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R&B - Released April 20, 2005 | Bad Boy Records

Faith Evans' second album Keep the Faith was met with quite a bit of anticipation. The album was released three years after her acclaimed, soulful, and raw debut Faith, and in that time she had witnessed the murder of her husband the Notorious B.I.G., which led to the biggest hit of her career (and one of the biggest of the 1990s), the tribute "I'll Be Missing You" (in collaboration with Puff Daddy). Keep the Faith proved to be a success, and she happily avoided the curse of the sophomore slump. The album scored two Top Ten singles with the irresistible dance/R&B cut "Love Like This" and its follow-up, the equally intoxicating "All Night Long." Aside from those two dance numbers, the rest of the album falls somewhere between heavy ballads and mid-tempo grooves. Ms. Evans shines when she sings fast or mid-tempo songs, such as the slick "Life Will Pass You By," but the ballads weigh too heavily on this otherwise fine album. Some of the ballads stand tall, such as the gorgeous "My First Love" and the inspiration-tinged "Keep the Faith," while others are about as entertaining and inspired as tree sap ("Anything You Need" and the yawn-inducing interludes). Unfortunately, these ballads are all lumped together on this album, to the point where they almost blend into one long drip of molasses. However, the classy Ms. Evans possesses a beautiful voice, is a gifted songwriter, and happily steers clear of the tacky clichés that burden so much contemporary R&B. So despite the heavy reliance on ballads, this is actually a fine album, and is without a doubt a highlight of 1990s soul-pop music. Other notable tunes include the beautiful "Never Gonna Let You Go," which could be classified as the last great Babyface hit song of the 1990s (that song, incidentally, topped the R&B charts and hit the Top 20 on the pop charts), and the Dianne Warren-penned "Lately I," which never became the hit it should have been. © Jose F. Promis /TiVo
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R&B - Released April 20, 2005 | Bad Boy Records

Faith Evans had written songs for a variety of new jack and hip-hop artists (including Mary J. Blige, Al B. Sure!, Pebbles, and Christopher Williams) before releasing her first album, Faith. The record proves that she is as powerful in the spotlight as she is behind the scenes. Evans builds on a basic, hip-hop-influenced funk, alternating between simmering grooves and sultry ballads. Faith does have a couple of dull spots, but the album is a first-class debut. © Stephen Thomas Erlewine /TiVo
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R&B - Released May 19, 2017 | Rhino

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R&B - Released January 1, 2005 | Capitol Records

The first Faith Evans album without the Bad Boy logo on the sleeve and the word "faith" in the title, The First Lady thankfully offers nothing else in the way of a shake-up. The wait between 2001's Faithfully and this 2005 release was easily the longest in Evans' career. If there was any creative block during the time away, it doesn't show. In fact, The First Lady proves that she only gets better with time, as she goes through more ups and downs and continues to absorb her inspirations. At less than an hour in running time, it's her shortest album to date, which also helps make it her tightest. Where her first three albums are too lengthy, often bogged down with some lukewarm ballads, The First Lady is terrifically balanced in its distribution of club tracks, midtempo grooves, and slow jams -- with a knowing, timely homage to the late Lyn Collins thrown effectively into the mix -- and its tactful sequencing should give a lot of skip and delete buttons a break. Whatever dip in quality that transpires during the latter half of the album has more to do with the first half's excellence and numerous dimensions, including the punchy Neptunes production "Goin' Out," the sparkling "I Don't Need It," the uplifting "Again" (a good match with Fantasia's similarly affirming "Baby Mama"), and "Stop n Go" -- a gorgeous ballad with a devastating chorus. Evans, as always, does the bulk of the songwriting and some of the production with some key help. Jermaine Dupri, Chucky Thompson, Mario Winans, and the ubiquitous Bryan-Michael Cox also assist, but Carvin "Ransum" Haggins and Ivan "Orthodox" Barias deserve a lot of credit for their work on half of the songs. The First Lady is as well-rounded as an R&B album gets, regardless of the age it's part of. Like Teedra Moses' neglected Complex Simplicity, it smartly incorporates throwback aspects into state-of-the-art pop-soul. © Andy Kellman /TiVo
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R&B - Released April 20, 2005 | Bad Boy Records

Rap/Hip-Hop - Released January 1, 2005 | Capitol Records

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R&B - Released May 19, 2017 | Rhino

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released October 5, 2010 | eOne Music

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R&B - Released July 15, 2014 | Rhino Atlantic

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Soul - Released November 24, 2014 | BMG Rights Management (US) LLC

"We 'bout to make it hot for the summer, baby!," proclaims Missy Elliott at the beginning of Incomparable lead single "I Deserve It," which was officially released in late August. It was evidently intended for earlier impact, reached none of Billboard's charts, and didn't exactly scorch anyway. While those signs were all bad, Faith Evans' sixth proper album, which followed three months later, comfortably surpasses everything she released after 2005's The First Lady. Perhaps due to a combination of her reality television work, maturity, and the establishment of her own label, Evans sounds freer and more direct than ever, whether she's dealing with interpersonal or intrapersonal matters. The downside to that confidence and creative control is that the songs often sound disjointed from one another. These 16 cuts are more like a playlist of mostly good-to-great selections than a focused album; an '80s throwback trails a '60s throwback, and later, a traditional gospel-soul testimonial leads into a slick synthesizer groove. Scattered as it is, the album offers a lot to like. Best of all is the title track, produced by Brian Alexander Morgan -- right, the one who was behind SWV's "Weak" -- which rubberizes D Train's electro-funk classic "You're the One for Me" and is just as effective as Evans' past nods to Chic and the Jones Girls. © Andy Kellman /TiVo
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R&B - Released July 29, 2014 | Rhino Atlantic

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Rap/Hip-Hop - Released January 1, 2005 | Capitol Records

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R&B - Released October 2, 2012 | eOne Music

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Ambient/New Age - Released January 1, 2005 | Capitol Records

Faith Evans' first Christmas album, appropriately titled A Faithful Christmas, is very uneven and hastily thrown together. Within the span of 40 minutes, Evans switches between songs that sound thoroughly modern and songs that attempt to sound as if they were made decades ago, and she covers both secular and religious material, in addition to offering some originals that are spirited but bland. There are a couple strange moves, like a rendition of "O Come All Ye Faithful" with modern production tricks (like those water droplet sounds loved by R. Kelly and many others), which is a little jarring and very ineffective. Beyond an expected round of favorites covered here (including "Santa Baby," "Merry Christmas Baby," "Christmas Song," and "This Christmas"), a pleasant surprise is a straightforward version of "The Day That Love Began," a song recorded by both Stevie Wonder (1967) and Smokey Robinson & the Miracles (1970). Despite its faults, Evans' fans will likely enjoy this and rejoice in being able to hear seasonal music from one of their favorite artists. © Andy Kellman /TiVo
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R&B - Released May 19, 2017 | Rhino

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R&B - Released August 21, 2012 | eOne Music

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Soul - Released August 10, 2010 | E1 Music

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Soul - Released June 29, 2010 | E1 Music

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Soul - Released August 25, 2014 | BMG Rights Management (US) LLC