Photosynthesis" and the even more startling "Glorious You" for evidence. In essence, these tracks have been totally revisioned, and can be heard as "new." The ever-so-slightly funky drum shuffle on "Polaroid Picture" offers this utterly devastating tune as a bittersweet reflection of empathy and acceptance rather than just regret. The new versions of "minor" works such as "Love Forty Down" and "Broken Piano" are welcome entries that deserve critical reappraisal. While disc one offers newcomers a nice, wide gateway into Turner's sometimes astonishing talents as a songwriter, the second offers seasoned listeners a new appreciation of him as a singer as well as an arranger of canny depth and sophistication. Turner proved long ago that he was a major singer/songwriter for the new millennium. On Songbook, he also opens the gate for listeners to accept him as a truly gifted all-around musician, whose relationship with his songs is ever-evolving and often utterly revelatory. ~ Thom Jurek
HI-RES$14.99
CD$12.99

Pop - Released August 14, 2015 | Polydor Records

Hi-Res
CD$4.99

Alternatif et Indé - Released January 24, 2019 | Polydor Records

CD$11.99

Alternatif et Indé - Released June 7, 2011 | Epitaph

CD$9.99

Punk - New Wave - Released December 19, 2009 | Xtra Mile Recordings

Alternatif et Indé - Released October 2, 2013 | Epitaph

Download not available
Billed as a set of rarities and standards, the 15-track Last Minutes and Lost Evenings is designed as a sort of Frank Turner primer for uninitiated North American audiences. The English punk rocker turned folk-punker (he used to play in the London-based hardcore outfit Million Dead), who counts Johnny Cash, Billy Bragg, the Beatles, and the Boss as influences, has been quietly establishing himself as a voice of the people since his 2007 debut, Sleep Is for the Week, balancing the working class pragmatism of Ewan MacColl and Woody Guthrie with the rowdy, anti-establishment swagger of Against Me! and Joe Strummer. Lyrically sharp, musically simple, yet sound and always one verse away from a pint-swinging chorus, Turner should have little trouble infiltrating the Dropkick Murphys/Flogging Molly/Social Distortion crowd, especially with rousing blue-collar anthems like "Sons of Liberty," "I Knew Prufrock Before He Got Famous," and "I Still Believe," and his obvious love of American country and folk music, best exemplified by full-band, open-highway rovers like "The Road," while "Nashville Tennessee" helps to soften some of the more region-specific vernacular. Hand-picked by the artist, the songs on Last Minutes and Lost Evenings ebb and flow with grit and grace. That said, Turner garnered some of his best reviews with 2011's excellent England Keep My Bones (the riveting "One Foot Before the Other" seamlessly integrates his hardcore punk past into his more rustic present), but only the aforementioned "I Still Believe" was chosen to represent. It’s hardly a deal breaker, though, as the target audience for the compilation will be oblivious to any deficiencies that would otherwise be obvious to seasoned fans, many of whom will be picking up Last Minutes and Lost Evenings purely for the bundled DVD of Turner's magnificent headlining performance at Wembley Arena. ~ James Christopher Monger
CD$9.99

Folk/Americana - Released | Xtra Mile Recordings

CD$15.99

Folk/Americana - Released | Xtra Mile Recordings

CD$14.99

Alternatif et Indé - Released January 1, 2013 | Polydor Records

CD$18.99

Pop - Released August 7, 2015 | Polydor Records

CD$9.99

Alternatif et Indé - Released May 18, 2009 | Anti - Epitaph

CD$6.49

Pop - Released March 4, 2016 | Polydor Records

CD$9.99

Punk - New Wave - Released December 19, 2009 | Xtra Mile Recordings

CD$9.99

Punk - New Wave - Released March 31, 2008 | Xtra Mile Recordings

CD$6.49

Rock - Released January 1, 2014 | Polydor Records

CD$1.49

Alternatif et Indé - Released April 6, 2018 | Polydor Records

CD$9.99

Alternatif et Indé - Released September 7, 2010 | Epitaph