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Crooners - Released April 1, 1955 | CAPITOL CATALOG MKT (C92)

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Vocal Jazz - Released January 1, 2010 | FRANK SINATRA DIGITAL REPRISE

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Vocal Jazz - Released January 1, 2009 | FRANK SINATRA DIGITAL REPRISE

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Jazz - Released March 1, 1969 | FRANK SINATRA DIGITAL REPRISE

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
Although it follows the same patterns and approach as Cycles, My Way is a stronger album, with a better, more varied selection of material and a more focused, gutsy performance from Frank Sinatra. Built around the hit single "My Way," the album again alternates between rock covers ("Yesterday," "Hallelujah, I Love Her So," "For Once in My Life," "Didn't We," "Mrs. Robinson"), a couple of adapted French songs, and a handful of standards. This time out, Don Costa has written more engaging charts than the previous Cycles. The Beatles' "Yesterday" is given an affecting, melancholy treatment that brings out the best in Sinatra, as does the new arrangement of "All My Tomorrows," which is lush and aching. If Sinatra doesn't quite pull off the R&B of "Hallelujah, I Love Her So," he does sing the light Latin stylings of "A Day in the Life of a Fool" beautifully, and he has fun with Paul Simon's "Mrs. Robinson," changing the lyrics dramatically so they become a tongue-in-cheek, swinging hipster tribute. For that matter, most of the record is successful in creating a middle ground between the traditional pop Sinatra loves and the contemporary pop/rock that dominated the charts in the late '60s. My Way doesn't have the macho swagger of his prime Rat Pack records, but its reflective, knowing arrangements show that Sinatra could come to terms with rock & roll at some level. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Vocal Jazz - Released January 1, 1998 | Capitol Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Pop - Released January 1, 1954 | CAPITOL CATALOG MKT (C92)

Hi-Res Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Pop - Released January 1, 1999 | Capitol Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
Frank Sinatra's second set of torch songs recorded with Gordon Jenkins, No One Cares was nearly as good as its predecessor Where Are You? Expanding the melancholy tone of the duo's previous collaboration, No One Cares consists of nothing but brooding, lonely songs. Jenkins gives the songs a subtly tragic treatment, and Sinatra responds with a wrenching performance. It lacks the grandiose melancholy of Only the Lonely, nor is it as lush as Where Are You?, but in its slow, bluesy tempos and heartbreaking little flourishes, it is every bit as moving. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Jazz - Released January 1, 2010 | FRANK SINATRA DIGITAL REPRISE

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
September of My Years is one of Frank Sinatra's triumphs of the '60s, an album that consolidated his strengths while moving him into new territory, primarily in terms of tone. More than the double-disc set A Man and His Music -- which was released a year after this album -- September of My Years captures how Sinatra was at the time of his 50th birthday. Gordon Jenkins' rich, stately, and melancholy arrangements give the album an appropriate reflective atmosphere. Most of the songs are new or relatively recent numbers; every cut fits into a loose theme of aging, reflection, and regret. Sinatra, however, doesn't seem stuck in his ways -- though the songs are rooted in traditional pop, they touch on folk and contemporary pop. As such, the album offered a perfect summary, as well as suggesting future routes for the singer. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Jazz - Released January 1, 2009 | FRANK SINATRA DIGITAL REPRISE

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Pop - Released January 1, 2009 | FRANK SINATRA DIGITAL REPRISE

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
Strangers in the Night marked Frank Sinatra's return to the top of the pop charts in the mid-'60s, and it consolidated the comeback he started in 1965. Although he later claimed he disliked the title track, the album was an inventive, rich effort from Sinatra, one that established him as a still-viable star to a wide, mainstream audience without losing the core of his sound. Combining pop hits ("Downtown," [RoviLink="MC"]"On a Clear Day [You Can See Forever],"[/RoviLink] "Call Me") with show tunes and standards, the album creates a delicate but comfortable balance between big band and pop instrumentation. Using strings, horns, and an organ, Nelson Riddle constructed an easy, deceptively swinging sound that appealed to both Sinatra's dedicated fans and pop radio. And Sinatra's singing is relaxed, confident, and surprisingly jazzy, as he plays with the melody of "The Most Beautiful Girl in the World" and delivers a knockout punch with the assured, breathtaking "Summer Wind." Although he would not record another album with Riddle again, Sinatra would expand the approach of Strangers in the Night for the rest of the decade. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1998 | FRANK SINATRA DIGITAL REPRISE

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
As the title suggests, I Remember Tommy is an affectionate tribute to Tommy Dorsey, the legendary bandleader who helped elevate Frank Sinatra to stardom. Arranged by Sy Oliver, who also gained attention through Dorsey, the album contains a number of songs that were part of the Sinatra/Dorsey repertoire, given slightly new readings. Though the intentions were good, the new versions pale in comparison to the originals. Nevertheless, there are a handful of gems included on the record, making it worthwhile for dedicated Sinatra aficionados. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Pop - Released January 1, 1998 | Capitol Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1998 | FRANK SINATRA DIGITAL REPRISE

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Vocal Jazz - Released January 1, 2010 | FRANK SINATRA DIGITAL REPRISE

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
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Pop - Released January 1, 1999 | Capitol Records

Distinctions The Qobuz Ideal Discography
Close to You is one of Frank Sinatra's most gentle and intimate albums, and that is due in no small part to the Hollywood String Quartet, which forms the core of the album's instrumental support. It also was one of the most difficult to record, taking eight months and five different sessions. Certainly, it is one of the most unusual and special of Sinatra's albums, featuring a subdued and detailed performances that accentuate both the romantic longing and understated humor of the numbers, which are mainly torch songs. With the quartet's support, the album comes closer to sounding like a classical album, like a pop variation on chamber music. Where the intimacy of In the Wee Small Hours sounded confessional and heart-broken, Close to You has a delicate, lovely quality; it may not be seductive, but it is charming and romantic. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Crooners - Released November 20, 2015 | Columbia - Legacy

Hi-Res Distinctions 5 Sterne Fono Forum Jazz
Filling in a gap in Frank Sinatra's history, Legacy's 2015 box A Voice on Air collects over 100 radio broadcasts recorded between 1935 and 1955. This is the first collection to chronicle this era -- over 90 of its 100 tracks are previously unreleased -- and it's pulled from a variety of sources, including the Sinatra estate's vaults, the Library of Congress, and the Paley Center for Media, each strand assisting in sterling re-creations of original broadcasts from Frank's bobbysocks days, World War II, and the nascent saloon singer of the '50s. Sinatra wound up singing some of these songs in the studio but not necessarily in these arrangements, a wrinkle that would be tantalizing enough but a good portion of A Voice on Air is devoted to songs he only sang on the air. Some of these are little more than novelties -- the flashiest being "(Li'l Abner) Don't Marry That Gal," a song co-written by cartoonist Al Capp cashing in on his hit strip -- and there is a fair share of duets, with both musicians (Nat King Cole, Slim Gaillard) and cultural figures (Gov. Jimmie Davis comes in to sing his "You Are My Sunshine"). Part of the appeal of this set is how the very fact that it's grounded in specific years accentuates transience: there are jokes that need footnotes, broadcasts from World War II, commercials for cigarettes, and other musty conventions that never quite seep onto Sinatra's studio recordings. Here, they're part of the main text. There might be a fair amount of standards peppered throughout the set but they're unwitting anchors for a set that's proudly not timeless. Instead, it showcases a Sinatra on the rise, a singer relying on his inventive phrasing and incandescent charisma, elements that are undeniable and vital even when heard in these appealing old-fashioned surroundings. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Jazz - Released January 1, 2008 | FRANK SINATRA DIGITAL REPRISE

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Vocal Jazz - Released January 1, 1966 | FRANK SINATRA DIGITAL REPRISE

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Strangers in the Night marked Frank Sinatra's return to the top of the pop charts in the mid-'60s, and it consolidated the comeback he started in 1965. Although he later claimed he disliked the title track, the album was an inventive, rich effort from Sinatra, one that established him as a still-viable star to a wide, mainstream audience without losing the core of his sound. Combining pop hits ("Downtown," [RoviLink="MC"]"On a Clear Day [You Can See Forever],"[/RoviLink] "Call Me") with show tunes and standards, the album creates a delicate but comfortable balance between big band and pop instrumentation. Using strings, horns, and an organ, Nelson Riddle constructed an easy, deceptively swinging sound that appealed to both Sinatra's dedicated fans and pop radio. And Sinatra's singing is relaxed, confident, and surprisingly jazzy, as he plays with the melody of "The Most Beautiful Girl in the World" and delivers a knockout punch with the assured, breathtaking "Summer Wind." Although he would not record another album with Riddle again, Sinatra would expand the approach of Strangers in the Night for the rest of the decade. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
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Jazz - Released January 1, 1984 | FRANK SINATRA DIGITAL REPRISE

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Ambient/New Age - Released September 21, 1957 | Capitol Records

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Frank Sinatra in the magazine