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$16.49

Country - Released February 15, 2019 | BMLG Records

Florida Georgia Line may not have invented "bro country," but they will forever be the act best known for it, thanks to the pioneering decision to layer hip-hop flex over their weekend-backwoods-warrior schtick. On Can't Say I Ain’t Country, Tyler Hubbard and Brian Kelly defy anyone to challenge their credentials, offering Southern-fried guitar and a check-list of their formula’s ingredients: longnecks, cussing on Sundays, and trucks.  The cataloging continues on earworms "Small Town" (pinch of tobacco, tractor, cow-tipping) and "Y'all Boys" (state trophies, pretty girl, Jack and Coke).  It's all delivered with Hubbard and Kelly's exaggerated vocal twang and rapid-fire delivery, which works especially well on the irresistible stomper "Speed of Love," one of several times the duo lean into hillbilly novelty (along with a handful of goofball skits). Ever ready to mix it up, they tap R&B artist Jason Derulo for the Boyz II Men-esque "Women" and hat-country king Jason Aldean for the blistering "Can't Hide Red," and channel the folksy Lumineers on "Simple." It's all over the place, but in a good (ol' boy) way. © Qobuz
$16.49

Country - Released August 26, 2016 | Big Machine Label Group, LLC

Booklet
Three albums in, Florida Georgia Line carved out their own niche -- part good times, part tearjerkers -- but they're not staying in place. Rather, if 2016's Dig Your Roots is any indication, they're choosing to settle into a groove, sliding into their status as slowly mellowing country bros. Staring down 30, FGL still find time to have fun, but the party no longer lasts all night; it's a gentle breeze on an "Island" or a Sunday afternoon reggae sunsplash with Ziggy Marley. Such softening of the ravers puts the rest of their music in sharper relief, making it all seem sentimental. Naturally, this is a conscious effort on Florida Georgia Line's part, a reflection of their steady maturation and the realization of their natural affinity for the MOR adult contemporary of the Backstreet Boys, the former teen pop band who cameo on "God, Your Mama and Me." Much of the album is devoted to slow-burning love songs that wouldn't have seemed out of place on a BSB album, romance that is offset by a striking number of songs about growing up and growing old including "While He's Still Around," a mawkish ode to a father who seems in no danger of kicking the bucket any time soon. Such bad taste has been a staple for Florida Georgia Line, but on their first two records, it's manifested in the bumping party tunes. Here, that inclination has been transformed into treacly ballads and the shift toward unapologetic soft rock does Florida Georgia Line a world of good: by favoring a gentle touch, they emphasize their melodicism, which has always been their most appealing trait. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
$21.49

Country - Released January 1, 2013 | Big Machine Label Group

Booklet
$14.99

Country - Released October 14, 2014 | Big Machine Label Group

When Florida Georgia Line released their debut Here's to the Good Times in 2012, the duo of Brian Kelley and Tyler Hubbard had no idea what kind of good times were about to come their way. Surely, the duo had a record-breaking 2013, as their breakthrough hit "Cruise" racked up 24 weeks at number one on the Billboard country charts, breaking the record that had stood in place since 1955. Such success surely can't be replicated and, to FGL's credit, they don't seem quite as concerned with surpassing "Cruise" and "Get Your Shine On" on 2014's Anything Goes, their highly anticipated second album. Despite the loosey-goosey title, there's not much left to chance on Anything Goes: it's designed to consolidate Florida Georgia Line's success and maybe give them a little bit of cred they never amassed on their debut. Those serious moments, crystallized by the salt-of-the-earth dirgey lead single "Dirt," are where FGL stumble. Whenever the duo acknowledge their essential suburbanness -- which they do often, singing about Victoria's Secret, Bacardi, and Seven Jeans among any other number of lifestyle signifiers -- things flow just fine on Anything Goes. Kelley and Hubbard have an easy chemistry that lends itself to lubrication by Auto-Tune and the sleek digital gloss that shimmers over the entire album. Sometimes, FGL broaden their musical scope -- there's some reggae on "Sun Daze," which embraces the reggae sunsplash aspirations of its title -- but Anything Goes shines brightest when they do modulated riffs on "Cruise" or "Get Your Shine On," relying on party anthems that are bright, laid-back, and never, ever rowdy. If Florida Georgia Line feel anonymous, that's not a bug: by design, they're playing to the largest possible audience, so nobody should be surprised that Anything Goes is so broad it avoids such messiness as personality. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine
$10.49

Country - Released January 1, 2012 | Big Machine Label Group

Booklet
$1.49

Pop - Released January 1, 2013 | Big Machine Label Group

$1.49

Country - Released May 25, 2018 | BMLG Records, LLC

$21.49

Country - Released January 1, 2013 | Big Machine Label Group

Florida Georgia Line (Georgia's Tyler Hubbard and Florida's Brian Kelley) broke onto the contemporary country scene in the spring of 2012 with the infectious summer single "Cruise," a song that blended cruising country back roads and farm towns with ragged drums and layers of rock guitar, and sounded a bit like an amped-up, next-generation Brooks & Dunn. The duo seems poised for stardom going into the second decade of the 21st century, a time when country seems to be as much AC/DC as it is George Strait or George Jones (although both Georges get name-checked a lot these days in country songs one can hardly imagine either of them singing). Florida Georgia Line released a five-song EP, It'z Just What We Do, produced by Joey Moi, behind "Cruise," and Here's to the Good Times, the group's first official full-length album, contains all five of those songs, plus six more, which were also produced by Moi. It's an aptly named album, because good times are at the heart of everything here, with songs like "Cruise," "Tip It Back," and "Party People" pretty much summing up Florida Georgia Line's philosophy. This is an album based on summer energy, drinking beer, taking shots, driving back roads, and the romantic glories and possibilities of Friday and Saturday nights with nothing to do but look for those good times. Fair enough. This kind of pop/rocked-up version of country is obviously here to stay, and is probably the commercial future of the whole franchise. Florida Georgia Line are pretty good at it, even if someone like Keith Urban actually does it better. ~ Steve Leggett
$14.99

Country - Released October 14, 2014 | Big Machine Label Group

Booklet
When Florida Georgia Line released their debut Here's to the Good Times in 2012, the duo of Brian Kelley and Tyler Hubbard had no idea what kind of good times were about to come their way. Surely, the duo had a record-breaking 2013, as their breakthrough hit "Cruise" racked up 24 weeks at number one on the Billboard country charts, breaking the record that had stood in place since 1955. Such success surely can't be replicated and, to FGL's credit, they don't seem quite as concerned with surpassing "Cruise" and "Get Your Shine On" on 2014's Anything Goes, their highly anticipated second album. Despite the loosey-goosey title, there's not much left to chance on Anything Goes: it's designed to consolidate Florida Georgia Line's success and maybe give them a little bit of cred they never amassed on their debut. Those serious moments, crystallized by the salt-of-the-earth dirgey lead single "Dirt," are where FGL stumble. Whenever the duo acknowledge their essential suburbanness -- which they do often, singing about Victoria's Secret, Bacardi, and Seven Jeans among any other number of lifestyle signifiers -- things flow just fine on Anything Goes. Kelley and Hubbard have an easy chemistry that lends itself to lubrication by Auto-Tune and the sleek digital gloss that shimmers over the entire album. Sometimes, FGL broaden their musical scope -- there's some reggae on "Sun Daze," which embraces the reggae sunsplash aspirations of its title -- but Anything Goes shines brightest when they do modulated riffs on "Cruise" or "Get Your Shine On," relying on party anthems that are bright, laid-back, and never, ever rowdy. If Florida Georgia Line feel anonymous, that's not a bug: by design, they're playing to the largest possible audience, so nobody should be surprised that Anything Goes is so broad it avoids such messiness as personality. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine

Country - Released August 25, 2016 | BMLG Records

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$10.49

Country - Released January 1, 2012 | BMX

$1.49

Country - Released September 23, 2014 | Big Machine Label Group