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Alternative & Indie - Released May 6, 2020 | PTKF

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The extreme tension and sincere rage of Dogrel, their first album, is still resonating as Fontaines D.C. strike again while the iron is hot. However, with A Hero’s Death, the Dublin band have shifted gear. They're still taking their influences from the post-punk scriptures of The Fall, Joy Division, Gang Of Four and Public Image Ltd., but this “difficult second album” also goes in other directions. The slow, almost oppressing rhythm on the opening I Don’t Belong introduces the band's new image. This image is that of a group dealing with the instantaneous success of their first album and the weighty tour that followed. Fontaines D.C. broaden their scope with ballads like Sunny and its baritone guitars, remisiscent of Indian summers, or Oh Such a Spring on which Grian Chatten sings with extraordinary delicacy. But A Hero’s Death also has the unstoppable clout that made Dogrel so good, anthems on which Chatten infinitely repeats the same phrase like “Life ain’t always empty”, belted out thirty times on the title track, A Hero’s Death, and “What ya call it, what ya call it, what ya” on Televised Mind… From the beginning, A Hero’s Death oscillates between incredibly rebellious and juvenile tension and more meditative, almost nostalgic sequences. Dogrel finished with Dublin City Sky, an acoustic ballad which conjured up images of a homely old pub and freshly pulled pints of Guinness, like a Pogues record (their favourite band). A Hero’s Death closes with No, another stripped back ballad, à la Oasis this time, which substitutes post-punk pessimism for lighter optimism, punctuated with the phrase “Please don’t lock yourself away just appreciate the grey”. Hard-hitting and brilliant. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Alternative & Indie - Released April 12, 2019 | PTKF

Having barely recovered from Songs of Praise - the first album and Qobuzissime of the London band Shame - the eyes of rock’n’roll are looking further north, to Dublin. Here, an equally raucous band called Fontaines D.C. are fighting tooth and nail to show that the post-punk revival is most certainly still alive and kicking (and punching). If Fontaines D.C.’s debut album, Dogrel, has its roots in familiar ground (The Fall, Joy Division, Gang of Four, Public Image Ltd.), the fertiliser is most certainly different. This album oozes a quintessential Irish sensibility, one that cries out for a picture-postcard Dublin that’s been wiped out by globalisation and gentrification. Dogrel ends with Dublin City Sky, an acoustic ballad that could have been taken straight out of a Pogues album - The Pogues being Fontaines D.C.’s favourite band - evoking the smell of old pubs and freshly pulled pints of Guinness. Grian Chatten's band also has the distinction of honouring literature and poetry just as much as rock'n'roll and folk music. The result is an intelligently crafted pure post-punk record. That is the strength of Dogrel. Unapologetically literate, angry and always audible. On Big, Chatten sings “my childhood was small, but I’m gonna be big”. With Dogrel, Fontaines D.C. are quickly heading towards becoming exactly that. © Marc Zisman/Qobuz
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Alternative & Indie - Released August 20, 2018 | PTKF

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Rock - Released December 4, 2020 | PTKF

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Alternative & Indie - Released August 20, 2018 | PTKF

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Alternative & Indie - Released November 12, 2018 | PTKF

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Alternative & Indie - Released August 29, 2019 | PTKF

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Alternative & Indie - Released August 29, 2019 | PTKF

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Electronic - Released July 7, 2021 | PTKF

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Fontaines D.C. in the magazine